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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: american author

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  • Karen Hesse An American Author - 663 words
    Karen Hesse; An American Author A Look at the Life of Karen Hesse As children, we all had magnificent dreams and aspirations. Whether they were to walk on the moon or to discover a new plant species, dreams were the things that kept us going; kept us striving towards obtaining what we wanted. For Karen Hesse, many dreams came and went throughout her life, but the idea of becoming a published author was always instilled in her mind. Karen Hesse was born August 29, 1952 and was raised in Baltimore, Maryland. Not much is mentioned about her childhood or her family, but one source states that Hesse basically enjoyed participating in normal childhood activities such as catching lightning bugs, ta ...
    Related: american, american author, hesse, karen, health care
  • 65279i Critical Biography - 782 words
    I. Critical Biography J.D. Salinger is an American author who wrote the famous novel "The Catcher in the Rye." It was written in 1951, (encyclopedia, Pg. 60). It ranks as a minor classic. This story is popular among American high school and college students. Salinger was born in New York City in 1919. His full name is Jarome David Salinger. Salinger has written several other books in his life. Salinger wrote some later fiction that centered on the Glass Family. These books included Franny and Zooey, Rise High the Roof Beam, and Carpenters on Seymore. He writes extremely comical books. II. Synopsis The book "The Catcher in the Rye," was an interesting novel. It includes a teenage boy named Ho ...
    Related: biography, critical, j. d. salinger, american author, smart
  • 65279i Critical Biography - 782 words
    I. Critical Biography J.D. Salinger is an American author who wrote the famous novel "The Catcher in the Rye." It was written in 1951, (encyclopedia, Pg. 60). It ranks as a minor classic. This story is popular among American high school and college students. Salinger was born in New York City in 1919. His full name is Jarome David Salinger. Salinger has written several other books in his life. Salinger wrote some later fiction that centered on the Glass Family. These books included Franny and Zooey, Rise High the Roof Beam, and Carpenters on Seymore. He writes extremely comical books. II. Synopsis The book "The Catcher in the Rye," was an interesting novel. It includes a teenage boy named Ho ...
    Related: biography, critical, main character, catcher in the rye, prep
  • 65279i Critical Biography - 782 words
    I. Critical Biography J.D. Salinger is an American author who wrote the famous novel "The Catcher in the Rye." It was written in 1951, (encyclopedia, Pg. 60). It ranks as a minor classic. This story is popular among American high school and college students. Salinger was born in New York City in 1919. His full name is Jarome David Salinger. Salinger has written several other books in his life. Salinger wrote some later fiction that centered on the Glass Family. These books included Franny and Zooey, Rise High the Roof Beam, and Carpenters on Seymore. He writes extremely comical books. II. Synopsis The book "The Catcher in the Rye," was an interesting novel. It includes a teenage boy named Ho ...
    Related: biography, critical, main character, american author, david
  • Chinese Book Report - 970 words
    Chinese Book Report China Book Report Book: China Since 1945 Author: Stewart Ross (Note: This book is not described in full depth and detail but is just explained in a very general way, therefore Mahmoud Abdelkader uses The Modernization of China by Gilbert Rozman (Editor) excerpts to support his views) Type of Book: Illustrated Pages: 64 China Book Report The book China Since 1945, written by author Stewart Ross, opens in a description of the Chinese Empire in the 1900s. There it describes the terrain of the Chinese lands and thoroughly states the fact of having the Great Wall of China to keep out the barbarians at 221 B.C. The author uses a very admiring tone of the Chinese Empire and seem ...
    Related: book report, chinese, chinese empire, negative effect, communist revolution
  • Civil Disobediance - 1,093 words
    Civil Disobediance Civil Disobedience I believe that civil disobedience is justified as a method of trying to change the law. I think that civil disobedience is an expression of one's viewpoints. If someone is willing to break a law for what they believe in, more power to them! Civil disobedience is defined as, the refusal to obey the demands or commands of a government or occupying power, without resorting to violence or active measures of opposition (Webster's Dictionary). This refusal usually takes the form of passive resistance. Its usual purpose is to force concessions from the government or occupying power. Civil disobedience has been a major tactic and philosophy of nationalist moveme ...
    Related: american civil, civil disobedience, civil government, civil liberties, civil rights, civil rights legislation, civil rights movement
  • Crystal Barrey - 1,429 words
    ... fective writing about topics he is familiar with. Poe is the poster child of Ernest Hemmingways philosophy: "Only write about what you know, and then dont write too damn much." Another theme that frequents Poes literature, is the presence of a female. She is generally portrayed sympathetically and for the most part is dead, or dies in the course of the story. Ive already mentioned the "Black Cat", which features a young wife brutally murdered by her husband. "Murders in the Rue Morge" and "The Mystery of Marie Roget" were two detective style stories that featured women being killed. Yet, there can be no better example of Poes women issues as well as his own mental instability than in a s ...
