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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: euthanasia

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  • Abortion Vs Euthanasia - 939 words
    Abortion Vs. Euthanasia When it comes to the question of law, there are endless debates on which laws are just or which are unjust. Euthanasia and abortion are both very serious topics that bring controversy, mainly on whether it should be legal or not. Currently in Canada, abortion is legal, although assisted suicide is illegal. By making euthanasia legal in Canada as well, not only would humans benefit but also the country as a whole. Euthanasia rather than abortion seems to be a more reasonable solution because of the following aspects; the reasoning in making such a decision, the pain and suffering endured, and whether or not human rights are being dishonoured. When a person decides to t ...
    Related: abortion, euthanasia, family member, unborn child, accidental
  • An Argument For Euthanasia - 1,994 words
    An Argument For Euthanasia An Argument for Euthanasia Euthanasia is defined as, "The act or practice of putting to death painlessly a person suffering from an incurable disease." Euthanasia can be traced back as far back as the ancient Greek and Roman civilizations. It was sometimes allowed in these civilizations to help others die. Voluntary euthanasia was approved in these ancient societies. Today, the practice of euthanasia causes great controversy. Both pro-life groups and right-to-die groups present arguments for their different sides. Pro-life groups make arguments and present fears against euthanasia. I contend that the case for the right to die is the stronger argument. I will begin ...
    Related: euthanasia, voluntary euthanasia, unethical practice, medical association, dear
  • Euthanasia - 1,535 words
    Euthanasia Matchmaker.com: Sign up now for a free trial. Date Smarter! Euthanasia Lisa, a 43-year-old woman was diagnosed with lung cancer, terminal disease. For the past 2 years Lisa has been receiving chemotherapy and taking numerous types of medication trying to prolong her life. This life prolonging treatment caught up with her. Everyday now Lisa has to battle just to get out of bed, everyday getting worse and worse. The doctors now tell Lisa she has six to eight months to live, and she has to receive 6 hours of therapy everyday. Lisa then breaks down in tears. She decides she doesn't want to go through anymore pain or suffering. Now knowing it is only a matter of time before she dies, s ...
    Related: active euthanasia, euthanasia, voluntary euthanasia, assisted suicide, doctor who
  • Euthanasia - 1,167 words
    Euthanasia Opium- an addictive drug originally used as a painkiller. It is obtained from the unripe seeds of the opium poppy and can be made into substances that a person can smoke causing relaxation, alleviated anxiety, and a state of euphoria. Continued use of the drug also induces deterioration to the mind and body of a person eventually causing death. The substance was therefore stated illegal in China during the late 18th Century yet consistently smuggled into the country via British merchant ships. As the Chinese placed more restrictions on trade in an effort to abolish the importation of opium, the battle against the drug raged on until war was unavoidable between England and China. I ...
    Related: euthanasia, legal issues, mind and body, coast guard, replaced
  • Euthanasia - 345 words
    Euthanasia Euthanasia Euthanasia has brought great attention to the public eye since Dr. Jack Kevorkian was discovered for contributing to these horrible inhumane acts. At the present time, the state of Oregon has the world's only law specifically permitting a doctor to prescribe lethal drugs for the purpose of ending a patient's life (http://www.iaetf.org/faq.htm). Why has only one state that happens to be in the United States contributed to this horrible controversy? Euthanasia tends to attract people that are terminally ill who desire death and are usually depressed. A good medical doctor would prescribe an individual some antidepressant medication before taking ones life. Euthanasia allo ...
    Related: euthanasia, social issues, jack kevorkian, medical doctor, depressed
  • Euthanasia - 2,327 words
    Euthanasia The Right to Choose The main issues of euthanasia are maintaining the status of illegality, legalizing the procedure, and regulating the procedure. The controversy of euthanasia involves moral, ethical, and legal concerns. In this country, according to a survey reported in the Journal of American Medical Association, nearly 63 percent of Americans favor legalizing physician-assisted suicide, yet most state statutes criminalize it (Stark, np). People fear that if legalized, the choice to die will eventually be taken out of their hands and placed in the hands of people who will choose to kill select people based on their own private criteria. Maybe this is true, but it is doubtful. ...
    Related: euthanasia, voluntary euthanasia, insurance industry, fourteenth amendment, illegal
  • Euthanasia - 2,210 words
    ... of proper pain management, symptom control, psychological and spiritual support (Killing With Kindness, p 16). Palliative Care, opponents feel, should be more in the forefront. According to Choice in Dying, more than two million people in America die each year with 80 percent of those in care facilities. Vivienne Nathanson, head of ethics at the BMA, says that Doctors have become more aware that palliative care is effective. Temptation may come when adequate care is not available. But that's exactly what doctors and families should be demanding, not euthanasia. Once we have a perfect palliative care system, that is the time to look at the issue (Killing With Kindness, p 16). Regulated le ...
