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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: ellington

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  • Duke Ellington - 1,485 words
    Duke Ellington The Harlem Renaissance was an era full of life, excitement, and activity. The world in all aspects was in gradual recovery from the depression. The world of music was expanding, sharing its enthusiasm throughout the world. The evolution of jazz aroused the curiosity of the nation. As Blacks received their freedom, they were able to express themselves as talented individuals. Certain blacks contributed immensely to the era of jazz, for example, Duke Ellington. Ellington entered a brand-new, exciting era as he grew up. As Ellington became an adolescent, the entertainment world was undergoing rapid, change. The change was driven by the deep, persuasive shift in the American spiri ...
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  • Duke Ellington - 794 words
    Duke Ellington Duke Ellington By the time of his passing, he was considered amongst the worlds greatest composers and musicians. The French government honored him with their highest award, the Legion of Honor, while the government of the United States bestowed upon him the highest civil honor, the Presidential Medal of Freedom. He played for the royalty and for the common people and by the end of his fifty-year career, he had played over 20,000 performances worldwide. He was the Duke, Duke Ellington Edward Kennedy Ellington was born into the world on April 28, 1899 in Washington, D.C. Dukes parents Daisy Kennedy Ellington and James Edward Ellington served as ideal role models for young Duke ...
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  • Duke Ellington - 795 words
    Duke Ellington Duke Ellington Duke Ellington By the time of his passing, he was considered amongst the world's greatest composers and musicians. The French government honored him with their highest award, the Legion of Honor, while the government of the United States bestowed upon him the highest civil honor, the Presidential Medal of Freedom. He played for the royalty and for the common people and by the end of his fifty-year career, he had played over 20,000 performances worldwide. He was the Duke, Duke Ellington Edward Kennedy Ellington was born into the world on April 28, 1899 in Washington, D.C. Duke's parents Daisy Kennedy Ellington and James Edward Ellington served as ideal role model ...
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  • Duke Ellington - 876 words
    Duke Ellington Duke Ellington was one of the most influential jazz musicians ever. In a time when music was going through a transformation from a ragtime style to a jazz-blues mix, Duke was there to add his own style. He was a composer, conductor, and pianist who revolutionized the way music was written and earned the title of being the great American composer. (Williams, 51) Duke Ellington was born in Washington, D.C. in 1899. At the age of 17 he began to play professionally. Due to his love of music, Duke dropped out of high school to pursue his career as a musician in New York. He arrived in New York in 1923, where Ellington found that his plans were ruined as the job which awaited him wa ...
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  • Duke Ellington - 793 words
    Duke Ellington Duke Ellington By the time of his passing, he was considered amongst the world's greatest composers and musicians. The French government honored him with their highest award, the Legion of Honor, while the government of the United States bestowed upon him the highest civil honor, the Presidential Medal of Freedom. He played for the royalty and for the common people and by the end of his fifty-year career, he had played over 20,000 performances worldwide. He was the Duke, Duke Ellington Edward Kennedy Ellington was born into the world on April 28, 1899 in Washington, D.C. Duke's parents Daisy Kennedy Ellington and James Edward Ellington served as ideal role models for young Duk ...
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  • Duke Ellington - 795 words
    Duke Ellington Duke Ellington Duke Ellington By the time of his passing, he was considered amongst the world's greatest composers and musicians. The French government honored him with their highest award, the Legion of Honor, while the government of the United States bestowed upon him the highest civil honor, the Presidential Medal of Freedom. He played for the royalty and for the common people and by the end of his fifty-year career, he had played over 20,000 performances worldwide. He was the Duke, Duke Ellington Edward Kennedy Ellington was born into the world on April 28, 1899 in Washington, D.C. Duke's parents Daisy Kennedy Ellington and James Edward Ellington served as ideal role model ...
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  • African American Community - 3,076 words
    African American Community By 1945, nearly everyone in the African American community had heard gospel music (2). At this time, gospel music was a sacred folk music with origins in field hollers, work songs, slave songs, Baptist lining hymns, and Negro spirituals. These songs that influenced gospel music were adapted and reworked into expressions of praise and thanks of the community. Although the harmonies were similar to those of the blues or hymns in that they shared the same simplicity, the rhythm was much different. The rhythms often times had the music with its unique accents, the speech, walk, and laughter which brought along with it synchronized movements. (2) The gospel piano style ...
