Research paper topics, free example research papers

Free research papers and essays on topics related to: drug policy

  • 33 results found, view research papers on page:
  • 1
  • 2
  • Us Drug Policy - 623 words
    Us Drug Policy Q. Would the Amsterdam model be a useful government response to hallucinogen and marijuana use in this country? Why or why not? Amsterdams coffee shops and cafes are notorious for the tolerated exchange of hashish and marijuana. This example goes completely against the moral principles underlying the United States drug policy. The United States drug policy stands by the zero tolerance rules. Our drug culture does not believe in any such thing as a use of an illegal drug, only abuse. So, why arent the Dutch facing as many drug related problems as we are? Is a more laissez-faire approach to drugs the answer? We arent winning the war on drugs. It is clear that the illegal drug us ...
    Related: drug enforcement, drug policy, drug problem, illegal drug, united states drug
  • Buckley Jr - 2,713 words
    1. WM. F. BUCKLEY JR. Last summer WFB was asked by the New York Bar Association to make a statement to the panel of lawyers considering the drug question. He made the following statement: We are speaking of a plague that consumes an estimated $75 billion per year of public money, exacts an estimated $70 billion a year from consumers, is responsible for nearly 50 per cent of the million Americans who are today in jail, occupies an estimated 50 per cent of the trial time of our judiciary, and takes the time of 400,000 policemen--yet a plague for which no cure is at hand, nor in prospect. Perhaps you, ladies and gentlemen of the Bar, will understand it if I chronicle my own itinerary on the sub ...
    Related: buckley, illegal drug, medical care, federal government, princeton
  • Buckley Jr - 2,624 words
    ... alleviate the symptoms of glaucoma; to improve appetite dangerously reduced from AIDS. They use it as an effective medicine, yet they are technically regarded as criminals, and every year many are jailed. Although more than 75 per cent of Americans believe that marijuana should be available legally for medical purposes, the Federal Government refuses to legalize access or even to sponsor research. 2. Drugs are here to stay. The time has come to abandon the concept of a "drug-free society." We need to focus on learning to live with drugs in such a way that they do the least possible harm. So far as I can ascertain, the societies that have proved most successful in minimizing drug-related ...
    Related: buckley, war on drugs, johns hopkins, community policing, stick
  • Argument Against The Legalization Of Marijuna - 1,687 words
    Argument Against The Legalization Of Marijuna Argument against the legalization of marijuna The legalization of marijuana is one of the most highly debated about subjects facing Canadians and Americans today. Advocates of legalization use two major arguments in their effort to have marijuana legalized. First, which is by far the biggest argument is that marijuana has a significant medical use. The second argument is that marijuana does not cause harm to those that smoke it. Both of these arguments can be easily discounted by the numerous studies that have been done on the effects of marijuana both medicinal and recreational. In the following paragraphs we will explore the hard facts of marij ...
    Related: drug legalization, legalization, legalize marijuana, criminal behavior, intoxicated
  • Athletes As Role Models - 1,023 words
    ... eion, but he never really liked that part of him so he changed his ways. Deion spent hours passing out food to the people in his community. Sanders is faithful to his community and he is also faithful to God. Deion is a dedicated Christian (Baker 1D). This shows how caring, giving, and unselfish he is as a person. Our society needs these types of role models for people to look up to. One issue that seems to come up quite often with the mention of athletes is Drugs. Of all the major athlete drug testing programs, only the NBA does not test for marijuana, because the NBA drug policy does not include marijuana in its list or banned drugs(Athletes With). This is probably the main reason they ...
    Related: professional athletes, role model, drug testing, peer pressure, incident
  • Bus Law - 1,409 words
    Bus law Bus law There was a time when men played for the love of the game; when competition alone satisfied the male ego. This age of basketball featured greats such as Wilt Chamberlain, Bill Russell, and Oscar Robinson. These gladiators, and those like them, battled repeatedly winning league championships, MVPs, scoring titles, and other accolades. Then, the product of James Naismith moved into an era where the love continued, but money was added. Clyde Drexler, Charles Barkely, Reggie Miller and Tim Hardaway have become league "posterboys" for commercials and shoe contracts. Each of them has continued the competitive fires burning while adding a flare of green. Today, the league seems to b ...
    Related: labor unions, economic status, free agency, deserve
  • Drug Legalazation - 1,952 words
    Drug Legalazation A LOOK AT DRUG LEGALIZATION John Hardwick Philosophy 305 Louisiana Tech University February 21, 2000 TABLE OF CONTENTS Page Table of Contents 1 A Look at Drug Legalization 2 Bibliography 9 1 2 A LOOK AT DRUG LEGALIZATION The United States is by far the richest and most powerful country in the world. We citizens take for granted luxuries that people of other countries can only dream. Yet in our society there are serious social issues that for reasons unknown are not being addressed. One of the most important issues that typical politicians are afraid to address is that of what to do with the nations illegal drug problems. Although we hear terms like The War on Drugs and Dr ...
