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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: absurdity

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  • Absurdity And The Stranger - 615 words
    Absurdity And The Stranger Absurdity is defined as that which is contrary to reason; clearly untrue, unreasonable or ridiculous. It is often a topic in existentialist writings relating to life. This subject is prevalent in Camus The Stranger and The Myth of Sisyphus. Camus depicts absurdity bringing about happiness or indifference in each of these literary works. In The Myth of Sisyphus, it is made clear that Sisyphus is aware that his existence is absurd. He is sentenced to an eternity of rolling a boulder up a steep mountain only to let it roll back down when it reaches its peak. His tragedy lies in the fact that he is conscious of the extent of his own misery. He is the ultimate absurd; t ...
    Related: absurdity, stranger, death sentence, moral code, complain
  • 65279 It Is Unusual When A Masterpiece Develops Out Of An Assignment, But That Is, More Or Less, What - 1,904 words
    It is unusual when a masterpiece develops out of an assignment, but that is, more or less, what happened in the case of Gullivers Travels. The Martinus Scriblerus Club proposed to satirize the follies and vices of learned, scientific and modern men. Each of the members was given a topic, and Swifts was to satirize the numerous and popular volumes describing voyages to faraway lands. Ten years passed between the Scriblerus project and the publication of Gullivers Travels, but when Swift finished, he had completed a definitive work in travel literature. Moreover, he had completed what was to become a childrens classic (in its abridged form) and a satiric masterpiece. Swifts main character, Gul ...
    Related: masterpiece, unusual, make sense, time passes, principal
  • A Comparison Of Macbeth And Crime And Punishment - 1,336 words
    A Comparison of Macbeth and Crime and Punishment Shakespeares Macbeth and Dostoevskys Crime and Punishment explore the psychological depths of man. These two works examine tragedy as represented through the existential beliefs of many philosophers. Existentialist theory expresses the idea that man can satisfy his own needs, regardless of social codes, if he has the energy and ambition to act. Both Macbeth and Raskolnikov have the ambition to act, but each struggles internally with their actions, frightened of the consequences. Although these works examine the tragedy and remorse of Macbeth and Raskolnikov, the idea of a driving force within each character remains evident. Ultimately, William ...
    Related: comparison, crime, crime and punishment, macbeth, punishment
  • A Lesson From Oliver - 5,261 words
    ... had little wish to draw him into this conversation. I decided to change the subject quickly. "Coincidentally, yes sir. Why I'm calling, though, is to inquire about the number of outboard motors that have gone missing since last week." "Pardon me?" The tone of his voice took a sudden sinister turn that sent a twinge through my bladder. Like the rookie I was, I had made some as yet unrecognized blunder. I felt the strong urge to conclude the interview immediately, but it was too late. He knew my name. He knew my brother's name. He knew why I'd called. He knew everything. I'd have to bluff past my own ignorance. "Well, I was wondering if the police suspected some kind of theft ring being i ...
    Related: lesson, oliver, crime scene, media coverage, nash
  • A Separate Peace: Chapter 1 - 5,662 words
    ... truth, the shadowy, elusive truth of an instant that is already beginning to fade in memory. Gene is about to make a full confession--or he thinks he is--when Dr. Stanpole and the nurse arrive. The following day Finny is sent home to recuperate. The summer session comes to an end, appropriately enough for Gene, for until now summer had represented freedom, sports, and running outdoors, with Finny as the light and life of it all. Now all that has changed. A month later, after a sojourn at home, Gene heads back to school for his senior year. On the way he makes a detour to call on Finny. NOTE: The "surprise" reunion is no surprise to Finny, who appears to have been waiting anxiously in hop ...
    Related: separate peace, ultimate punishment, last time, self awareness, burning
  • Absurd - 1,347 words
    Absurd Theatre Influences on Theatre of the Absurd Big feet, stampeding rhinoceroses, and barren sets are typical of the theatre of the absurd. The dramatic content, symbolism, and spectacles are an amazing thing to see and an impossibility to comprehend. The philosophy of the absurd and the dawn of mankind influenced these plays in the twentieth century. The main proponents and works of the theater of the absurd and philosophy were influenced by the chaotic actions of the early and mid-twentieth century. These chaotic actions led them to search for something in literature and drama never seen before. A brief survey of the main proponents and works of the absurd philosophy and theater can le ...
    Related: absurd, human life, north africa, political power, cycle
  • Absurd - 1,338 words
    ... hinoceros, as being the Nazi influence, and Berenger, the main character, as an ordinary man in an extraordinary situation. The chaos of the early to mid-twentieth century influenced Ionesco's life and work's greatly. He struggled with the concept of the absurd and soon became the father of the theatre of the absurd. He led men such as Samuel Beckett and Jean Genet to a greater understanding of the absurd. Samuel Beckett was one of the greatest names of the theater of the absurd. He spent a lifetime of hardship and work to overcome the challenges of his low self-esteem and confidence. He grew up in Dublin, Ireland, in a prominent family. After college, he was employed as James Joyce's se ...
