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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: drug problem

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  • Buckley Jr - 2,713 words
    1. WM. F. BUCKLEY JR. Last summer WFB was asked by the New York Bar Association to make a statement to the panel of lawyers considering the drug question. He made the following statement: We are speaking of a plague that consumes an estimated $75 billion per year of public money, exacts an estimated $70 billion a year from consumers, is responsible for nearly 50 per cent of the million Americans who are today in jail, occupies an estimated 50 per cent of the trial time of our judiciary, and takes the time of 400,000 policemen--yet a plague for which no cure is at hand, nor in prospect. Perhaps you, ladies and gentlemen of the Bar, will understand it if I chronicle my own itinerary on the sub ...
    Related: buckley, illegal drug, medical care, federal government, princeton
  • Buckley Jr - 2,624 words
    ... alleviate the symptoms of glaucoma; to improve appetite dangerously reduced from AIDS. They use it as an effective medicine, yet they are technically regarded as criminals, and every year many are jailed. Although more than 75 per cent of Americans believe that marijuana should be available legally for medical purposes, the Federal Government refuses to legalize access or even to sponsor research. 2. Drugs are here to stay. The time has come to abandon the concept of a "drug-free society." We need to focus on learning to live with drugs in such a way that they do the least possible harm. So far as I can ascertain, the societies that have proved most successful in minimizing drug-related ...
    Related: buckley, war on drugs, johns hopkins, community policing, stick
  • The Psychological And Physical Aspects Of Drug Abuse In Today's Adolescence - 1,423 words
    "The Psychological And Physical Aspects Of Drug Abuse In Today'S Adolescence" "The psychological and physical aspects of drug abuse in today's adolescence" Unfortunately the abuse of illegal drugs is not uncommon in today's adolescent communities. Many teenagers today use illicit drugs as a way to deal with everyday pressures such as school, after school jobs, sports activities, domestic violence and peer pressure. Adolescence has been found to be a period of weakening bonds with parents and strengthening bonds with peers (Flay, 1994). Numerous states have experienced an increase in drug related deaths (http://www.usdoj.gov/dea/stats). More than 1 in 10 of today's youth aged 12-17 were curre ...
    Related: abuse, adolescence, drug abuse, drug addiction, drug problem, gateway drug, psychological
  • A Grave Decision - 961 words
    A Grave Decision A Grave Decision I come to you today not as a politician looking to say the right things or as an ex drug users looking to lecture you on the disastrous effects of drug use. But I do come to you today as a terribly concerned citizen of this great nation. As you are probably are aware of our government is pondering the idea and is leaning toward legalizing such illicit drugs as marijuana, cocaine, and heroin. There are those in this nation on both sides of the spectrum in this great debate. Some believe that the government should not be able to control what we put in our bodies and others like myself believe that the legalization of street drugs could have irreversible reperc ...
    Related: grave, great debate, criminal acts, drug abuse, prohibition
  • Alcoholism Is A Wideranging And Complex Disease That Heavily Plagues Society Drinking Is Defined As The Consumption Of A Liqu - 1,012 words
    ... igestive enzymes, which can irritate the stomach wall, producing heartburn, nausea, gastritis, and ulcers. The stomach of a chronic drinker loses the ability to adequately move food and expel it into the duodenum, leaving some food always in the stomach, causing sluggish digestion and vomiting. Alcohol may also inflame the small and large intestine (Overview 4). Moderate daily drinking may be good for the heart, but for many the risks outweigh the benefits. Even one binge may produce irregular heartbeats, and an alcohol abuser experience increased risk of high blood pressure, heart attacks, heart arrhythmia, and heart disease. Alcohol may cause cardiomyopathy (a disease of the heart musc ...
    Related: alcoholism, consumption, drinking, heart disease, heavily, legal drinking
  • American Beauty - 1,034 words
    American Beauty Its Just a Couch!!!!!! Americans are caught up in the belief that what we are is what we own. There is a superficial nature to our society. We are nothing more than peacocks walking around strutting our feathers marked with price tags and brand names. The suburbs are a nesting ground for all of this fictitiousness. When Lester Byrnham introduces himself to his audience, he finds himself amidst the cradle of this fakeness. The movie American Beauty starts by accompanying Lester Byrnham through one day of his boring and mundane life. Lester is trapped amongst fake and superficial people. He sees the trouble with his family, and yet he avoids it because he does not believe in di ...
