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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: drug offenders

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  • Drug Offenders Made Harden Criminals - 621 words
    Drug Offenders Made Harden Criminals For John Russell it was just another ordinary night. At 2:00 A.M. he was calmly sleeping. He arose to a cracking noise outside; just then the police came crashing into the house. They ransack his house and found a 3-ounce bag of marijuana. In his underwear only, he is cuffed and taken to jail. In the meantime his wife and two kids huddle in the bedroom scarred to death. Was it all necessary? Is the pursuit of marijuana really so important that a family has to be terrorized and broken apart. Mr. Russell is now serving a five sentence in prison. In an effort to make a few extra dollars for his family, he has now missed out on many things. He had to miss his ...
    Related: criminals, drug offenders, drug problem, harden, the manager
  • Boot Legger Version 20 Legalize Drugs - 1,293 words
    Boot Legger Version 2.0 (Legalize Drugs) I go to Tulane and received an A+ on this paper. You cant tell if a boy or girl wrote it either. Good Luck Bootlegger: Version 2.0 Prohibition will work great injury to the cause of temperance for it goes beyond the bounds of reason in that it attempts to control a mans appetite by legislation and make a crime out of things that are not a crime. A prohibition law strikes a blow at the very principle upon which our government was founded Abraham Lincoln On January 16, 1920 the Eighteenth Amendment was ratified by thirty-six states and became part of the Constitution. The intention of this new amendment was to lower alcohol consumption by Americans. At ...
    Related: boot, drug addicts, drug legalization, drug offenders, drug prohibition, drugs, illegal drugs
  • Cause And Effects - 646 words
    CAUSE AND EFFECTS Crime has become a major problem in the U.S. In fact, crime is the #1 fear of most people today. Crimes occur everywhere and at all times of the day and night. There are many causes of crime in our country. A large part of crime has to do with the economy in our country today. One of the many causes of crime is poverty. When people can't afford things that they want or need, they resort to theft and robbery. Also, these people feel that they have nothing to lose if they are caught. People may also feel bitter towards society if they are going through difficult economic times. There is a big problem with drugs in our nation today. Drugs are another cause of crime. "In 1995, ...
    Related: mental illnesses, drug offenders, major problem, criminal, dopamine
  • Crime And Punishment - 1,517 words
    Crime And Punishment The crime problem in the United States has historically been misstated and exaggerated by bureaucrats and politicians. The intentions behind these overstatements vary within each context but a common thread emerges upon closer examination. As in any capitalist society, money and material possession are the primary motivation that fuels society and people. It could be argued that FBI director Louis Freeh made his comments to the National Press Club in 1994 out of genuine concern for the American people, but realistically the statement was made in an effort to gather support and increase funding for law enforcement. Following this statement and from increased pressure from ...
    Related: crime, crime and punishment, crime control, crime problem, crime rate, crime report, property crime
  • Criminals - 1,335 words
    Criminals Do prisons teach people to become worse criminals? Many people think that a prisoner is taught how to be a better criminal while in prison. Prisoners are integrated with people that have committed worse crimes than the ones that they have committed. The bigger and better criminals teach the others what they need to learn to survive prison life. There are many other aspects of prison that can make a prisoner worse than when he or she went in. Are prisons helping to stop the crime wave? For starters, prisons around the United States are extremely overcrowded. Wyoming is a good example of overcrowding in prisons. We have had to send a number of prisoners to Colorado because we have ru ...
    Related: criminals, prison population, health problems, human rights, bars
  • Drug Legalization - 393 words
    Drug Legalization Essay Questions April 28, 2001 Drug Legalization The debate over drug legalization has existed for decades. It is a hot topic for discussion among young and old alike. While many different opinions have been argued over, most of America can agree on one thing--we have a serious drug problem in the United States. Solutions to this problem have been tossed about; we should create harsher laws for drug users, we should legalize the less dangerous drugs in society, we should legalize all drugs and set standards and regulations regarding their use and distribution. The war on drugs was popularized during the Reagan administration and has been a political mantra for conservative ...
    Related: drug laws, drug legalization, drug offenders, drug problem, legalization
  • Drug Legalization In America - 796 words
    Drug Legalization In America The issues surrounding drug legalization are complicated and sensitive. Each year drug use kills about 14,000 Americans and costs taxpayers approximately $70 billion. Drug-related illnesses and crime costs an estimated $67 billion per year. Drug use also influences worker productivity as seventy-one percent of all illicit drug users are eighteen and older and employed. Also impacted is public safety. A 1993, study from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration indicated that eighteen percent of 2,000 deaths from seven states had drugs, other than alcohol, in their systems when they died. Ironically, some citizens still support the idea of drug legalizati ...
