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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: ethnocentrism

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  • Cultural Comparisons Ethnocentrism - 1,069 words
    Cultural Comparisons Ethnocentrism Culture Cultural comparisons Ethnocentrism Ethnocentrism is the name given to a tendency to interpret or evaluate other cultures in terms of one's own. This tendency has been, perhaps, more prevalent in modern nations than among preliterate tribes. The citizens of a large nation, especially in the past, have been less likely to observe people in another nation or culture than have been members of small tribes who are well acquainted with the ways of their culturally diverse neighbours. Thus, the American tourist could report that Londoners drive on the wrong side of the street or an Englishman might find some customs on the Continent queer or boorish, merel ...
    Related: cultural relativism, ethnocentrism, culturally diverse, wind power, acquisition
  • Cultural Comparisons Ethnocentrism - 1,035 words
    ... ermine culture change. The Fuegians living at the southern tip of South America, as viewed by Charles Darwin on his voyage on the Beagle, lived in a very cold, harsh environment but were virtually without both clothing and dwellings. Diffusion Culture is contagious, as a prominent anthropologist once remarked, meaning that customs, beliefs, tools, techniques, folktales, ornaments, and so on may diffuse from one people or region to another. To be sure, a culture trait must offer some advantage, some utility or pleasure, to be sought and accepted by a people. (Some anthropologists have assumed that basic features of social structure, such as clan organization, may diffuse, but a sounder vi ...
    Related: cultural development, cultural evolution, ethnocentrism, modern europe, ancient egypt
  • Ethnocentrism - 773 words
    Ethnocentrism Ethnocentrism can be defined as regarding ones own race or culture as supreme to others. Unfortunately, minority groups living in the United States are under the impression they must conform to the American ways in order to succeed. As a result the ramifications of ethnocentrism in the United States have caused minorities to change in order to fit in with society. In Langston Hughes poem Theme For English B, Hughes recalls a time when a professor assigned a page that was to come out of you- / Then it will be true. Hughes, twenty-two, colored and born in Winston-Salem was uncomfortable with the assignment at first, being the only black student in the class. He writes about all t ...
    Related: ethnocentrism, chinese culture, minority groups, american culture, maria
  • A Rose, By A Vulcan Name, Would Smell As Sweet - 1,201 words
    A Rose, By A Vulcan Name, Would Smell As Sweet A Rose, By a Vulcan Name, Would Smell as Sweet. Social commentary is dangerous. In addition to risking social and political censure, the commentator must carefully convey the message. In directly addressing a problem, one risks alienating an audience before making one's point. If one indirectly approaches said problem, one may appear to lack conviction or a point. Star Trek: the Original Series takes a third path, that of allegory. Unfortunately, as the television series belongs to the science fiction genre, its social significance is often disregarded. However, upon examination, it is clear that the veiled nature of commentary in Star Trek is v ...
    Related: smell, sweet, time magazine, social situations, intolerance
  • A World Of Diversity - 614 words
    A World of Diversity Ethnocentric, derived from the Greek words of Ethnos, meaning race, people or cultural group, and Kentrikos, meaning concentrated about or directed to a center is a word that greatly describes many cultures on this planet we call Earth . The official definition of Ethnocentric is " characterized or based on the attitude that ones own group is superior" or "having race as a central interest". There is a whole world of problems, politics, and, other cultures, but it seems that the average Americans only interest is that of themselves. The reason I chose to focus more on the American being ethnocentric is because I have been exposed the most to this culture. Why is it that ...
    Related: diversity, world politics, world view, foreign countries, simon fraser university
  • African American Culture - 957 words
    African American Culture African American Culture Culture is not a fixed phenomenon, nor is it the same in all places or to all people. It is relative to time, place, and particular people. Learning about other people can help us to understand ourselves and to be better world citizens. One of the most common ways of studying culture is to focus on the differences within and among cultures. Although their specifics may vary form one culture to another, sociologists refer to those elements or characteristics that can be found in every know society as cultural universals. For example, in all societies, funeral rites include expression of grief, disposing of the dead, and rituals that define the ...
    Related: african, african american, african american culture, african art, american, american community, american culture
  • Aggressive Behavior - 1,312 words
    Aggressive Behavior Aggression is a behavioral characteristic that refers to forceful actions or procedures (such a deliberate attack) with intentions to dominate or master. It tends to be hostile, injurious, or destructive, and is often motivated by frustration (The Merriam-Webster Dictionary, 1995). For an individual, aggressive behavior is considered understandable and normal under appropriate circumstances, but when it is frequent, intense, lasting, and pervasive, it is more likely to be a symptom of a mental disorder. Likewise, aggression between groups, can be in the form of healthy competition, but can become harmful when unfair or unjust disadvantage or frustration is perceived, lead ...