    Related: euthanasia, voluntary euthanasia, terminal illness, legal issues, theological
  • Euthanasia - 1,564 words
    Euthanasia Euthanasia continues to be an extremely controversial issue in society, and there are many opposing viewpoints concerning this specific subject. The case of Sue Rodriguez versus the province of British Columbia, is one that demonstrates the high degree of debate over such a sensitive topic, as euthanasia. The following is an analytical examination of the case at hand, and a critical comparison of it, to the theories of Patrick Nowell-Smith. When relating the theories of Patrick Nowell -Smith to the case of Sue Rodriguez, it is evident that he would not agree with the judges final decision. Firstly, it is necessary to discuss some of the relevant and significant points of the case. ...
    Related: active euthanasia, euthanasia, passive euthanasia, canadian charter of rights, human life
  • Euthanasia - 902 words
    Euthanasia Euthanasia Because our medical technology has improved so much, we are literally able to postpone death. People suffering from incurable diseases or injuries that would have died are being kept alive on machines. Because of this, people have argued for years over the legality of euthanasia. Some believe people should die with honor and not suffer. Others simply call it assisted suicide. Euthanasia should be an option for patients in extreme medical situations. The word euthanasia simply means an easy or painless death (eu meaning well, thanatos meaning death). Euthanasia was first started by the Greeks and has spread throughout the world (Koop 88). Although the act of euthanasia i ...
    Related: active euthanasia, euthanasia, passive euthanasia, hippocratic oath, different types
  • Euthanasia - 575 words
    Euthanasia Euthanasia is one of the most acute and uncomfortable contemporary problems in medical ethics. Is Euthanasia Ethical? The case for euthanasia rests on one main fundamental moral principle: mercy. It is not a new issue; euthanasia has been discussed-and practised-in both Eastern and Western cultures from the earliest historical times to the present. But because of medicine's new technological capacities to extend life, the problem is much more p Euthanasia is a way of granting mercy-both by direct killing and by letting the person die. This principle of mercy establishes two component duties: 1. the duty not to cause further pain or suffering; and 2. the duty to act to end pain or ...
    Related: active euthanasia, euthanasia, passive euthanasia, pain management, terminal illness
  • Euthanasia - 345 words
    Euthanasia Public opinion for euthanasia and doctor assisted suicide has always been mixed. A poll that was taken by the Gallup Organization in Canada during July 1995 proves that people are starting to see the advantages of euthanasia. The first question that was asked was: "When a person has an incurable disease that is immediately life threatening and causes that person to experience great suffering, do you, or do you not think that competent doctors should be allowed by law to end the patient's life through mercy killing, if the patient has made a formal request in writing?" It is proven in this first question that the general public believes that cases of great pain and suffering deserv ...
    Related: euthanasia, public opinion, general public, doctor assisted suicide, assisted-suicide
  • Euthanasia - 783 words
    Euthanasia "It is conceivable, that life can deteriorate to the point where persons lose their dignity and self-respect and are unable to communicate; life in such a form no longer meets meets the basic criteria of human-ness." (O'Keefe, A1) Under these circumstances only should Euthanasia be practiced and then only passively ("pulling the plug"). "Dutch Death", Euthanasia, doctor assisted suicide, whatever you want to call it, it should not be legalized. People should live their lives for as long as long as it is worth living. As long as someone can still have experiences and communicate with others, they should go on living. Someone may have six months to live and decides to end their life ...
    Related: euthanasia, drunk driving, underage drinking, assisted death, hash
  • Euthanasia - 1,067 words
    Euthanasia An eighty-seven year old grandmother on a respirator, a newborn child with AIDS, and a father in a coma; all put to death by respectable doctors with the O.K. of their families. But is it really 3O.K.? Euthanasia, or doctor-assisted suicide, has become as common as jumping off of a fifteen story building or taking a gun to one1s own head. Certainly society frowns upon suicide, but yet putting an old lady or a man in a coma to death is being accepted every day. Society knows that suicide is bad, but euthanasia is even worse. The guilt and blame of a lost life is falling on the hands of doctor1s that we are supposed to trust, and even worse, the family members themselves. A doctor i ...
