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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: european society

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  • A Postmodern Age - 1,423 words
    A Post-Modern Age? A Post-Modern Age? Introduction: Post-Modernism can be described as a particular style of thought. It is a concept that correlates the emergence of new features and types of social life and economic order in a culture; often called modernization, post-industrial, consumer, media, or multinational capitalistic societies. In Modernity, we have the sense or idea that the present is discontinuous with the past, that through a process of social, technological, and cultural change (either through improvement, that is, progress, or through decline) life in the present is fundamentally different from life in the past. This sense or idea as a world view contrasts with what is commo ...
    Related: postmodern, american market, european history, post modern, depot
  • Africa - 1,680 words
    Africa European Imperialism European Imperialism European expansion was almost a certainty. The continent was relatively poor place for agriculture, which pushed Europeans outside of Europe in search of new soil. Different countries sent explorers, like Columbus and Magellan, to find unknown trade routes to India and Asia. They stumbled onto new sources for raw materials and goods and Europe was suddenly substantially profiting. The exploration of Africa, Asia, and South America provided new wealth. It increased the standard of living for Europeans, introduced them to spices, luxurious goods, silver, and gold (class notes). Later revolutions and reformers throughout the 19th and 20th centuri ...
    Related: africa, africa asia, power over, european society, indochina
  • Coming To The New World - 1,119 words
    Coming To The New World Coming to the New World was a major advancement in the lives of many Spanish, French, and English people between the years of 1942-1629. The migration effected the lives dramatically. They will come to see that in the coming years almost everything will change from religion to their types of settlement. The role of religion was very important, for it had an immense power over the European society. Christianity converted all of Europe including the Spanish, French, and English. Christian doctrine provided a common understanding of God. The church provided authority and discipline in the society. Every village had a church, which thought that Satan constantly challenged ...
    Related: religious conversion, catholic church, king phillip, aztec, netherlands
  • Daisy Miller - 849 words
    Daisy Miller Upon Winterbournes return to Vevey, Switzerland, he had been resting on a park bench, conversing with a curious little boy when a beautiful young lady, Daisy Miller, approached. After a brief prattle, the two arranged a days trip to the Castle of Chillon and over the next few months planned on meeting again in Italy. Throughout the story, Winterbourne tries to descry Miss Millers personality and at the same time question her reputation as a flirtatious American girl in the late nineteenth century. Henry James famous novelette, Daisy Miller, is a timeless story depicting what results from the defiance of social customs, ignoring advice pertaining to ones reputation, and finally c ...
    Related: daisy, daisy miller, miller, dear friend, european society
  • Economics Of Europe - 1,499 words
    Economics Of Europe The Effects of Post-Industrialism On the Political Economy of Western Europe The Decline of Corporatist Bargaining The sustained, high economic growth in Western Europe during the post-war period until 1973 led to dramatic changes in the region's political economy. As advances in transportation and communication extended the reach of international trade into new areas of the world, as technological advances allowed establishment of manufacturing facilities overseas, and as European real wages climbed to unprecedented heights, the industrial base that had served as the foundation for rapid Western European growth in the 1950's and 1960's increasingly moved to Western Europ ...
    Related: economic conditions, economic growth, economic performance, economics, western europe
  • Essay On Christopher Columbus - 449 words
    Essay on Christopher Columbus Columbus as a man had many positive contributions as well as negative. People all over the world celebrate Columbus Day, because of his achievements, and success in finding the "New World". Although, many people revel in his glory, their are facts that infer that Columbus wasn't as admirable as people think of him. In 1892, Columbus was a hero, virtually everyone praised him. On the contrary in 1992, revisionists who are delving into archives, are uncovering the negative aspects of his infamous voyage. Columbus' journey was the first step in a process that produced an experiment, where the "New World" became a symbol and a home for democracy. In 1892, people per ...
    Related: christopher, christopher columbus, columbus, native american, old world
  • Fitzgerald Protagonists - 1,095 words
    Fitzgerald Protagonists There is a very direct similarity between ones behavior and ones environment. Humans are products of the environments they inhabit. Humans evolve and adopt behaviors which are very similar to those found in their social climate. This is especially true when examining the characters of F. Scott Fitzgerald. Fitzgerald presents the characters in his novels as products of a society void of moral integrity. Since Fitzgeralds protagonists in The Last Tycoon, The Great Gatsby, and Tender is The Night, succumb to the moral desert of high society, they end their lives in failure. Fitzgerald places his protagonist in The Last Tycoon, The Great Gatsby , and Tender is The Night, ...
