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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: drug testing

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  • Drug Testing - 1,601 words
    Drug Testing Drug testing is a laboratory procedure that looks for evidence of drug consumption by analyzing urine, blood, and hair samples. If tested, you must provide a sample in front of an observer to make sure that it is not tampered with. Samples are then sent to a laboratory for analysis, after which the employer is notified of the results (Wodell 1). Exactly who should be subject to the new trend of mandatory drug tests, is the big question being raised among businesses, schools, athletes and federal government employees. Businesses feel that random drug testing of their employees will create higher productivity, save on health care costs, improve employee turnover, prevent less acci ...
    Related: drug and alcohol abuse, drug testing, illicit drug, testing, pope john paul
  • Drug Testing - 1,438 words
    ... ays Morphine 2 to 4 days Methamphetamine 2 to 4 days Valium 30 days (Bina 124) Today many companies are doing what the FBI has been doing for years, using hair follicle testing as a means of drug screening. Hair follicle testing is a drug testing method that is perhaps, less demeaning, less invasive, and less likely to be tampered with than the well-known urine test. Although, it is more reliable than urine testing it has its problems that need to be addressed. It is necessary for one to understand how hair grows to be able to understand the testing procedure. Hair grows within a small cavity known as the hair follicle. Hair growth occurs when cells divide in the matrix near the bottom o ...
    Related: drug abuse, drug testing, testing, illegal drugs, legal issues
  • Drug Testing - 1,153 words
    Drug Testing The ethics of drug testing has become an increased concern for many companies in the recent years. More companies are beginning to use it and more people are starting more to have problems with it. The tests are now more than ever seen as a way to stop the problems of drug abuse in the workplace. This brings up a very large question. Is drug testing an ethical way to decide employee drug use? It is also very hard to decide if the test is an invasion of employee privacy. The ethical status of workplace drug testing can be expressed as a question of competing interests, between the employers right to use testing to reduce drug related harms and maximize profits, over against the e ...
    Related: drug abuse, drug testing, testing, right to privacy, illegal drugs
  • Drug Testing - 1,446 words
    Drug Testing Drug testing in the United States began with the explosive use of illegal drugs, in order to curb drug abuse. This began during the Vietnam War with drug use at a climax. In general, Drug testing is a way to detect illegal drug use and deter it, usually by Urinalysis. Drug testing in the United States violates a citizens right to unreasonable search and seizures along with jeopardizing ones freedom. Drug testing is not only an unreliable invasion of a persons privacy but it assumes that one is guilty before submitting to the test. Drug testing began to take place in the mid 1960s when drugs like Marijuana, hallucinogens and other drugs were becoming widespread (Stencel, pp.201). ...
    Related: drug abuse, drug control, drug free workplace, drug test, drug testing, illegal drug, national drug
  • Drug Testing - 1,395 words
    ... obable cause can also lead to the absence of Equal protection under the law, the Fourteenth Amendment (Holtorf, 135). "The Fourteenth Amendment was cited as protection against selection of a group of athletes for testing by the National Collegiate Athletic Association without demonstrating a likelihood that drug use was prevalent in that population" (Holtorf, 136). Drug tests today are considerably weak. Mistakes and errors swarm the vast business of drug testing. "Clinical laboratories are not experienced with the special requirements for specimen collection, analysis, storage, documentation, transport, and handling" (McBay, 33B). Often times, simple mistakes such as mislabeling or repo ...
    Related: drug abuse, drug administration, drug test, drug testing, drug treatment, food and drug administration, illicit drug
  • Drug Testing And Corporate Responsibility - 1,035 words
    Drug Testing And Corporate Responsibility Drug Testing and Corporate Responsibility: The Ought Implies Can Argument Drug testing has become a hot topic under the microscope recently. The problem is the question whether or not it is morally wrong to test employees for illegal drug use. In order to justify drug testing in the work place one must look to rights, among other things, to determine what sorts of controls are morally permissible. In order to really determine whether or not drug testing is needed one must evaluate the connection between drug testing and the prevention of drug related harm. One theory that that many people use to justify the morality of Drug testing in the work place ...
    Related: corporate, corporate responsibility, drug abuse, drug test, drug testing, illegal drug, testing
  • Aids Test On Animal - 1,191 words
    Aids Test On Animal Aids Testing on Animals Between 25 and 50 million animals are killed in American laboratories each year, this include mice, rats, cats, ferrets, monkey, and etc.(American Anti-Vivisection Society) Since the medical skill has been developed, numbers of drugs have been invented to fight the diseases that human beings get. In order to make sure that those medicine works, the medicines need to be tested on animals first. When a new disease is found, thousands of animals are put in the laboratory to test on the new medicine. And during the past decade, the new disease, Aids, is found. Is it time again for millions of animals to sacrifice their lives and have no right for their ...