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  • Biography Of Langston Hughes - 940 words
    Biography Of Langston Hughes Langston Hughes was born in Joplin, Missouri, in 1902. His father, who had studied to become a lawyer, left for Mexico shortly after the baby was born. When Langston was seven or eight he went to live with his grandmother, who told him wonderful stories about Frederick Douglass and Sojourner Truth and took him to hear Booker T. Washington. She also introduced him to The Crisis, edited by W.E.B. Du Bois, who also wrote The Souls of Black Folk, young Langston's favorite book. After his grandmother died when he was twelve, Langston went to live with her friends, whom he called Auntie and Uncle Reed. Then, at age fourteen, his mother married again, and soon he accomp ...
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  • Ch Paul Whiteman A Classically Trained Violinist And Violist Who Adored Jazz But Lacked The Gift To Emulate The Uni - 1,055 words
    Ch.12 Paul Whiteman(1890-1967)= a classically trained violinist and violist who adored jazz but lacked the gift to emulate the uninhibited improvisations of the jazz musicians he admired, formed a dance band in the early twenties that played jazzy arrangements of popular and even classical melodies. Blues = a black vocal folk music, began as vocal (largely instrumental). Classical blues = based on 3 lines of text. Wild wame dont do the blues. Urban Blues = blues pieces written for publication and professional performance. W.C. Handy = father of the blues. Boggie woogie = arrived from blues (a popular piano style with the form and harmony of the blues, but a faster tempo and a dance beat. Jel ...
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  • Debbie Allen - 859 words
    Debbie Allen Debbie Allen Debbie Allen has become one of Americas brightest stars. She has spent a lifetime preparing to be famous. She lives her life by the philosophy that luck is when opportunity meets preparation. Actress, singer, dancer, director, producer Allen was born in Houston, Texas, on January 16, 1950, to a Pulitzer Prize-nominee for poetry, Vivian Allen, and a dentist, Andrew Allen. She is the third of four children (one sister and two brothers) in a family that includes Phylicia Rashad--Clare on the Cosby Show and Andrew Tex Allen--a jazz musician. At the age of three, Debbie began her dance training and, by age eight, she had set her goals of a musical theater career. Her mot ...
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  • Frank Sinatra - 667 words
    Frank Sinatra The Life and Times of Frank Sinatra By Esme Hawes Chelsea House Publishers Philadelphia 1998 Francis Albert Sinatra was born on December 12, 1915, in Hoboken, New Jersey. He later became known as Frank Sinatra and one of the greatest entertainers of his time. American singers, Bing Crosby and Billie Holiday, influenced Frank. Sinatra then developed a vocal phrasing in his music that influenced generations of popular vocalists. Sinatra anticipated the decline of big-band instrumental jazz music, and helped establish an enthusiastic climate for popular singers. One of the songs Frank Sinatra is most known for singing is the hit "My Way", which my grandfathers favorite son ...
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  • Geographic Information Systems - 1,636 words
    Geographic Information Systems Geographic information systems (GIS) technology can be used for scientific investigations, resource management, and development planning. For example, a GIS might allow emergency planners to easily calculate emergency response times and effected areas of the ocean during an oil spill based on the spills location. You may ask, what is GIS? In the strictest sense, a GIS is a computer system capable of assembling, storing, manipulating, and displaying geographically referenced information, i.e. data identified according to their locations. Practitioners also regard the total GIS as including operating personnel and the data that go into the system. A geographic in ...
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  • Jazz - 1,388 words
    Jazz When it comes to music, most people don't say they like it. People say they like heavy metal, pop, rhythm and blues, or any other type of music, since they have their own preference to what type of music they like, not just enjoying the broad area of music. One of those types of music which many enjoy is jazz. Actually right now jazz is really big and popular in Europe, and is rising in its popularity in the USA through its many forms. Jazz does have many forms, so many that some people wouldn't consider just saying they like jazz, they would say they enjoyed bebop, ragtime, blues, or other types of jazz. Jazz has survived longer than many types of music, and it has always influenced th ...