    Related: absurd, modern world, liberation organization, middle class, autobiographical
  • Absurd Hero - 873 words
    Absurd Hero Albert Camus is a very hard man to figure out. He puts very complex thoughts and emotions into his writings, and you have to draw them out strategically. His thoughts of how everyday people live and think are genuine and you can see that in his writing. I am basing all my knowledge here on Camus book, The Stranger, and his essay, The Myth of Sisyphus. Camus said in his essay on Sisyphus, Sisyphus is an absurd hero. Camus talks of how Sisyphus, a man punished to continually roll a rock up a mountain only to watch it come tumbling back down, is a perfect example of an absurd hero. He says that he is the absurd hero as much through his passions as through his torture. His scorn of t ...
    Related: absurd, albert camus, myth of sisyphus, stuff, consciousness
  • Adolf Hitlers Affect On The World - 1,604 words
    Adolf Hitler's Affect On The World Joe Ciano Mrs. Colford Global History 9 January 1999 Adolf Hitlers Influence on the World Adolf Hitler was born in Braunau am Inn, Austria.(Dorpalen Microsoft Encarta 98) Eighteen ninety-nine was the year of his birth. He was a poor boy and a high school dropout. He was rejected twice from the Academy of Fine Arts in Vienna for lack of talent.(The Volume Library 2 Pg. 1745) At age 25, Hitler eagerly volunteered to serve in W.W.I. His fellow soldiers were unlike him. They would always talk about bad food and women but he would prefer to discuss history or art. Despite his early luck during the first two years of the war, he was later injured twice and decora ...
    Related: adolf, adolf hitler, world war ii, freedom of the press, nazi germany
  • Adventures Of Huck Finn - 1,238 words
    Adventures Of Huck Finn Ever since it was written, Mark Twains Huckleberry Finn has been a novel that many people have found disturbing. Although some argue that the novel is extremely racist, careful reading will prove just the opposite. In recent years especially, there has been an increasing debate over what some will call the racist ideas in the novel. In some cases the novel has even been banned by public school systems and censored by public libraries. The basis for the debate is how Jim, a black slave and one of the main characters, is depicted. However, if one was to look at the underlying themes in the novel, they would realize that it is not racist and could even be considered an a ...
    Related: finn, huck, huck finn, huckleberry finn, public school
  • Alice In Wonderland - 1,801 words
    Alice In Wonderland Finding the Child in Us All Lewis Carroll's classic Alice's Adventures in Wonderland has entertained not only children but adults for over one hundred years. The tale has become a treasure of philosophers, literary critics, psychoanalysts, and linguists. It also has attracted Carroll's fellow mathematicians and logicians. There appears to be something in Alice for everyone, and there are almost as many explanations of the work as there are commentators. It may be perhaps Carroll's fantastical style of writing that entertains the reader, rather than teaching them a lesson as was customary in his time. Heavy literary symbolism is difficult to trace through his works because ...
    Related: alice, alice in wonderland, wonderland, nineteenth century, young adult
  • Atomic - 2,186 words
    ... re were no smells. There was no movement. Every step I took made a gravelly squeak in blue-white frost. And every squeak was echoed loudly. The season of locking was over. The Earth was locked up tight (179).This description eerily resembles what many have said the Earth will look like during a nuclear winter (Stone, 62). In addition to Dr. Hoenikker and his doomsday games, Vonnegut provides an interesting analysis of atomic age society with the Bokonon religion. This religion, completely made up by Vonnegut and used in this novel, is the religion of every single inhabitant of San Lorenzo, the books imaginary banana republic. This is the island where Jonah eventually ends up, and where t ...
    Related: atomic, atomic bomb, collected poems, nuclear waste, ripper
  • Beloved - 1,627 words
    Beloved By Toni Morrison "It is the ultimate gesture of a loving mother. It is the outrageous claim of a slave"(Morrison 1987). These are the words that Toni Morrison used to describe the actions of the central character within the novel, Beloved. That character, Sethe, is presented as a former slave woman who chooses to kill her baby girl rather than allowing her to be exposed to the physically, emotionally, and spiritually oppressive horrors of a life spent in slavery. Sethe's action is indisputable: She has killed her child. Sethe's motivation is not so clearly defined. By killing her "Beloved" child, has Sethe acted out of true love or selfish pride? The fact that Sethe's act is irration ...