    Related: america, drug enforcement, drug legalization, drug offenders, drug policy, drug treatment, illicit drug
  • Drugs Legalization - 620 words
    Drugs Legalization Although it is clear that society is unhappy with current efforts to stop illegal drug smuggling, illegal drug use and distribution, no one seems to know what should be done. With drug use and drug related crime on the rise, some Americans argue that current drug law is too easy on drug offenders. Society at large asks, "Can we ever stop illegal drugs and their use?" It is a question that unfortunately has no easy answer. More and more people in America feel that if this country cannot stop illegal drugs, drugs should be legalized and controlled. Many people feel that this will eliminate the senseless violence that often goes hand in hand with illegal drugs. Although moral ...
    Related: dangerous drugs, drug abuse, drug control, drug legalization, drug offenders, drug policy, drug problem
  • Drugs, Crime And Prohibition - 1,645 words
    Drugs, Crime And Prohibition Drugs, Crime and Prohibition Do drugs really cause crime, or is it our governments way of controlling the communities? Many people blame drugs for every problem in our society, but is it the true evil in our society? No one person can answer that question. There are only opinions and supposed theories on this issue. We have been taught over the years that drugs were bad and that they only affected the poor and less fortunate, and turned them into crazy criminals, but this isn't true to any extent. The laws controlling and prohibiting drugs are the true culprit. Would our crime levels decline if drugs were legalized to some extent, or would we just increase the de ...
    Related: crime, drugs and crime, prohibition, twenty-first century, human beings
  • Drugs, Crime And Prohibition - 1,624 words
    ... upposed decline in illicit drug use, Anslinger started to push for even stiffer penalties. Instead of approving a new bill, the American Bar Association created a committee that was in charge of investigating the Harrison Act and the first nationwide investigation of illicit drugs. Arising from this investigation was the Narcotic Control Act, which was the most severe antidrug legislation put into affect(3). The NCA doubled the lengthy sentences of the Boggs Act, and added the death penalty in some cases. These laws also failed in extinguishing the drug epidemic. By now, most states specified that marijuana and heroin penalties should be identical, and consequently marijuana penalties we ...
    Related: crime, crime control, prohibition, violent crime, substance abuse
  • Have We Lost The War On Drugs - 1,537 words
    Have we lost the War on Drugs? The War on Drugs officially started in 1972 with President Nixon declaring that drug law enforcement was not strict enough. To enforce the laws of the original Harrison Act, a new and intensified plan was to be enacted. The war reached its peak during the Reagan and Bush administrations, in which $67 billion was spent in enforcement of drug laws. The plan had worked relatively well until near the end of the Bush administration and drug use overall was down. But the Clinton administration has not been as effective and it is time to determine what our next course of action will be regarding drug enforcement. Prisons are becoming increasingly overcrowded and many ...
    Related: dangerous drugs, drug abuse, drug enforcement, drug laws, drug offenders, drug policy, drug problem
  • Incarcerating A Generation - 1,940 words
    Incarcerating A Generation Incarceration of a People The disproportionate numbers of African Americans in the prison system is a very serious issue, which is not usually discussed in its totality. However, it is quite important to address the matter because it ultimately will have an effect on African Americans as a whole. Of the many tribulations that plague Americans today, the increase in the amount of African American men and women in prisons is unbelievable. It would be nave to say that the increase is due to the fact that more African Americans are committing crimes now than before. When in actuality it has very prevalent connections to a systematic plan to incarcerate a race of people ...
    Related: urban development, drug offenders, vice president, correctional, profoundly
  • Internet Censorship - 1,535 words
    Internet Censorship Animal cruelty encompasses a range of different behaviors harmful to animals, from neglect to malicious, brutal killings. Studies show that animal cruelty may lead to more serious forms of crime, like heavy drug use, violent outbursts, and most common, cold blooded murder. Many studies in psychology, sociology, and criminology during the last twenty-five years have demonstrated that violent offenders frequently have childhood and adolescent histories of serious and repeated animal cruelty. A web page that goes by the name Animal Alliance says most cruelty investigated by humane officers, is unintentional neglect, and can be resolved through education. (3) I was slightly s ...