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  • Jazz - 1,397 words
    ... used a lot more in jazz combos. Bebop totally redefined the way to improvise in a song, and it is full of creative and unique musical ideas, also called "licks". Famous people such as the saxophonist Charlie Parker, the trumpeter Dizzy Gillespie, and the drummer Max Roach created bebop during the 40s and the Postwar Decades, which was definitely a big leap for jazz. This style of jazz is less restricted, and improvisation involved longer phrases, more choruses, and more emotions. Modal jazz, also called free jazz, has no rules at all. It was created during the late 50s through the 70s. Improvisation has ultimate freedom and so does the songs. A famous trumpeter named Miles Davis helped ...
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  • Jazz Music The Roots Of Our Everyday Life - 648 words
    Jazz Music- The Roots Of Our Everyday Life What is Jazz? According to the dictionary, jazz is defined as, A kind of syncopated, highly rhythmic music originated by Southern blacks in the late 19th century (Jazz 232). But, everyone should at least agree that jazz is the mother of all music, and is referred to as the only art form originating in the United States (History 101 2). America was home to immigrants from all over Europe and beyond who wished to build a new life, or just needed to escape from the old. These people, often thought of as second-class, brought their culture with them to America, expressed it musically, and changed the music world as we know it today. Most early jazz was ...
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  • John Coltrane - 1,034 words
    John Coltrane Jazz, taking its roots in African American folk music, has evolved, metamorphosed, and transposed itself over the last century to become a truly American art form. More than any other type of music, it places special emphasis on innovative individual interpretation. Instead of relying on a written score, the musician improvises. For each specific period or style through which jazz has gone through over the past seventy years, there is almost always a single person who can be credited with the evolution of that sound. From Thelonius Monk, and his bebop, to Miles Davis cool jazz, from Dizzy Gillespies big band to John Coltranes free jazz; Americas music has been developed, and re ...
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  • Josephine Baker - 1,468 words
    Josephine Baker While Jim Crow laws were reeking havoc on the lives of African Americans in the South, a massed exodus of Southern musicians, particularly from New Orleans, spread the seeds of Jazz as far north as New York City. A new genre of music produced fissures in the walls of racial discrimination thought to be impenetrable. Musicians such as Louis Armstrong, Duke Ellington, "King" Oliver and Fletcher Henderson performed to the first desegregated audiences. Duke Ellington starred in the first primetime radio program to feature an African American artist. And a quirky little girl from Missouri conquered an entire country enthralled by her dark skin, curvaceous body and dynamic personal ...
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  • Langston Hughes: A Poet Supreme - 1,197 words
    Langston Hughes: A Poet Supreme Langston Hughes: A Poet Supreme Black poetry is poetry that (1) is grounded in the black experience; (2) utilizes black music as a structural or emulative model; and (3) consciously transforms the prevailing standards of poetry through and inconoclastic and innovative use of language. No poet better carries the mantle of model and innovator the Langston Hughes, the prolific Duke Ellington of black poetry. Hughes's output alone is staggering. During his lifetime, he published over eight hundred poems. Moreover, he single-handedly defined blues poetry and is arguably the first major jazz poet. Early in his career he realized the importance of reading his poetry ...
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  • Langston Hughes: A Poet Supreme - 1,175 words
    ... the fluid, quicksilver rhythms, and the complex melodic counterpoint and harmonic daring of bebop are all achieved by a deft use of simple words, precise punctuation, and italics. The complexity of the overall composition notwithstanding, the individual parts seem too simple to be true, but Montage works so sublimely because Hughes figured out precisely how to get to the heart of the expression without bothering with or getting caught up in external floridness. The third major achievement of this poem is Hughes's mastery of nuance and control of language. He suggest the dialect without resorting to the contractions and so-called broken English that mar(k)s most dialects poetry and some ...
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  • Lena Horne - 1,390 words
    Lena Horne Lena Horne Lena Horne was born on June 30, 1917 in Brooklyn, New York. Her parents were Teddy and Edna Scottron Horne. After her father left her at the age of two in order to pursue his gambling career; her mother leaving soon after that to pursue her acting career; she went to live with her grandparents. Through her grandparents influence she became involved with organizations like the NAACP, at an early age. In 1924 she went back to live with her mother, traveling and being schooled all over the state until she was fourteen. At the age of fourteen she decided to drop out of school and go to work. Because she was talented and light skinned it was not hard for her to find a job. S ...
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