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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: drug trafficking

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  • Buckley Jr - 2,624 words
    ... alleviate the symptoms of glaucoma; to improve appetite dangerously reduced from AIDS. They use it as an effective medicine, yet they are technically regarded as criminals, and every year many are jailed. Although more than 75 per cent of Americans believe that marijuana should be available legally for medical purposes, the Federal Government refuses to legalize access or even to sponsor research. 2. Drugs are here to stay. The time has come to abandon the concept of a "drug-free society." We need to focus on learning to live with drugs in such a way that they do the least possible harm. So far as I can ascertain, the societies that have proved most successful in minimizing drug-related ...
    Related: buckley, war on drugs, johns hopkins, community policing, stick
  • Assassination Of Jfk - 1,703 words
    Assassination of JFK On Friday, November 22nd 1963 at 12:30 P.M. the 35th president of the United States of America, John Fitzgerald Kennedy assassinated while he rode in an open limousine though the streets of Dallas. This event, which abruptly and severely altered the course of history, it has created more controversy than any other single event. Some haunting questions remain. "Who did it?" "Why did they do it?" "How was it done?" "Was there a cover up" The official answers complied by the Warren Commission have never satisfied the majority of the world's population. In this following essay I will try to show who was responsible for the assassination of John F. Kennedy. I believe the only ...
    Related: assassination, assassination of jfk, bay of pigs invasion, john kennedy, ranking
  • Capital Puinishment - 1,670 words
    ... fers. The methods of capital punishment in use in 1997 included hanging, firing squad, electrocution, suffocation in the lethal gas chamber, and lethal injection (NCADP). The traditional execution by hanging is still used in a few states today. Death on the gallows can make for a slow and agonizing demise by strangulation if the drop is too short. Or, if the drop is too long, the head will be torn off. Two states still use the firing squad method, in which the condemned is hooded, strapped into a chair, and a target is pinned on the chest. Five marksmen take aim and fire (NCADP). During the twentieth century, electrocution has been the most widely applied form of execution in the United ...
    Related: capital punishment, albert camus, human life, violent crime, intensity
  • China And American Foreign Policy - 1,329 words
    China And American Foreign Policy China and American Foreign Policy Since the fall of the Soviet Union, the Cold War was over, making the U.S. the only superpower left in the world. This has made the international system much more tranquil, and relaxed. The only country potentially powerful besides the U.S., is China. Many Americans fear China, not only because they are communist, but also because of their huge population. Their population is 1.3 billion people, which accounts 1/5th of the worlds population. As one of the only potential superpowers in the world, it would be in the best interest of all Americans if the U.S. and China became allies, instead of enemies. Peace and development, e ...
    Related: american, american foreign, american foreign policy, china, foreign policy, foreign relations, south china
  • Cuban History - 1,542 words
    ... nd. The agrarian reform laws promulgated in its first years mainly affected U.S. sugar interests; the operation of plantations by companies controlled by non-Cuban stockholders was prohibited, and the Castro regime initially de-emphasized sugar production in favor of food crops. Break with the United States When the Castro government expropriated an estimated $1 billion in U.S.-owned properties in 1960, Washington responded by imposing a trade embargo. A complete break in diplomatic relations occurred in January 1961, and on April 17 of that year U.S.-supported and -trained anti-Castro exiles landed an invasion force in the Bay of Pigs in southern Cuba. Ninety of the invaders were killed ...
    Related: cuban, cuban government, cuban missile, cuban missile crisis, cuban revolution, history
  • Drug Legalization - 1,972 words
    Drug Legalization The debate over drugs and drug legalization is an increasingly important political issue as we proceed into the twenty-first century. It is important that we proceed into this era with a keen sense of direction on this issue. Whether we increase our current laws or we proceed in the direction legalization. It is obvious that some reformation of our current policy is needed. But, the drug legalization debate is not a issue that should only concern our political officials and law makers. It should concern all of us, since all of us are affected by the laws governing the trade and use of drugs. In this paper I will address the drug legalization debate from the view of the anti ...
    Related: drug control, drug enforcement, drug enforcement agency, drug legalization, drug policy, drug prohibition, drug trade
  • Drug Scandal - 1,029 words
    Drug Scandal An August, 1996, series in the San Jose Mercury News by reporter Gary Webb linked the origins of crack cocaine in California to the contras, a guerrilla force backed by the Reagan administration that attacked Nicaragua's Sandinista government during the 1980s. Webb's series, "The Dark Alliance," has been the subject of intense media debate, and has focused attention on a foreign policy drug scandal that leaves many questions unanswered. This electronic briefing book is compiled from declassified documents obtained by the National Security Archive, including the notebooks kept by NSC aide and Iran-contra figure Oliver North, electronic mail messages written by high-ranking Reagan ...