    Related: drug abuse, drug addicts, drug laws, drug legalization, drug policy, drug prohibition, drug treatment
  • Drug Legalization - 1,972 words
    Drug Legalization The debate over drugs and drug legalization is an increasingly important political issue as we proceed into the twenty-first century. It is important that we proceed into this era with a keen sense of direction on this issue. Whether we increase our current laws or we proceed in the direction legalization. It is obvious that some reformation of our current policy is needed. But, the drug legalization debate is not a issue that should only concern our political officials and law makers. It should concern all of us, since all of us are affected by the laws governing the trade and use of drugs. In this paper I will address the drug legalization debate from the view of the anti ...
    Related: drug control, drug enforcement, drug enforcement agency, drug legalization, drug policy, drug prohibition, drug trade
  • Drug Legalization In America - 796 words
    Drug Legalization In America The issues surrounding drug legalization are complicated and sensitive. Each year drug use kills about 14,000 Americans and costs taxpayers approximately $70 billion. Drug-related illnesses and crime costs an estimated $67 billion per year. Drug use also influences worker productivity as seventy-one percent of all illicit drug users are eighteen and older and employed. Also impacted is public safety. A 1993, study from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration indicated that eighteen percent of 2,000 deaths from seven states had drugs, other than alcohol, in their systems when they died. Ironically, some citizens still support the idea of drug legalizati ...
    Related: america, drug enforcement, drug legalization, drug offenders, drug policy, drug treatment, illicit drug
  • Drugs Legalization - 620 words
    Drugs Legalization Although it is clear that society is unhappy with current efforts to stop illegal drug smuggling, illegal drug use and distribution, no one seems to know what should be done. With drug use and drug related crime on the rise, some Americans argue that current drug law is too easy on drug offenders. Society at large asks, "Can we ever stop illegal drugs and their use?" It is a question that unfortunately has no easy answer. More and more people in America feel that if this country cannot stop illegal drugs, drugs should be legalized and controlled. Many people feel that this will eliminate the senseless violence that often goes hand in hand with illegal drugs. Although moral ...
    Related: dangerous drugs, drug abuse, drug control, drug legalization, drug offenders, drug policy, drug problem
  • Drugs Transportation - 1,250 words
    Drugs Transportation On July 30, Federal agents charged twelve Delta Air Lines employees of smuggling drugs into the United States. Nine Delta Airlines workers were arrested and three others are sought as suspects in a scheme that brought 10 tons of Colombian cocaine into the U.S. via Delta flights from Puerto Rico. Over a three to four year period, employees stashed cocaine in suitcases and packed the drug into cargo containers which were then transported primarily to New York from San Juan's Munz Marin International Airport, agents said (Christopher Wren, Nine at Delta Are Seized in Smuggling of Cocaine, New York Times, July 31, 1997, p. A23; Delta workers indicted on cocaine smuggling cha ...
    Related: drug control, drug policy, drug smuggling, drug trade, drug war, drugs, national drug
  • George Bush - 1,350 words
    ... Post's Governors Guide strong families, local control, individual responsibility, and limited responsibility are principles guiding Governor Bush's major initiatives. He continually states the importance of family and education in society. He says that education is his number one priority. He believes for our society to become compassionate and responsible we must first teach children to read and comprehend. According to this page he says, "Government is necessary, but not necessarily government." His staff knows that any proposal brought before him must encourage personal responsibility, local control, and fiscal responsibility. He has encouraged a voluntary clean up program for compani ...
    Related: bush, bush administration, george bush, george w. bush, president bush
  • Have We Lost The War On Drugs - 1,537 words
    Have we lost the War on Drugs? The War on Drugs officially started in 1972 with President Nixon declaring that drug law enforcement was not strict enough. To enforce the laws of the original Harrison Act, a new and intensified plan was to be enacted. The war reached its peak during the Reagan and Bush administrations, in which $67 billion was spent in enforcement of drug laws. The plan had worked relatively well until near the end of the Bush administration and drug use overall was down. But the Clinton administration has not been as effective and it is time to determine what our next course of action will be regarding drug enforcement. Prisons are becoming increasingly overcrowded and many ...
    Related: dangerous drugs, drug abuse, drug enforcement, drug laws, drug offenders, drug policy, drug problem
  • Have We Lost The War On Drugs - 1,455 words
    ... uth America. He made the decision to invade Panama, and arrest Manuel Noriega, a notorious General that was helping to aid drug trafficking from South America. American troops surrounded Noriega and he surrendered, he was arrested and brought to trial in the United States where he was convicted of a variety of charges ("George Bush" 4). Which include "cocaine trafficking, racketeering, and money laundering, marking the first time in history that a U.S. jury had convicted a foreign head of state of criminal charges" (Noriega 1). George Bushs plan to fight drugs was also somewhat effective. Cocaine use was down 21% over his administration (Check 2) and down 80% overall from 1985 until the ...