    Related: crystal, william henry, cask of amontillado, francis bacon, tale
  • Edgar Allan Poe - 1,429 words
    ... ive writing about topics he is familiar with. Poe is the poster child of Ernest Hemmingways philosophy: "Only write about what you know, and then dont write too damn much." Another theme that frequents Poes literature, is the presence of a female. She is generally portrayed sympathetically and for the most part is dead, or dies in the course of the story. Ive already mentioned the "Black Cat", which features a young wife brutally murdered by her husband. "Murders in the Rue Morge" and "The Mystery of Marie Roget" were two detective style stories that featured women being killed. Yet, there can be no better example of Poes women issues as well as his own mental instability than in a short ...
    Related: allan, edgar, edgar allan, edgar allan poe, john allan
  • Edgar Allen Poe - 1,076 words
    Edgar Allen Poe Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1849) Written and Contributed by SUGABUGA456 Edgar Allan Poe was one of Americas famous poets, fiction short-story writers, and literary critics. He is known as the first master of short story form especially in tales of horror, and mystery. The work he produced was considered to be some of the most influential literary criticism of his time. His poems made him one of the most famous figures in American literary history. His influence on literature is seen in all literature books in schools everywhere. Some of his famous writings is that of "Annabel Lee"; his detective story, "The Murders in Rue Morgue"; "The Pit and the Pendulum" and "The Tell-Tale Hear ...
    Related: allen, edgar, edgar allan, edgar allan poe, edgar allen
  • Edgar Allen Poe - 1,075 words
    Edgar Allen Poe Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1849) Written and Contributed by SUGABUGA456 Edgar Allan Poe was one of America's famous poets, fiction short-story writers, and literary critics. He is known as the first master of short story form especially in tales of horror, and mystery. The work he produced was considered to be some of the most influential literary criticism of his time. His poems made him one of the most famous figures in American literary history. His influence on literature is seen in all literature books in schools everywhere. Some of his famous writings is that of "Annabel Lee"; his detective story, "The Murders in Rue Morgue"; "The Pit and the Pendulum" and "The Tell-Tale Hea ...
    Related: allen, edgar, edgar allan, edgar allan poe, edgar allen
  • Emily Dickinson - 1,573 words
    Emily Dickinson Emily Dickinson lived in an era of Naturalism and Realism (1855-1910). She lived in a period of The Civil War and the Frontier. She was affected by her life and the era she lived in. She also had many deaths in her family and thats part of the reason that she was very morbid and wrote about death. Emily Dickinson grew up in Amherst, Massachusetts in the nineteenth century. As a child she was brought up into the Puritan way of life. She was born on December 10, 1830 and died fifty-six years later. Emily lived isolated in the house she was born in; except for the short time she attended Amherst Academy and Holyoke Female Seminary. Emily Dickinson never married and lived on the ...
    Related: dickinson, emily, emily dickinson, after life, because i could not stop for death
  • Gone With The Wind - 1,448 words
    ... s head field hand. When Scarlett was attacked by the Yankee and nigger outside of Atlanta before frank died, it was Sam who saved her, Sam who took her home. He could have been killed, and was running from the law because he killed a man, but he loved the OHara family for being so good to him enough to save Scarlett. Or you could look at Mammy. She was Ellens mammy, first, and when Ellen married Gerald, she came with. Mammy brought up the girls, and was always someone to talk to, a strong post in the storm to hold on to. It was mammy who Scarlett longed to run to when she was upset, after her mother died. Mammy and Tara, that is. There were Pork, and Dicley. Pork was Geralds main man, wh ...
    Related: gone with the wind, wind, main theme, love story, volunteer
  • Great Gatsby - 692 words
    Great Gatsby The more things change, the more they stay the same "The Times They are a-Changin, or so 60's singer/songwriter Bob Dylan thought. But have we really matured enough as people to say that racism and prejudice are no longer words in the English vocabulary? Most people like to think so, but the facts paint a different picture. The novel, The Great Gatsby, by F. Scott Fitzgerald can be used to illustrate these points. In the mid-20's, when American author F. Scott Fitzgerald wrote The Great Gatsby, it was common to use words to describe African American people that today would be seen as offensive and degrading. Mainly the sole purpose of using such words were to depict African Amer ...
    Related: gatsby, great gatsby, the great gatsby, f. scott fitzgerald, white race
  • Growing Up As A Negro In The South In The Early 1900s Is Not That Easy, For Some People Tend To Suffer Different Forms Of Opp - 1,352 words
    Growing up as a Negro in the South in the early 1900s is not that easy, for some people tend to suffer different forms of oppression. In this case, it happens in the autobiography called Black Boy written by Richard Wright. The novel is set in the early part of the 1900s, somewhere in deep Jim Crow South. Richard Wright, who is obviously the main character, is also the protagonist. The antagonist is no one person in particular, for it takes many different forms called oppression in general. The main character over comes this oppression by rebelling against the common roles of the black, Jim Crow society. Richard Wrights character was affected in early childhood by the effects of societal opp ...