    Related: abnormal behavior, aggressive, aggressive behavior, behavioral therapy, social norms
  • As The Twentieth Century Comes To A Close, The World Can Now Look Back On A Century Filled With War, Technology, Revolution, - 1,601 words
    As the twentieth century comes to a close, the world can now look back on a century filled with war, technology, revolution, and growth. When looking back upon the most powerful leaders that shaped past century, it cant be assumed that all of them had good intentions in mind. In fact, it is these leaders, the ones who set forth goals of destruction and massacre, that have affected the past hundred years the most drastically. The two men who fully represented this figure of dictatorship and extreme fascism are without a question Adolf Hitler of Germany and Benito Mussolini of Italy. These men strove for unrealistic and inhumane ideals, and both convinced a nation to follow them. Hitler and Mu ...
    Related: first world, twentieth, twentieth century, world domination, world war i
  • Causes Of World War I - 1,279 words
    ... ples of Russia had deep sympathy for their ethnic brothers in Serbia and so offered them support. Serbia, recognizing Russian defense, felt they had the power to question their Austrian rulers who ignored Serbian demands to liberate their people. Austria, ethnically dissimilar from the Serbians they governed, looked to a history of German association to counter the Serbian threat of Russian involvement. Germany, without need of an ally, saw the Austrian proposal as a means to create a stronger Germany, one that could compete with Europe's historical powers, France and Britain and the world's up and coming powers, The United States and Russia. If nothing else, ethnic differences between o ...
    Related: world book, world war i, treaty of versailles, austria hungary, vital
  • Cross Cultural Studies - 447 words
    Cross Cultural Studies Question: What is the value of making cross-cultural comparisons? (Miller, Pg#11: 1999) Cultural anthropology encompasses all aspects of human beliefs, behaviors and ideas. What would the world be like without any knowledge of other cultures? Anthropologists study different cultures to be more understanding and accepting, more appreciative and to enrich our own culture. What is the real problem with the Ku Klux Klan? Perhaps, if they took the time to understand the African-American and Jewish cultures, for example, they would be more accepting of the diversity. Hundreds of years of cultural imperialism has evolved into a legion of hate. Emic studies put the researcher ...
    Related: cross cultural, cultural anthropology, cultural diversity, cultural imperialism, cultural relativism, cultural studies
  • Cultural Relativism: Is Truth Defined By Our Culture Or Our Culture By Truth - 1,597 words
    Cultural Relativism: Is Truth Defined By Our Culture Or Our Culture By Truth? In his article "Cultural relativism and cultural values", Melville Herkovits defines the principle of cultural relativism as "judgements are based on experience, and experience is interpreted by each individual in terms of his own enculturation" (26). This is the basic premise of cultural relativism, that beliefs, values, and morals are all based on one's culture. Therefore, since morality is based on society and different societies have different views of right and wrong, there can be no moral absolutes. Since there are no absolutes, under this view of cultural relativism all moral views determined by one's cultur ...
    Related: african culture, american culture, cultural relativism, cultural values, western culture
  • Culture Shock - 1,291 words
    Culture Shock Culture Shock The United States of America is a country in which many people from all over the world comes to live harmoniously with each other. Unlike Canada, which is a multicultural country, it is a melting pot since each person brings his peculiarity to enrich the culture of this country. But this melting process is not always without pain or hurt. I felt the life in Canada is more comfortable According to John J. Macionis, the author of Sociology, secondary Canadian edition. Culture shock is a state of bewilderment, anxiety, disorientation and distress as an individual suddenly exposed to a social or cultural environment radically different from his own. It happens frequen ...
    Related: chinese culture, culture shock, shock, north american, country people
  • Ethnic Conflict In The Middle East - 1,932 words
    Ethnic Conflict In The Middle East Ethnic Conflict in the Middle East Ethnic conflicts are well rooted in the world's history and perhaps inherent in human nature. This type of conflict is difficult to resolve as is evident in the situation in the Middle East. The ethnic conflict theory explains that it is not territory, politics, or economics that prevents the achievement of peace between the Israeli and Palestinian peoples, instead, it is a deep-seated hatred of one another that neither group can overcome. The Camp David Summit in July 2000, the most recent attempt at fostering a lasting peace is a clear example of how ethnocentrism can prevents success. Contrasting with neo-realism, which ...