    Related: american, american beauty, real estate, middle class, buying
  • Breakthroughs In American Jazz - 618 words
    Breakthroughs In American Jazz Breakthroughs in American Jazz The backdrop was New Orleans in the late 19th century, a growing port city with a diverse population of African Americans, whites, displaced French settlers, and immigrants from the West Indies and South America. This hodgepodge of cultures mixed European influenced popular music, such as ragtime, with tradition African music creating the hybrid musical style known as jazz. Jazz, bold and beautiful, in its purest sense demands high instrumentation mastery, creativity, and improvisation combined with low rehearsal and repetition. Unlike opera or symphony music, jazz dates back a little more than a century ago and finds all of its m ...
    Related: american, american jazz, american life, american music, free jazz, jazz, jazz music
  • Crack In The Box By Hamill - 915 words
    Crack In The Box By Hamill To summarize the essay, Crack in the Box, you have to understand the writer and what he is saying, or the point he is trying to make. In the article Crack in the Box The writer Pete Hammil compares the difference between Television and the common street drug known as Crack Cocaine. The essay starts with a story of a young lady hooked on drugs and living in poverty with a couple of children. The children are almost hypnotized by the television as Hamill is interviewing her. As Pete Hammil is walking back to his office he is thinking about all the drug problems in the world and how there affecting society today and comes to a claim which is a claim of cause. Hamills ...
    Related: crack, george bush, drug problem, society today, medellin
  • Drug And Alchohol - 528 words
    Drug And Alchohol The first meeting I attended was an AA and a NA meeting. At first, I was very nervous attending it because I didn't know what to expect. I always had the impression that all people who attended these meetings were typical people that you see in bars with long hair, and beards; but I was wrong. They look normal just like you and me. There were young people, and middle-aged people. Some of them I never would have expected that they were alcoholics or drug addicts. Both meetings seemed to be very similar to me. They both introduced themselves the same way, for example hi my name is Gino and I'm an alcoholic, or I'm addicted to cocaine. They both sat in a group and discussed th ...
    Related: alchohol, drug addicts, drug problem, family problems, young people
  • Drug Epidemic - 514 words
    Drug Epidemic I read this question and immediately one answer came to mind, yes we are in the midst of a drug epidemic. Drugs seem to be a huge problem to this present date. You can walk down any side street in New York City and buy pot or several other drugs. I would call that an epidemic. Everywhere you look you see the issue of drugs being brought up, and the topic of legalizing certain drugs. Is this just another phase the United States is going through or are they really thinking about legalizing pot? Legalizing pot would make people open to a drug, I don't know if everyone understands. This is a drug. An illegal drug at the moment. It kills brain cells and can lead to more dangerous si ...
    Related: drug problem, epidemic, illegal drug, legalizing marijuana, york city
  • Drug Legalization - 393 words
    Drug Legalization Essay Questions April 28, 2001 Drug Legalization The debate over drug legalization has existed for decades. It is a hot topic for discussion among young and old alike. While many different opinions have been argued over, most of America can agree on one thing--we have a serious drug problem in the United States. Solutions to this problem have been tossed about; we should create harsher laws for drug users, we should legalize the less dangerous drugs in society, we should legalize all drugs and set standards and regulations regarding their use and distribution. The war on drugs was popularized during the Reagan administration and has been a political mantra for conservative ...
    Related: drug laws, drug legalization, drug offenders, drug problem, legalization
  • Drug Legalization - 784 words
    Drug Legalization Just say no? This is not exactly the philosophy that the vast majority of the United States population tends to follow. Drugs have become a routine aspect of everyday life in the United States. Neither a gigantic metropolis nor a minute town have gone without feeling the everlasting effects of drugs. Drug use has always posed a major dilemma for America to overcome. The banning of illegal drugs takes many back to the days of the Prohibition problems involving the banishment of alcohol. Prohibition obviously did not work in the 1920s, and some modern day people feel that making drugs legal would solve the constantly rising drug problem. In his article Facing up to Drugs: Is ...
    Related: drug legalization, drug problem, drug smuggling, legalization, writing techniques
  • Drug Offenders Made Harden Criminals - 621 words
    Drug Offenders Made Harden Criminals For John Russell it was just another ordinary night. At 2:00 A.M. he was calmly sleeping. He arose to a cracking noise outside; just then the police came crashing into the house. They ransack his house and found a 3-ounce bag of marijuana. In his underwear only, he is cuffed and taken to jail. In the meantime his wife and two kids huddle in the bedroom scarred to death. Was it all necessary? Is the pursuit of marijuana really so important that a family has to be terrorized and broken apart. Mr. Russell is now serving a five sentence in prison. In an effort to make a few extra dollars for his family, he has now missed out on many things. He had to miss his ...