    Related: black people, crow south, different forms, different ways, early childhood, negro, white people
  • Hellen Keller - 1,369 words
    Hellen Keller Helen Keller was an American author who lived to educate and inspire others to become the most unique author of her time. She was a gifted woman who had exceptional writing abilities. She utilized simplistic style to correspond with all varieties of people. She wrote to inspire people and to help disabled people achieve their goals. Her writing style was full of many types of diction, syntactic devices, and patterns of imagery to exemplify her life chronicle. Keller used an unadorned tone with superb expressions and descriptions. Helen Adams Keller was born in the small town of Tuscumbia, Alabama in 1880. When she was nineteen months old she was diagnosed with scarlet fever, wh ...
    Related: helen keller, keller, first person, early years, dialog
  • Hemingway And Symbolism - 1,057 words
    Hemingway And Symbolism Ernest Hemingway and Symbolism Ernest Miller Hemingway is a well-known American author who wrote in the twentieth century. He has written several novels such as, A Farewell to Arms, For Whom the Bell Tolls, and The Old Man and the Sea. The Sun Also Rises was finished on April 1, 1926 and was published in October of 1926. The Sun Also Rises was Hemingway's expression of his own life. He had changed the names of his friends and some of the details, but the real identities of the characters were obvious to anyone in Paris. The Sun Also Rises encapsulates the angst of the post-World War I generation, know as the Lost Generation. This poignantly beautiful story of a group ...
    Related: ernest hemingway, ernest miller hemingway, hemingway, rises hemingway, symbolism
  • Huckleberry Finn - 1,520 words
    Huckleberry Finn Mark Twain The esteemed, American author, Samuel L. Clemens, better known as Mark Twain, was born in Florida, Missouri in 1835 and passed away on April 21, 1910. In 1864 Samuel Clemens adopted the pen name "Mark Twain," which is a river pilot's phrase that means two fathoms deep. When Mark was younger he loved to travel, indulging an irrepressible spirit of adventure. Plumbing his exciting life experiences, Mark Twain created the characters and plots of books which have become classic American Novels. The Adventure of Huckleberry Finn In The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn Mark Twain tells the story of an adolescent boy travelling down the Mississippi River with a runaway sla ...
    Related: adventures of huckleberry finn, finn, huck finn, huckleberry, huckleberry finn, the adventures of huckleberry finn
  • Innocence, Compassion, And Some Crazy Cliff - 1,524 words
    Innocence, Compassion, And Some 'Crazy' Cliff A novel, which has gained literary recognition worldwide, scrutiny to the point of censorship and has established a following among adolescents, The Catcher in the Rye is in its entirety a unique connotation of the preservation of innocence and the pursuit of compassion. With certain elegance the writer J.D. Salinger, substantiates the growth and perils, which lie between childhood and adulthood. Embellishing the differentiation between innocence and squalor in the grasps of society. The bridge that lies between these contrasting themes are personified through the novels protagonist, Holden Caul-field and his visualization of a cliff, which depic ...
    Related: cliff, crazy, york city, short story, yorker
  • James Baldwins Going To Meet The Man - 908 words
    James Baldwin's Going To Meet The Man One Never forgets What They are Taught James Baldwin, an African American author born in Harlem, was raised by his violent step-father, David. His father was a lay preacher who hated whites and felt that all whites would be judged as they deserve by a vengeful God (Klinkowitz and Pritchard, p.1999). Usually, the father's anger was directed toward his son through violence. Baldwin's history, in part, aids him in his insight of racism within the family. He understands that racists are not born, but rather racists' attitudes and behaviors are learned in the early stages of childhood. Baldwin's Going to Meet the Man is a perfect example of his capability to ...
    Related: james baldwin, american author, african american, early stages, torture
  • Kurt Vonnegut - 1,860 words
    Kurt Vonnegut Kurt Vonnegut, Jr. is a contemporary American author whose works have been described by Richard Giannone as comic masks covering the tragic farce that is our contemporary life (Draper, 3784). Vonnegut's life has had a number of significant influences on his works. Influences from his personal philosophy, his life and experiences, and his family are evident elements in his works. Among his comic masks are three novels: Cat's Cradle, The Sirens of Titan, and God Bless You, Mr. Rosewater. Throughout these novels, elements such as attitude, detail, narrative technique, setting, and theme can be viewed with more understanding when related to certain aspects of his life. These correl ...
    Related: kurt, kurt vonnegut, vonnegut, human life, existential philosophy
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