    Related: censorship, internet censorship, young people, main street, harmful
  • Juvenile Drug Courts - 1,158 words
    Juvenile Drug Courts JUVENILE DRUG COURTS Drugs and our youth, the numbers are rising. More and more children today are using drugs without their parents knowing. What happens when they get caught? It all depends on who caught them. If it is the parents, usually a big punishment. If it is law enforcement they may have to appear in front of drug courts specialized to handle juvenile cases. Sometimes the parents may even turn them in, just for the treatment and help these special courts can offer. The juveniles are then referred to juvenile drug courts for help. Today there are 72 juvenile drug courts in operation in 41 states in the United States, with more to come in the future What exactly ...
    Related: adult court, court process, court system, drug offenders, drug treatment, juvenile, juvenile court
  • Juvenile Drug Courts - 1,101 words
    ... ion that includes requiring the child to participate in treatment, submit to frequent drug testing, appear at regular and frequent court status hearings, and comply with other court conditions geared to accountability, rehabilitation, long-term sobriety, and cessation of criminal activity. Enhancements introduced by the juvenile drug court to the traditional court process for handling these types of cases include: Immediate intervention by the court and continuous supervision of the progress of the juvenile and his/her family by the judge; development of a program of treatment and rehabilitation services that addresses the family's needs, not simply the child's; judicial oversight and co ...
    Related: court process, drug offenders, drug testing, juvenile, juvenile court, juvenile offenders
  • Legalization Of Marijuana - 2,593 words
    ... il. Several pressing issues have arose throughout time, such as abortion and capitol punishment. The controversies have been addressed and decisions have been made. A new topic has emerged l states (1986, Congress), (Buchsbaum, 8). This crowds court rooms and jail cells, often times forcing judges to release violent offenders. In 1994 alone, 1.35 million people were incarcerated because of possession and use of marijuana (Buckley, 70). Even though only an estimates ten million Americans use marijuana on a monthly basis, about seventy million have at some time tried it. The current laws would justify putting all seventy million citizens in jail (Buckley, 70). Several pressing issues have ...
    Related: legalization, legalize marijuana, legalizing marijuana, marijuana, marijuana laws
  • Legalization Of Marijuana - 1,016 words
    ... The purchasers would be happy with the price causing a large increase in demand and the government could in turn create more supply, all causing a massive increase in the governments cash intake. This would cause taxes to go down and more programs to arise focusing in on the real problems our country has. The amount of money that government regulation of marijuana could bring in is in the billions. An area where the public would benefit the most from marijuana legalization is in police costs. There are billions of dollars going into drug task forces that deal mainly with marijuana. Since 1965 some 60 million marijuana users have been charged with crimes (Evans). The money used on court f ...
    Related: legalization, legalizing marijuana, marijuana, marijuana laws, marijuana legalization
  • Legalization Of Narcotics - 1,357 words
    Legalization of Narcotics Narcotics, or drugs, are substances that affect the bodys functions. They can stimulate the mind, make people depressed, or make them hyper. Marijuana, heroin, LSD, PCP, cocaine, and anabolic steroids are all considered narcotics. Narcotics are illegal in the U.S. Even though drugs are illegal, about 12 million people use them anyway. Many strict laws have been passed against drugs but they seem to have little affect. People still decide to sell or use drugs for recreational purpose. This is why narcotics should be legalized. Before 1914, it was legal to make, sell, or use any type of drugs. Many of the drugs were used for medicinal use. This was before people found ...
    Related: legalization, first offense, pure food, prescription drugs, depressed
  • Legalize Pot - 985 words
    Legalize Pot There is no denying that the drug problem in our country today has reached epidemic proportions. The problem has gotten so out of hand that many options are being considered to control and/or solve it. Ending the drug war may not seem to be the best answer at first, but the so-called war on drugs has actually accomplished very little. Different options need to be considered. Legalization is an option that hasn't gotten much of a chance, but should be given one. It is my position that marijuana should be legalized. Although many people feel that the legalization of marijuana would result in an increase in the amount of crime and drug abuse, I contend that the opposite is true. Wh ...
    Related: legalize, crime rate, acquired immune deficiency, criminal prosecution, participation
  • Marijuana - 1,482 words
    ... stimulate appetite. In asthma patients, several studies have shown that THC acts as a bronchodilator and reserves bronchial constriction (Rosenthal 68). In treating epilepsy, marijuana is used to prevent both grande mal and other epileptic seizures in some patients. Marijuana also limits the muscle pain and spasticity caused by multiple sclerosis and it relieves tremor and unsteady gait. Lastly, marijuana has been clinically shown to be effective in relieving muscle spasm and spasticity (Rosenthal 69). History of Marijuana Laws The hemp plant was once a widely cultivated plant in the New World by settlers. It has been known for centuries that the fiber from the hemp plant is very useful ...
    Related: legalizing marijuana, marijuana, marijuana illegal, marijuana laws, drug war
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