    Related: euthanasia, passive euthanasia, medical bills, medical technology, newborn
  • Euthanasia - 1,059 words
    ... heir life because they feel like a burden to their family. If this is so, what has the world come to when the people that a patient has known, loved, and respected for so long, makes them feel like a burden. A person is supposed to be able to go to their family for support, that1s what a family is all about. Sticking together and getting through problems the right way, not ending one1s life. Many times a patient feels like a burden because of treatment costs. The cost of treatment is way too high for many patients to afford, so they go to their families. But rather than support and help, the patient gets resistance and feels as though they have become a burden. This causes them to want t ...
    Related: active euthanasia, euthanasia, passive euthanasia, good health, assisted suicide
  • Euthanasia - 1,792 words
    Euthanasia Euthanasia, is one of the most controversial issues of our time. This diver se issue raises many questions such as: how should decisions be made, and by whom? What should be determined as a matter of law and what left a matter of discretion and judgment? Should those who want to die, or who are in a "persistent vegetative state" be allowed to die voluntarily? Who should decide: the patient, the physician, the courts, or the families? The pro-euthanasia arguments turn on the individual case of the patient in pain, suffering at the center of an intolerable existence. When life becomes nbearable, quick death can be the answer. If living persons become so ill that they cannot tolerate ...
    Related: active euthanasia, euthanasia, social situations, paul d, beloved
  • Euthanasia - 418 words
    Euthanasia Should a patient who has lost all powers of reasoning and who lives like a vegetable, totally hopeless and helpless, a terminal case who only wants to die, be forced to live? The number of people who are asking this question increases each day. Although the official position of the medical profession is to maintain life indefinitetely, regardless of the condition of the patient, but with certain cases, euthanasia should be administered. We are living in an age of medical miracles. Medicine, has made so much dramatic progress, that lifesaving techniques were thought to be impossible, a generation age. Ill patients throughtout the world are kept alive by the use of defribbrilators, ...
    Related: euthanasia, medical profession, patients, dear
  • Euthanasia - 1,496 words
    Euthanasia Euthanasia, specifically voluntary euthanasia has been a taboo subject for many decades in this, and other countries. Euthanasia, as defined by the Oxford English Dictionary - bringing about of this, especially in the case of incurable and painful disease- comes from the Greek word euthanatos, meaning - a gentle and easy death. It is commonly known as death with dignity given to those who want the choice to die. No one can prevent death. The can only prolong it. Many people solicit their physicians to aid in the quick and easy death. Doctors, aware of ethics of their chosen profession, and consequences of their actions, especially malpractice suits, often refuse the request (www.e ...
    Related: active voluntary euthanasia, euthanasia, voluntary euthanasia, death sentence, medical center
  • Euthanasia - 992 words
    Euthanasia To Live or Not to Live The beliefs and views of our country are sometimes hypocritical and unjust. We have been educated with the idea that killing people is against our morality as well as our religious beliefs. However, there seems to be some instances when this rule does not apply. If one kills another in self-defense it is considered bravery, if a soldier kills an enemy in war it is considered courageous and honorable. On contrary, relieving a patients pain and desperate suffering by ending a patients life turns out to the human morality. The decisions that people make are always up for debate by anyone who has an opinion one way or another. The controversial issue of euthanas ...
    Related: euthanasia, medical association, unethical practice, people believe, preferable
  • Euthanasia - 808 words
    Euthanasia Euthanasia Euthanasia is the practice of mercifully ending a persons life in order to release the person from an incurable disease, intolerable suffering, or undignified death. The word euthanasia derives from the Greek for good death and originally referred to intentional mercy killing. When medical advances made prolonging the lives of dying or comatose patients possible, the term euthanasia was also applied to a lack of action to prevent death. There are three practices that are involved with Euthanasia. The first one is voluntary (or active) euthanasia, where the person asks to be killed. This involves painlessly putting individuals to death for merciful reasons, as when a doc ...
    Related: active euthanasia, euthanasia, passive euthanasia, voluntary euthanasia, ancient greece
  • Euthanasia - 1,096 words
    Euthanasia Euthanasia is clearly a deliberate and intentional aspect of a killing. Taking a human life, even with subtle rites and consent of the party involved is barbaric. No one can justly kill another human being. Just as it is wrong for a serial killer to murder, it is wrong for a physician to do so as well, no matter what the motive for doing so may be. Many thinkers, including almost all orthodox Catholics, believe that euthanasia is immoral. They oppose killing patients under any circumstances. Every human being has a natural inclination to continue living. Canadian and most other law forbids any form of homicide, including euthanasia and it is alleged that assisted suicide does even ...
    Related: euthanasia, lethal injection, legal aspects, assisted suicide, diagnosis
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