    Related: drug enforcement, drug smuggling, drug trafficking, scandal, assistant secretary
  • Drugs, Crime And Prohibition - 1,624 words
    ... upposed decline in illicit drug use, Anslinger started to push for even stiffer penalties. Instead of approving a new bill, the American Bar Association created a committee that was in charge of investigating the Harrison Act and the first nationwide investigation of illicit drugs. Arising from this investigation was the Narcotic Control Act, which was the most severe antidrug legislation put into affect(3). The NCA doubled the lengthy sentences of the Boggs Act, and added the death penalty in some cases. These laws also failed in extinguishing the drug epidemic. By now, most states specified that marijuana and heroin penalties should be identical, and consequently marijuana penalties we ...
    Related: crime, crime control, prohibition, violent crime, substance abuse
  • Environmental Issues Concerning Nafta - 474 words
    Environmental Issues Concerning Nafta In the early 1990's, the United States, Mexico, and Canada, all produced the North American Free Trade Agreement in an attempt to increase trade and reduce tariffs between the countries. With the creation of NAFTA, the world's largest trading bloc was formed with a population of around 400 million people in 1997. The financial figures were also outstanding in that the three countries had a combined $8 trillion the same year. There have been many concerns since the initiation of the agreement. Issues over cheap labor, environmental concerns, highway safety, and who will gain control over the economy, have been facing officials for some time now. A major i ...
    Related: environmental, environmental concerns, environmental issues, nafta, illegal drug
  • Foreign Affairs In 20th - 767 words
    Foreign Affairs In 20th My personal view on this issue is that America should pay equal attention to both domestic and foreign affairs. You cannot just focus on one without the other because they intermingle into the same issue. For instance, Americas businesses have branched out all across the world and if those places of business are not ensured safety then both the economy of that particular country as well as our own is affected. Adding onto that, America is not a self-sufficient country. We have to import oil, food, and much of our merchandise. The days of when Americans worked in sweatshops is long gone, for we now usually rely on overpopulated and underdeveloped countries to do the di ...
    Related: foreign affairs, american life, main problem, jewish community, jewish
  • Gangs - 1,599 words
    GANGS OVERVIEW OF GANGS Originally the word gang had no negative connotation. In Old English, gang simply referred to a "number of people who went around together-a group." Today a gang can be defined in four basic ways: an organized group with a leader a unified group that usually remains together during peaceful times as well as times of conflict a group whose members show unity through clothing, language a group whose activities are criminal or threatening to the larger society. Gangs are one of the results of poverty, discrimination and urban deterioration. Some experts believe that young people, undereducated and without access to good jobs, become frustrated with their lives and jo ...
    Related: gang violence, street gang, civil rights movement, civil rights, ghetto
  • Gangs - 1,599 words
    GANGS OVERVIEW OF GANGS Originally the word gang had no negative connotation. In Old English, gang simply referred to a "number of people who went around together-a group." Today a gang can be defined in four basic ways: an organized group with a leader a unified group that usually remains together during peaceful times as well as times of conflict a group whose members show unity through clothing, language a group whose activities are criminal or threatening to the larger society. Gangs are one of the results of poverty, discrimination and urban deterioration. Some experts believe that young people, undereducated and without access to good jobs, become frustrated with their lives and jo ...
    Related: gang violence, street gang, abuse neglect, old english, kentucky
  • Gangs - 1,599 words
    GANGS OVERVIEW OF GANGS Originally the word gang had no negative connotation. In Old English, gang simply referred to a "number of people who went around together-a group." Today a gang can be defined in four basic ways: an organized group with a leader a unified group that usually remains together during peaceful times as well as times of conflict a group whose members show unity through clothing, language a group whose activities are criminal or threatening to the larger society. Gangs are one of the results of poverty, discrimination and urban deterioration. Some experts believe that young people, undereducated and without access to good jobs, become frustrated with their lives and jo ...
    Related: gang violence, street gang, new mexico, world war ii, difficulty
  • Have We Lost The War On Drugs - 1,537 words
    Have we lost the War on Drugs? The War on Drugs officially started in 1972 with President Nixon declaring that drug law enforcement was not strict enough. To enforce the laws of the original Harrison Act, a new and intensified plan was to be enacted. The war reached its peak during the Reagan and Bush administrations, in which $67 billion was spent in enforcement of drug laws. The plan had worked relatively well until near the end of the Bush administration and drug use overall was down. But the Clinton administration has not been as effective and it is time to determine what our next course of action will be regarding drug enforcement. Prisons are becoming increasingly overcrowded and many ...
