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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: drinking water

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  • A Civil Action - 1,036 words
    A Civil Action A Civil Action The movie A Civil Action brings up an interesting idea that many people in the public don't see or hear about very often. The idea that the big corporations often don't take into account the safety of the people that work for them or the people that live around the factories. These big corporations are run entirely by money and the idea of what things will cost and how much money they can possibly make. Too many times money is more important than the lives of human beings and the people that run these places only see in dollars and cents. The moral issues that this dilemma brings up are immense. This has been happening for centuries since the industrial revoluti ...
    Related: civil action, maximum profit, drinking water, products company, american
  • A Civil Acton - 1,034 words
    A Civil Acton A Civil Action The movie A Civil Action brings up an interesting idea that many people in the public don't see or hear about very often. The idea that the big corporations often don't take into account the safety of the people that work for them or the people that live around the factories. These big corporations are run entirely by money and the idea of what things will cost and how much money they can possibly make. Too many times money is more important than the lives of human beings and the people that run these places only see in dollars and cents. The moral issues that this dilemma brings up are immense. This has been happening for centuries since the industrial revolutio ...
    Related: civil action, corporate world, maximum profit, human beings, wouldn
  • Acid - 1,218 words
    Acid Rain Acid rain is a serious problem with disastrous effects. Each day this serious problem increases. Many people believe that this issue is too small to deal with right now, and others believe it should be met head on. In the following paragraphs I will be discussing the impact of acid rain effects on wildlife and how our atmosphere is being destroyed. Causes Acid rain is a cancer, eating into the face of Eastern Canada and the North Eastern United States. In Canada, the main sulphuric acid sources are non-ferrous smelters and power generation. On both sides of the border, automobiles are the main sources for nitric acid (about 40% of the total). Power generating plants, industrial com ...
    Related: acid, acid rain, great lakes, disease prevention, bear
  • Acid Rain - 1,289 words
    Acid Rain Pollution comes in various forms. Whether its toxic waste, CFCs, or sewage, they are all hazardous, to the earth. These can deplete the earth and its inhabitants of resources, causing a harmful change. A product of pollution is acid rain. We shall see that acidification is harmful to all forms of life. Acid rain is any form of precipitation that is polluted by sulphur dioxide (SO2), and nitrogen oxides (NOX). This acid precipitation can be in the form of rain, snow, sleet, fog, or cloud vapors. The acidity of substances dissolved in water are measured by their pH levels. Normal precipitation pH levels fall between 5.0-5.6.2 When levels fall below these numbers, then the precipitati ...
    Related: acid, acid rain, rain, human activity, food supply
  • Acid Rain - 1,829 words
    ... . These particles collect on the leaves of the tree, and studies have shown that when these particles contain acid they can cause damage to the leaves. The leaves are the part of the tree that help make food, hence any damage to the leaves will result in harm to the health of the entire tree. Coniferous trees are vulnerable to the harmful effects of acid rain as well. The tree's needles are designed to nourish the tree after they fall to the ground. Each needle houses whole colonies of microscopic bacteria and algae that help the tree change nitrogen into food at the roots. Acid rain will often burn away this material, thereby reducing adequate food supply, and weakening the tree's healt ...
    Related: acid, acid rain, rain, eastern canada, human health
  • Acid Rain Legislation - 824 words
    Acid Rain Legislation Acid Rain Legislation Acid rain is a destructive force as a result of nature and man colliding. It is formed through harmful industrial emissions combining with contents of the earth's atmosphere; a dangerous combination. This prompted governments throughout North America to take action. Many laws and regulations have been implemented, yet the question still remains, Should tougher legislation be implemented to force industries to reduce acid rain emissions? To decide whether tougher legislation should be implemented, one must first understand the details of what exactly acid rain is. Acid rain is a result of mankind's carelessness. It travels a long one of the most eff ...