    Related: drug abuse, drug enforcement, drug free america, drug policy, drug problem, drug trafficking, drug war
  • Legalization Of Marijuana - 2,593 words
    ... il. Several pressing issues have arose throughout time, such as abortion and capitol punishment. The controversies have been addressed and decisions have been made. A new topic has emerged l states (1986, Congress), (Buchsbaum, 8). This crowds court rooms and jail cells, often times forcing judges to release violent offenders. In 1994 alone, 1.35 million people were incarcerated because of possession and use of marijuana (Buckley, 70). Even though only an estimates ten million Americans use marijuana on a monthly basis, about seventy million have at some time tried it. The current laws would justify putting all seventy million citizens in jail (Buckley, 70). Several pressing issues have ...
    Related: legalization, legalize marijuana, legalizing marijuana, marijuana, marijuana laws
  • Losing The War On Drugs - 1,179 words
    ... nity to travel around Western Europe, and among all of the places I visit, I find Amsterdam to be one the most intriguing. Specifically, living in and watching a city function, in which drug use is considered a health problem rather than a criminal issue, will be different than anything I have ever seen. I have always been curious as to the extent of which the drug policy was abused by the people of the Netherlands, in relation to the strictly enforced drug policies of the United States. However, recent studies show that the use of both soft drugs (marijuana, hashish, and mushrooms) and hard drugs (ecstasy, cocaine, and heroine) are significantly lower in the Netherlands per percentage o ...
    Related: drug policy, drugs, war on drugs, high school, recent studies
  • Marijuana - 1,482 words
    ... stimulate appetite. In asthma patients, several studies have shown that THC acts as a bronchodilator and reserves bronchial constriction (Rosenthal 68). In treating epilepsy, marijuana is used to prevent both grande mal and other epileptic seizures in some patients. Marijuana also limits the muscle pain and spasticity caused by multiple sclerosis and it relieves tremor and unsteady gait. Lastly, marijuana has been clinically shown to be effective in relieving muscle spasm and spasticity (Rosenthal 69). History of Marijuana Laws The hemp plant was once a widely cultivated plant in the New World by settlers. It has been known for centuries that the fiber from the hemp plant is very useful ...
    Related: legalizing marijuana, marijuana, marijuana illegal, marijuana laws, drug war
  • Marijuana And Medicine - 1,815 words
    Marijuana And Medicine I decided upon the question "Should Marijuana be Medicine?" because I wanted to confirm my strong beliefs of an anti-drug policy, but after research, my attitude towards medical marijuana changed because it seems the benefits far out-weigh the risks. Of the 60 some chemicals unique to the marijuana plant, the main psychoactive ingredient and the one for exploring the physiological as well as the psychological role in the anandamide system is delta-9 tetrahydrocannabinol, or more commonly known as THC. The anandamide system is concerned with mood, memory and cognition, perception, movement, coordination, sleep, thermoregulation, appetite, and immune response (a). Cannab ...
    Related: marijuana, medical marijuana, medicine, research institute, national drug
  • Marijuana Prohibition Is A Violation Of First Amendment Rights - 1,640 words
    Marijuana Prohibition is a Violation of First Amendment Rights "Let me ask you something if you had a choice, what would it be: Marijuana or Martinis?" This question appeared in the New York Times on Tuesday, May 12th, 1998. Due to the "Marijuana Tax Act" of 1937 the only legal choice that you and the 18 million other adults who used marijuana last year can make is the martini ("Against Drug Prohibition" ix). The legal acceptance of alcohol, however, does not exclude it from the category of a "drug," even in the eyes of the Food and Drug Administration. The prohibition of marijuana is historically counteractive and a direct defiance of First Amendment rights. This prohibition has denied thou ...
    Related: alcohol prohibition, amendment, drug prohibition, first amendment, marijuana, marijuana prohibition, medical marijuana
  • Medical Marijuana - 1,071 words
    ... ople and would allow states to determine for themselves whether marijuana should be legal for medicinal use. It is a common-sense solution to a complex issue and would provide a great deal of relief from suffering for a large number of people. NORML implores Congress to support this compassionate proposal to protect the ten of thousands of Americans who currently use marijuana as a medicine and the millions who would benefit from its legal access. Many seriously ill patients find marijuana the most effective way to relieve their pain and suffering and federal marijuana prohibition must not, in good conscience, continue to deny them that medication. Bibliography 1. House of Lords Select C ...
    Related: american medical, marijuana, marijuana prohibition, medical association, medical marijuana
  • 33 results found, view research papers on page:
  • 1
  • 2