    Related: dangerous drugs, drug abuse, drug enforcement, drug laws, drug offenders, drug policy, drug problem
  • Have We Lost The War On Drugs - 1,455 words
    ... uth America. He made the decision to invade Panama, and arrest Manuel Noriega, a notorious General that was helping to aid drug trafficking from South America. American troops surrounded Noriega and he surrendered, he was arrested and brought to trial in the United States where he was convicted of a variety of charges ("George Bush" 4). Which include "cocaine trafficking, racketeering, and money laundering, marking the first time in history that a U.S. jury had convicted a foreign head of state of criminal charges" (Noriega 1). George Bushs plan to fight drugs was also somewhat effective. Cocaine use was down 21% over his administration (Check 2) and down 80% overall from 1985 until the ...
    Related: drug abuse, drug enforcement, drug free america, drug policy, drug problem, drug trafficking, drug war
  • Juveniles In Prison - 985 words
    Juveniles In Prison Juveniles in Adult Prisons Term Project Abstract A deep look into juveniles in adult prisons. Touch bases on several smaller issues that contribute to juveniles being in and effects of adult prisons. The United States Bureau of Prisons handles two hundred and thirty-nine juveniles and their average age is seventeen. Execution of juveniles, The United States is one of only six countries to execute juveniles. There are sixty-eight juveniles sitting on death row for crimes committed as juveniles. Forty-three of those inmates are minorities. People, who are too young to vote, drink alcohol, or drive are held to the same standard of responsibility as adults. In prisons, they a ...
    Related: federal prison, juvenile court, juvenile justice, prison system, death row
  • Legalization Of Narcotics - 1,357 words
    Legalization of Narcotics Narcotics, or drugs, are substances that affect the bodys functions. They can stimulate the mind, make people depressed, or make them hyper. Marijuana, heroin, LSD, PCP, cocaine, and anabolic steroids are all considered narcotics. Narcotics are illegal in the U.S. Even though drugs are illegal, about 12 million people use them anyway. Many strict laws have been passed against drugs but they seem to have little affect. People still decide to sell or use drugs for recreational purpose. This is why narcotics should be legalized. Before 1914, it was legal to make, sell, or use any type of drugs. Many of the drugs were used for medicinal use. This was before people found ...
    Related: legalization, first offense, pure food, prescription drugs, depressed
  • Legalizing Marijuana - 1,374 words
    Legalizing Marijuana Cannabis sativa or marijuana has been cultivated for over 5,000 years. The plant spreads like milkweed and will eventually run out any other plants nearby. In the wild, or grown with care marijuana can grow to be 3 - 20 feet high. The plant itself can be used for rope, material, medicine or for smoking. But, whatever way you choose to use this plant, it is illegal. It was made a law in the early 1900's that it was illegal to smoke, eat, or get high from this plant. The plant's only legal use was for rope and materials. Even this was controlled by the government though. In the 1960's and 1970's a group of youth stereotyped as Hippies were using marijuana on a regular basi ...
    Related: legalize marijuana, legalizing, legalizing marijuana, marijuana, economic times
  • Luxembourg Location Luxembourg Is Located In Europe And Is Bordered By Belgium, Germany And France On A Map, It Is Located At - 990 words
    LUXEMBOURG Location Luxembourg is located in Europe and is bordered by Belgium, Germany and France. On a map, it is located at 50 N latitude and 6 E longitude. Luxembourg is very small. It is only 998 square miles, which is roughly the size of Orange County, California. All the country is inhabited, with most people living in the southern part. The Flag The flag of Luxembourg was adopted in 1845. The colors come from the Coat of Arms of Luxembourg and are red, white and blue. The flag is simply three horizontal stripes from top to bottom. The Land and People Luxembourg has two distinct regions. The Ardennes, or northern region, is mountainous. The Bon Pays, or southern region, is mostly fert ...
    Related: france, germany, location, after world, local government
  • Marijuana - 1,482 words
    ... stimulate appetite. In asthma patients, several studies have shown that THC acts as a bronchodilator and reserves bronchial constriction (Rosenthal 68). In treating epilepsy, marijuana is used to prevent both grande mal and other epileptic seizures in some patients. Marijuana also limits the muscle pain and spasticity caused by multiple sclerosis and it relieves tremor and unsteady gait. Lastly, marijuana has been clinically shown to be effective in relieving muscle spasm and spasticity (Rosenthal 69). History of Marijuana Laws The hemp plant was once a widely cultivated plant in the New World by settlers. It has been known for centuries that the fiber from the hemp plant is very useful ...
    Related: legalizing marijuana, marijuana, marijuana illegal, marijuana laws, drug war
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