    Related: aids, animal experimentation, animal rights, veterinary medicine, university school
  • Air Traffic Strike - 4,516 words
    ... emands rested upon prevailing norms of workers' interests and power. Since World War II, labor leaders have placed a disproportionate amount of emphasis on economic gains, and the collective bargaining process has gravitated toward these areas. At the same time, management has carefully guarded its prerogatives from the bargaining process.24 In this context, it seems likely that in envisioning a future strike, controllers felt that wages could and should be one aspect of it. Yet wages were not the decisive factor for most, and their other demands, derived from a far more vital, ideological interest than economic gains, evoked their passionate and surprisingly unified response. Individual ...
    Related: strike, traffic, traffic control, traffic controllers, worlds apart
  • Anabolic Steroids - 1,862 words
    Anabolic Steroids Anabolic Steroid Use in the Olympics Canadian track star Ben Johnson was denied his gold medal in the 1988 Olympics after he tested positive for anabolic steroids. This incident sparked worldwide attention to the extent of anabolic steroid use. To date, the International Olympic Committee has barred the use of seventeen anabolic steroids. Other organizations, including The National Football League, National Collegiate Athletic Associations International Amateur Athletic Federation, and the International Federation of Body Builders have followed suit. Athletes and non-athletes alike are still abusing anabolic steroids to excel in sports. Anabolic steroids belong to a group o ...
    Related: anabolic, anabolic steroids, steroid use, steroids, works cited
  • Athletes As Role Models - 1,023 words
    ... eion, but he never really liked that part of him so he changed his ways. Deion spent hours passing out food to the people in his community. Sanders is faithful to his community and he is also faithful to God. Deion is a dedicated Christian (Baker 1D). This shows how caring, giving, and unselfish he is as a person. Our society needs these types of role models for people to look up to. One issue that seems to come up quite often with the mention of athletes is Drugs. Of all the major athlete drug testing programs, only the NBA does not test for marijuana, because the NBA drug policy does not include marijuana in its list or banned drugs(Athletes With). This is probably the main reason they ...
    Related: professional athletes, role model, drug testing, peer pressure, incident
  • Athletes In Trouble - 1,062 words
    Athletes In Trouble Do athletes engage in more deviance than non-athletes? In the study of athletes and drugs, one major topic that was discussed was the use of drugs by athletes at all levels. With much controversy dealing with the issue of drug testing in high school, college and professional sports, many people are debating whether or not the use of drugs is a problem in the athletic system. With the problems of drugs appearing in the world of sports, many parents believe that if they place their children into a sport or any other extracurricular activity at an early age they will be spared from the world of drug use and maintain better grades in the long- run. Little do they know that st ...
    Related: college athletes, student athletes, enhancing drugs, drug testing, consuming
  • Athletes In Trouble - 1,084 words
    ... the sport or even the school may take place. Theres a belief that the use of illegal drugs and performance-enhancing drugs, and abuse of alcohol constitute a threat to the integrity of intercollegiate athletics. It also creates a danger to the health and the careers of the student-athlete. As soon as a student athlete joins and decides to participate in an inter-collegiate team, the war begins for the coaches and their staff to keep their players on the right track and not let them get caught up in the state of mind that every athlete is more likely to engage in the drug abuse than non-athletes. And also that drugs are not the answer to a lot of their questions. To prevent the problem a ...
    Related: college athletes, student athletes, steroid use, football players, odds
  • Cocaine - 1,399 words
    Cocaine Cocaine When you reach into the refrigerator for a Coca-Cola, do you ever wonder where it got its name? You might be surprised to find out! When coke was created 120 years ago, it contained cocaine (Bayer 27). At the time scientists did not realize that cocaine was addictive and dangerous. Scientists today know that cocaine is among the strongest stimulants known, and trying the drug even one time can cause heart attack, stroke, and even death. Even the most in shape athlete could die from one use (Bayer 26). The history of coca leaves began hundreds of years ago in South America. The Indians of Peru and Bolivia chewed coca leaves so that they could work hard in high altitudes and ne ...
    Related: cocaine, drug testing, human body, save lives, tasks
  • Cocaine - 1,412 words
    Cocaine Cocaine is an alkaloid found in leaves of a South American shrub. It is a powerfully reinforcing stimulant. The drug induces a sense of exhilaration in the user primarily by blocking the dopamine from going into your brain. Life-long happiness will be genetically pre-programmed. "Peak experiences" will become a natural part of everyday mental health. Cocaine, alas, offers merely a tragically delusive short-cut. Before Columbian times, the coca leaf was reserved for Inca royalty. The natives subsequently used it for mystical, religious, social, nutritional and medicinal purposes. They exploited its stimulant properties to ward off fatigue and hunger, enhance endurance, and to promote ...