    Related: f scott fitzgerald, f. scott fitzgerald, fitzgerald, scott fitzgerald, european society
  • Freud - 2,304 words
    Freud Sigmund Freud was the first of six children to be born into his middle class, Jewish family. His father was a wool merchant, and was the provider for the family. From the time Freud was a child, he pondered theories in math, science, and philosophy, but in his teens, he took a deep interest in what he later called psychoanalysis. He wanted to discover how a persons mind works, so he began to explore the conscious and unconscious parts of ones psyche. Freuds parents and siblings were directly involved in allowing him to pursue this unexplored area of psychology. He was given his own room so that he could study his books in silence, and was only disturbed when it was time to eat. Freud e ...
    Related: freud, sigmund freud, stuart mill, cultural norms, disagree
  • Great Gatsby - 1,900 words
    Great Gatsby Francis Scott Key Fitzgerald, born in St. Paul, Minnesota, grew up in an upper-middle class family where he enjoyed the traditions of the upper classes, but not the financial ability to uphold those practices. Fitzgerald acquired his fame, almost overnight, with the publication of his first book, This Side of Paradise, in 1920. His extensive career began with the writing of stories for mass-circulation magazines, such as The Saturday Evening Post. That same year, he married Zelda Sayre, who later became one his major influences on his writing, along with literature, Princeton, and alcohol. In the summer of 1924, Fitzgerald wrote The Great Gatsby, a novel about the American dream ...
    Related: gatsby, great gatsby, jay gatsby, the great gatsby, long island
  • Heart Of Darkness By Conrad - 1,479 words
    Heart Of Darkness By Conrad Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad In Joseph Conrad's novel, 'Heart of Darkness', the term "darkness" can be related to a few different meanings. Conrad uses this term in various ways to characterize social, political and psychological affairs in order to help the reader get a feel of his attitudes towards things, such as colonialism, Africa, and civilization. The first impression of the word "darkness" in relations to this novel that I understood was its reference to racism. This, I got from the way Conrad writes about the White people and how they treated the natives (Black), in Africa. During the colonization of Africa, forced ideals of a race that thought of t ...
    Related: conrad, darkness, darkness conrad, heart of darkness, joseph conrad
  • Henry James - 834 words
    Henry James Henry James was born in New York in 1843. His parents were Henry James Sr. and Mary James. Henry James had three brothers and one sister. Henry James ancestor, William James, was an 18 year old Irishman who arrived in America in 1789. According to family legend, the ancestor arrived with a very small sum of money and later gained a small fortune through the establishment of a store in New York. Later, he ventured into banking and the manufacture of salt which paved his way as a powerful man in the upper Hudson area. Jamesville, New York and two streets in Albany and Syracuse were named after this legendary ancestor ( Henry James). As a young child, Henry James had only private tu ...
    Related: henry james, william james, young child, european society, lovely
  • In The Neverending Search For Energy Sources, The Invention Of The Steam Engine Changed The Face Of The Earth Siegel, Preface - 1,055 words
    "In the never-ending search for energy sources, the invention of the steam engine changed the face of the earth." (Siegel, Preface) The steam engine was the principal power source during the British Industrial Revolution in the 18th century. The steam engine opened a whole new world to everyone. The steam engine maximized production, efficiency, reliability, minimized time, the amount of labor, and the usage of animals. The steam engine in all revolutionized the Eastern Hemisphere, mainly European society. What does revolutionize actually mean? It means that something such as the steam engine brought about a radical change in something, and this something is the European Society. The steam e ...
    Related: engine, invention, preface, steam, steam engine
  • Jonathan Swift - 1,489 words
    Jonathan Swift Satire on a Nation Jonathan Swifts, Gullivers Travels satirically relates bodily functions and physical attributes to social issues during Englands powerful rule of Europe. Through out the story we find many relations between bodily features and British and European society. Swift uses this tone of mockery to explain to his reader the importance of many different topics during this time of European rule. Swift feels that the body and their functions relate to political as well as the ration of a society. Swifts fascination with the body comes from its unproblematic undertone which gives his audience recognizable parallelism to many issues such as political change and scientifi ...