    Related: beloved, true love, more important, personal responsibility, veil
  • Beyond The Problem Of Evil - 3,962 words
    ... is caught in his illusion of volition . . . [This illusion], his assumption that free will exists, is also part of the calculable mechanism ( 106). When a misfortune strikes, we can overcome it either by removing its cause or else by changing the effect it has on our feelings . . .( 108). There are elements in each of these texts--e.g., the denial of free will, the rejection of the idea retributive justice, and the recognition of possibility of overcoming our emotional reactions rather than our external environment--which resonate with the sympathetic reader of Spinoza. And while, in later years, Nietzsche loses some of his positivistic fervor, we shall see that significant similarities ...
    Related: good and evil, spoke zarathustra, heavenly father, c. s. lewis, attain
  • Candid By Voltaire - 1,349 words
    Candid By Voltaire Francois-Marie Arouet de Voltaire, in his satirical masterwork Candide, critiques both society and humanity wit little mercy. The author obviously seeks to expose all of the human race's self-deceptions and weaknesses, but he does so with great humor. Voltaire gives delight with his humor while planting the deeper message about the fallibility and corruption of humanity. This contradiction holds the power of Voltaire's writing. Candide provides a horrific portrait of the human condition, but it does so with preposterous and outlandish humor. Voltaire especially intends to criticize the popular idea of his era that sees a rational order in the world: "Voltaire shows how the ...
    Related: candid, voltaire, human condition, francois marie arouet, critiquing
  • Catch 22 - 1,169 words
    Catch 22 Heller's principle emphasis is on the internal struggle with conflicting values and the characters' evolution. He creates a quandary that Yossarian explores throughout the novel, and establishes Yossarian's world as one turned upside down by war. After exploring this chaotic condition and the mess it creates on people's values, Yossarian finally arrives at his decision to withdraw from the conflict. In the first half of the war, Yossarian runs. As he comes to terms with himself, he takes responsibility and explores life beyond himself. Identifying his adversary after careful reasoning, Yossarian names the enemy as 'anybody who's going to get you killed, no matter which side he's on. ...
    Related: catch, catch 22, first half, young woman, irony
  • Catch 22 - 1,233 words
    Catch 22 Joseph Heller satirizes, among other matters, red tape and bureaucracy in his first novel, Catch-22. The novel concerns itself with a World War II bombardier named Yossarian who suddenly realizes the danger of his position and tries various means to extricate himself from further missions. Yossarian is driven crazy by the Germans, who keep shooting at him when he drops bombs on them, and by his American superiors, who seem less concerned about winning the war than they are about getting promoted. Heller spent eight years writing Catch-22, is a former student at three universities--New York, Columbia and Oxford--and a former teacher at Pennsylvania State College. From 1942 to 1945 he ...
    Related: catch, catch 22, mediterranean sea, world war ii, raising
  • Catch 22 - 857 words
    Catch 22 America has been involved in the cold war for years. The fear of communism is ruining lives. The country moves closer and closer to the Korean war. Joseph Hellers Catch 22 is published. 1963- College students are seen wearing army fatigues with "Yossarian" name tags. Reports are being made about a "Heller Cult". Bumper stickers are manufactured which read, "Better Yossarian then Rotarian". The phrase "Catch 22" has surfaced meaning a"no win situation" it is now an excepted word in the English dictionary. Such a dramatic change in opinion from the earlier, Pro-war society, it is obvious that Catch 22 had some impact on the anti-war movement of the 1960s-1970s. Not to say the book was ...
    Related: catch, catch 22, human spirit, korean war, pretend
  • Catch - 691 words
    Catch-22 The novel, Catch-22, is a comedy about soldiers during World War II. However, this comic scenes and phrases are quite tragic when they are thought about, as most things related to war are, which makes this comedy completely absurd. The best way to represent this idea is through the characters in the book, specifically, Yossarian, Huple, and Natelys whores kid sister and the events that occur with their thoughts and their actions. Clearly, the main character and one whose life is chiefly described, is Yossarian. Yossarian has a slightly sick sense of humor and way of looking at things. In the first chapter, Heller tells us that letters sent by the soldiers had to be reviewed in order ...
    Related: catch, catch 22, main character, world war ii, absurdity
  • Cats Cradle - 964 words
    CatS Cradle In questioning the value of literary realism, Flannery O'Connor has written, "I am interested in making a good case for distortion because it is the only way to make people see." Kurt Vonnegut writes pessimistic novels, or at least he did back in the sixties. Between Slaughterhouse Five, Mother Night, and Cat's Cradle, Vonnegut paints a cynical and satirical picture of the degradation of society using distortion as the primary means to express himself. In Cat's Cradle, the reader is confronted with the story of the narrator, John, as he attempts to gather material to write a book on the human aspect of the day Japan was bombed. As the story progresses, he finds that becomes incre ...
    Related: cats, cradle, general electric company, flannery o'connor, calling
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