    Related: cocaine, human experience, sherlock holmes, drug testing, wonderful
  • Computer Science Government Intervention Of The Internet During The Past Decade, Our Society Has Become Based Solely On The A - 1,514 words
    ... ns of encoding data so that only someone with the proper "key" can decode it. "Why do you need PGP (encryption)? It's personal. It's private. And it's no one's business but yours. You may be planning a political campaign, discussing our taxes, or having an illicit affair. Or you may be doing something that you feel shouldn't be illegal, but is. Whatever it is, you don't want your private electronic mail (E-mail) or confidential documents read by anyone else. There's nothing wrong with asserting your privacy. Privacy is as apple-pie as the Constitution. Perhaps you think your E-mail is legitimate enough that encryption is unwarranted. If you really are a law-abiding citizen with nothing t ...
    Related: computer science, government intervention, intervention, science, solely, u.s. government
  • Control As Enterprise: Reflections On Privatization And Criminal Justice - 2,820 words
    Control As Enterprise: Reflections On Privatization And Criminal Justice Thank you very much for the welcome, and for giving my talk. When the Fraser Institute called me last year, they rang up and said they were having a conference and we would like to invite you, and I thought I think you have the wrong person. Basically, everybody else there, except myself and one person from Nova Scotia, were in favour of privatization and very strongly in favour of it, especially with respect to prisons. It was actually very educational and interesting to engage in that debate. First of all I would like to thank you very much for the invitation and to wish you all the best with your new programme. I am ...
    Related: crime control, criminal, criminal justice, justice system, privatization
  • Control Of Internet - 1,523 words
    ... the proper "key" can decode it. "Why do you need" encryption? "It's personal. It's private. And it's no one's business but yours" (Laberis). You may be planning a political campaign, discussing our taxes, or having an illicit affair. Or you may be doing something that you feel shouldn't be illegal, but it is. Whatever it is, you don't want your private electronic mail or confidential documents read by anyone else. There's nothing wrong with asserting your privacy. Perhaps you are not really concerned about encrypting your e-mail because you believe that you have nothing to hide. I mean you havent broken the law in any way, right? Well then why not just write letters on postcards instead ...
    Related: online available, data encryption, the intended, bystander, decoding
  • Creatine Used In Sport - 1,464 words
    Creatine Used In Sport Creatine Used in Sport Throughout time, humans have had a fascination with being excellent at what they do, and athletics have been no exception. Many substances exist, and many have been criticized and analyzed for their safety, legality, and morality for athletes. With t banning of steroids from competitive sports, and the implementation of random drug testing in most sports, most athletes, professional, recreational, and would-be professionals are hoping to gain an edge. More recently, one such edge has been discover , and it has found itself in locker rooms across the country, in the hands of these athletes, and all the while, and probably more importantly, in the ...
    Related: creatine, england journal, professional athletes, american family, trends
  • Drug Testin In The Workplace - 1,397 words
    ... on or probable cause can also lead to the absence of Equal protection under the law, the Fourteenth Amendment (Holtorf, 135). The Fourteenth Amendment was cited as protection against selection of a group of athletes for testing by the National Collegiate Athletic Association without demonstrating a likelihood that drug use was prevalent in that population (Holtorf, 136). Drug tests today are considerably weak. Mistakes and errors swarm the vast business of drug testing. Clinical laboratories are not experienced with the special requirements for specimen collection, analysis, storage, documentation, transport, and handling (McBay, 33B). Often times, simple mistakes such as mislabeling or ...
    Related: drug abuse, drug administration, drug test, drug testing, drug treatment, food and drug administration, illicit drug
  • Drugs And Their Effects On Business - 1,033 words
    ... nt raband, with or without the help of drug sniffing dogs. A more discrete way the companies search down drug users is by hiring undercover agents that entrap employees into using drugs. Catching more secretive drug users with drugs on them, because they a re clever or are just weekend users of drugs is more difficult. Companies have to physically search the employee's body which raises a lot of controversy. Urine testing gives rise to most discontent because of its humiliating way of getting a sample. B lood testing has its own inhereat problems because of the discomfort of a needle extracting blood. Because of the problems of conventional testing for controlled substances in the body's ...
    Related: drug problem, drug testing, drug treatment, drugs, long term effects, term effects
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