    Related: jonathan, jonathan swift, swift, european society, government officials
  • Khubilai Khan - 1,685 words
    Khubilai Khan The founder of China's Yuan, or Mongol, Dynasty was a brilliant statesman and military leader named Khubilai Khan. Grandson and the best-known successor of the great Mongol conqueror Genghis Khan, Khubiliai became the first emperor of the Mongol Empire. He completed the conquest of China that was begun by his grandfather. Khubilai's major accomplishment was convincing China to be ruled by foreign people, the Mongols. His achievements were first brought to the Western and European society in the writings of Marco Polo, the Venetian traveler who lived in China for nearly 20 years. Khubilai Khan began to play a significant part in the consolidation of Mongol rule when his brother, ...
    Related: genghis khan, great khan, khan, yangtze river, various religions
  • Nationalism - 844 words
    Nationalism During the 100-year period of 1814 to 1914 every social group throughout Europe embraced the ideology of nationalism. Its success was largely due to the fact that it offered something for everyone regardless of social or political status. It had no specific ideas for government or economy, just simply whatever is best for the nation. Nationalism also combined well with all other ideologies of the time. However, the different classes of European society accepted nationalism for different reasons and at different times. In the years 1814 through 1848 nationalism ascended onto European society through the middle class. Shortly after the French Revolution in 1814 the Congress of Vien ...
    Related: nationalism, john f kennedy, middle class, social security, unification
  • Oroonokos Slavery Problem: An Interpretation - 1,912 words
    Oroonoko's Slavery Problem: An Interpretation Aphra Behn's seventeenth century tale of a noble African prince's tragic fall to slavery, Oroonoko, has often been cited as a major antislavery work. Under close examination, however, Oroonoko tells a more complex story. The volatile cultural, moral, and religious crosscurrents that Behn finds surrounding her manifest themselves in the forms of narrative equivocality and intermittent satire in Oroonoko. Throughout the text, she seemingly possesses a conflicting attitude toward the slavery institution and racism in general. On one hand, her portrayal of the protagonist Oroonoko is just, heroic, and deeply sympathetic, and she often disparages Euro ...
    Related: interpretation, slavery, british literature, personal story, laughing
  • Social Recognition Of The Human Individual - 1,217 words
    ... the 1848 revolutions failed because they lacked the support of the militaries, but they were clear evidence that the rising urban middle class of Europe was beginning to find its identity in their respective cultures. This was a key stage in the metamorphosis fraternity was undergoing in order to become the most potent political force of the period from 1850 to 1918, nationalism. Here the industrial revolution plays a key role in the evolution of fraternity. As the aforementioned monolithic, industrial infrastructures were raised all around Europe, an individual citizen of such a large system motivated only by the guilt of his Protestant work ethic loses his feelings of purpose or signi ...
    Related: human behavior, human development, individual level, recognition, social structure
  • Subject History - 1,963 words
    subject = History title = The Tragedy of the Black Death papers = Imagine yourself alone on a street corner, coughing up bloody mucous each time you exhale. You are gasping for a full breath of air, but realizing that is not possible, you give up your fight to stay alive. You're thinking, why is this happening to me? That is how the victims of the Black Death felt. The Black Death had many different effects on the people of the Middle Ages. To understand the severity of this tragic epidemic you must realize a few things about the plague. You should know what the Black Death is, the cause of the plague, the symptoms, the different effects it had on the people, and the preventions and cures fo ...
    Related: history, middle ages, bubonic plague, mediterranean sea, gertrude
  • The Art Of Influence - 1,038 words
    The Art Of Influence THE ART OF INFLUENCE; Africa And Its' Influence On Western Art Between The Mid-Nineteenth Century and The First World War During the mid 19th century up until the Great War of 1914, European countries began to heavily colonize and come into contact with African nations. This was called "new imperialism". During this contact, European culture was influenced by Africa. The influence of the African people can be seen in the European society of the time. In the 19th and 20th centuries, modern artists embraced African art for its lack of pretension or formal qualities. In the latter part of the 19th century, the "scramble for Africa," consolidated at the Berlin Conference, di ...
    Related: first world, rain forest, african people, visiting, arranged
  • The New Age After The 1500s - 1,008 words
    ... ther continents. Soon a permanent slaving station was set up in West Africa. This shows the rapid discovery of the profitability of the new traffic. It was already clear that it was a business of brutality. As the search for slaves went further inland, it became simpler to rely on local potentates who would round up captives and barter them wholesale. Early industrial centers grew by accretion, often around the centers of established European industries closely related to agriculture. This long continued to be true. These old trades had created concentrations of supporting industry. Antwerp had been the great port of entry to Europe for English cloth; as a result, finishing and dyeing es ...
    Related: the prince, twentieth century, social reality, steel, agrarian
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