    Related: conflict resolution, conflict theory, east jerusalem, ethnic, ethnic conflict, ethnic groups, ethnic identity
  • European And Us Culture - 941 words
    European and U.S. Culture Concept Paper # 2 My trip to Europe was an eye opening experience. It awakened my senses to so many different aspects of life I had not already been introduced to. It was almost like watching a movie, from the minute I stepped of the plane everything was different. When I think about the trip and what experiences I had many sociological concepts come to mind, such as, Culture shock, ethnocentrism, culture, social locators, cultural transmission, norms, language, and subculture. It seems being placed directly in the middle of something that is so different made it easier to pick out the different concepts. When I first got off the plane I immediately experienced so m ...
    Related: culture shock, lower class, everyday life, the prince, thick
  • Evolution Of Technology - 1,482 words
    Evolution Of Technology Evolution Of Technology Primitive men cleaved their universe into friends and enemies and responded with quick, deep emotion to even the mildest threats emanating from outside the arbitrary boundary. With the rise of chiefdoms and states, this tendency became institutionalized, war was adopted as an instrument of policy of some of the new societies, and those that employed it best became - tragically - the most successful. The evolution of warfare was an autocatalytic reaction that could not be halted by any people, because to attempt to reverse the process unilaterally was to fall victim. -E.O. Wilson, On Human Nature As every day passes we are become more and more a ...
    Related: communication technology, evolution, information technology, information technology it, technology
  • How Do Psychologists Attempt To Explain The Origins Of Prejudice - 1,390 words
    How Do Psychologists Attempt To Explain The Origins Of Prejudice? HOW DO PSYCHOLOGISTS ATTEMPT TO EXPLAIN THE ORIGINS OF PREJUDICE? DO THEY OFFER SOCIETY ANY HOPE THAT IT MAY BE REDUCED? BY JON SALECLEMENTS. Ethnocentrism is the tendency to assume that one's culture or way of life is superior to all others. Prejudice is a negative attitude toward an entire category of individuals. Discrimination is behaviour that excludes all members of a group from certain rights, opportunities or privileges. A range of international events have recently focused attention on the issue of prejudice; increasing ethno-nationalistic tensions in former Eastern block countries, racial conflict in the Middle East, ...
    Related: prejudice, psychologists, psychodynamic approach, individual differences, reduction
  • Imperialism - 991 words
    Imperialism Imperialism is the practice by which powerful nations or peoples seek to extend and maintain control or influence over weaker nations (Freeman 2). Some people associate imperialism solely with the economic expansion of capitalist states, others reserve the term for European expansion after 1870. Imperialism and colonialism are similar in meaning and are often used interchangeably. However, there are distinctions between the two (Freeman 3). Colonialism usually implies formal political control including territorial annexation and loss of sovereignty (Jones 34). A sovereign state is one that is independent of all others. Imperialism refers more broadly to control or influence that ...
    Related: european imperialism, imperialism, scientific research, foreign trade, europeans
  • Keith Porter Is Gay - 1,941 words
    Keith Porter Is Gay As they look over the world's painful panorama of war and terror, some people conclude that it is too late, that no amount of information or activity could possibly follow through on the critical work that has already begun. But those who take that pessimistic view understand neither Mr. Gay Keith Porter nor his current rung on the ladder to total power. What follows is a call to action for those of us who care -- a large enough number to improve the physical and spiritual quality of life for the population at present and for those yet to come. On the surface, it would seem merely that his position that we should abandon the institutionalized and revered concept of democr ...
    Related: keith, porter, background information, daily lives, engaging
  • Multicultural Education - 1,666 words
    Multicultural Education Multicultural Education History/Past Challenges: One of the major goals of the American school system is to provide all children with equal educational opportunity. However, with regard to minority students, meeting this particular objective has presented a real challenge to educators as they have been confronted with the task of reshaping education in the multilingual, multicultural society that characterizes the United States. Many significant events contributed to the need of school reform. The Civil Rights movement launched by African Americans in the 1960's, which resulted in the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, triggered major social changes in the direc ...
    Related: american education, bilingual education, department of education, education programs, education system, multicultural, multicultural education
  • Orientalism - 1,715 words
    Orientalism Said describes Orientalism as, "...the generic term that I have been employing to describe the Western approach to the Orient; Orientalism is the discipline by which the Orient was (and is) approached systematically, as a topic of learning, discovery and practice". By this, Said is saying because we treated the East like a school subject, we have learned to treat the East as an inferior. Which has developed into something called Orientalism. The poets, authors and statesmen of the nineteenth-century have made Orientalism every thing that it is. They started out with the intent of learning about a civilization of people that was extremely different from ours. Their intentions were ...
    Related: princeton university, subject matter, more violent, explaining, nineteenth
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