    Related: criminals, drug offenders, drug problem, harden, the manager
  • Drugs And Alcohol - 1,331 words
    ... aches the brain in 15 to 30 seconds while smoked heroin reaches the brain in 7 to 10 seconds. Once the person begins using heroin, he/she quickly develops a tolerance to the drug and needs more and more to get the same effects. "Heroin is named after the German word for hero, heroisch" (Heroin, 1/2). The substitute of Heroin, Methadone, "was initially christened Dolphine in honor of Adolf Hitler" (1/2). After, in 1897, Bayer advertised Heroin as "the sedative for coughs" (1/2). According to Health Organization (see also Appendix 20),  Heroin is sometimes used in combination with other drugs. Therefore one person could have a heroin mention and a mention of another drug during the ...
    Related: alcohol, alcohol and drugs, drug abuse, drug dependence, drug problem, drugs, drugs and alcohol
  • Drugs And Their Effects On Business - 1,068 words
    Drugs And Their Effects On Business Drugs are used heavily for recreational purposes. It is becoming more common for addicts to get high at work. Stoned workers are inefficient and are costing companies millions in accidents and los t productivity. Searches to catch users have raised questions of the right to privacy. The problem has become so big that companies have banded together to form rehabilitation programs to help the affected workers. Drug use affects employees for one re ason or another in every position of a company, and this greatly reduces the efficiency of those employees, and this has prompted companies to initiate illegal searches, which question the rights of employees, and ...
    Related: adverse effects, drug abuse, drug problem, drugs, drugs and alcohol
  • Drugs And Their Effects On Business - 1,033 words
    ... nt raband, with or without the help of drug sniffing dogs. A more discrete way the companies search down drug users is by hiring undercover agents that entrap employees into using drugs. Catching more secretive drug users with drugs on them, because they a re clever or are just weekend users of drugs is more difficult. Companies have to physically search the employee's body which raises a lot of controversy. Urine testing gives rise to most discontent because of its humiliating way of getting a sample. B lood testing has its own inhereat problems because of the discomfort of a needle extracting blood. Because of the problems of conventional testing for controlled substances in the body's ...
    Related: drug problem, drug testing, drug treatment, drugs, long term effects, term effects
  • Drugs In The Family - 1,300 words
    Drugs In The Family THE FAMILY AND DRUG ABUSE The purpose of this piece of writing is not to compare the different methods of approaching drug prevention, or say what methods are not working. It is to simply state that the more the family takes action or gets involved with each others live, problems such as drug abuse will become obsolete. Many different attempts to lower the drug rate have been in placed by society. But despite years of anti drug campaigns within the school and media, drug abuse amongst teenagers in society continues to rise. At home drug testing and emphasis on anti drugs within the family will prove to lower the use of illegal drugs amongst teens. More and more teenagers ...
    Related: drug abuse, drug and alcohol abuse, drug problem, drug testing, drugs, illegal drugs, war on drugs
  • Drugs Legalization - 620 words
    Drugs Legalization Although it is clear that society is unhappy with current efforts to stop illegal drug smuggling, illegal drug use and distribution, no one seems to know what should be done. With drug use and drug related crime on the rise, some Americans argue that current drug law is too easy on drug offenders. Society at large asks, "Can we ever stop illegal drugs and their use?" It is a question that unfortunately has no easy answer. More and more people in America feel that if this country cannot stop illegal drugs, drugs should be legalized and controlled. Many people feel that this will eliminate the senseless violence that often goes hand in hand with illegal drugs. Although moral ...
    Related: dangerous drugs, drug abuse, drug control, drug legalization, drug offenders, drug policy, drug problem
  • Elvis - 764 words
    Elvis Elvis by Albert Goldman is a book about the life and times of the king of rock and roll. It shows how a country boy rose up and ruled the world of music, and also showed his downfall. It starts by telling about Elvis' childhood, and moving to his teenage years. Elvis was always a wholesome country boy no matter if people considered him leud, or outrageous. In fact, Elvis was discovered when he made a record for his mothers birthday, Elvis always respected his parents. Next it moves on to the first few records that Elvis cut at Sun Records with his first producer Sam Phillips. What made Elvis different from other singers was that he was "a white boy who could sing like a nigger." as Sam ...
    Related: elvis, president nixon, music industry, drug addiction, producer
  • Facism - 1,158 words
    ... n order. Hitler began to organize the SA, his Nazi storm troopers, which in Mein Kampf he referred to as " an instrument for the conduct and reinforcement of the movement's struggle for its philosophy of life." (The Rise of Hitler: A New Beginning) Realizing the liking of uniforms by the German man the SA adopted a brown-shirt outfit, with boots, swastika armband, badges and caps. The accessories on the outfit would become important because of the visual tools providing easy recognition and visibility, allowing for an increase of notoriety in and out of the Nazi party. Hitler then created a special unit that would only answer to him and be his personal body guards. The elite groups was k ...
    Related: state police, prentice hall, christian coalition, vitality, wisconsin
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