    Related: acid, acid rain, legislation, rain, power plants
  • Acid Rains - 540 words
    Acid Rains Acid rain refers to all types of precipitation--rain, snow, sleet, hail, fog--that is acidic in nature. Acidic means that these forms of water have a pH lower than the 5.6 average of rainwater. Acid rain kills aquatic life, trees, crops and other vegetation, damages buildings and monuments, corrodes copper and lead piping, damages such man-made things as automobiles, reduces soil fertility and can cause toxic metals to leach into underground drinking water sources. Rain is naturally acidic because carbon dioxide, found normally in the earth's atmosphere, reacts with water to form carbonic acid. While "pure" rain's acidity is pH 5.6-5.7, actual pH readings vary from place to place ...
    Related: acid, acid rain, carbon dioxide, bodies of water, dioxide
  • Air Pollution - 1,567 words
    Air Pollution Acid rain is a problem that has plagued earth for years. It is poisoning our waters, animals, plants, soil, and more. It is a problem that can not be ignored or it might have catastrophic results on our environment. Acid rain is caused by air pollution, which is due to man-made actions. Scientists have discovered that air pollution from the burning of fossil fuels is the major cause of acid rain. Power plants and factories burn coal and oil, which is used to produce the electricity we need to heat and light our homes and to run our electric appliances. We also burn natural gas, coal, and oil to heat our homes, and our cars, trucks, boats, and airplanes use gasoline to run, whic ...
    Related: air pollution, pollution, pollution prevention, power plants, fossil fuel
  • Alternatives To The Clean Water Dilemma - 821 words
    Alternatives To The Clean Water Dilemma Alternatives to the Clean Water Dilemma Because of our increasing populations around the world, more and more of our clean drinking water is being used and contaminated. The world needs to take action immediately. Implementing one plan will not save our drinking water, but instead several different things need to come in to effect to preserve the world's clean drinking water. One alternative we have is to make people implement a wastewater garden in their homes and businesses. A wastewater garden is a garden made up of specially chosen plants and soils that can dispose of our harmful wastes in a totally non-harmful way. The way it works is all of the g ...
    Related: clean water, dilemma, drinking water, carbon dioxide, state government
  • Alzheimers Disease - 1,004 words
    Alzheimer's Disease Dementia is the loss of intellectual and social abilities severe enough to interfere with daily functioning. For centuries, people called it senility and considered it an inevitable part of aging. It is now known that dementia is not a normal part of the aging process and that it is caused by an underlying condition. People with this condition need special assistance to carry on with their normal lives. This paper will explain some of the social services that are helping to combat this disease and an analysis of the services effectiveness. More than four million older Americans have Alzheimer's, the most common form of dementia. And that number is expected to triple in th ...
    Related: alois alzheimer, alzheimer's disease, alzheimers disease, cardiovascular disease, disease process
  • Aristotles Political Ideal - 1,169 words
    Aristotle's Political Ideal Aristotle's Political Ideal "It is not Fortune's power to make a city good; that is a matter of scientific planning and deliberative policy." Aristotle, along with most of the prominent thinkers of his time, theorized upon what the Ideal Political State would be and through what means it could be obtained. Aristotle wrote on this discussion of the Ideal State in books VII and VIII of The Politics. What Aristotle observed around him were the prevalent city-states of ancient Greece. It is commonly believed that he did not have a vision of the large nation-state and especially not such great federations as the United States and Russia. What Aristotle referred to when ...
    Related: ideal state, ancient greece, city states, natural resources, render
  • Arsenic - 1,749 words
    Arsenic Element 33: Arsenic Abstract Arsenic is element 33 on the periodic table and is in Group 15. Arsenic is obviously an extremely poisonous element; however, some people have found arsenic to have a restorative effect on them. Chemically, arsenic is a metalloid. Two common forms of arsenic are gray and yellow. (see Figure 1-A) Element 33 has an atomic weight of 74.9216 and the chemical symbol of As. It boils at 613C, melts at 817C, and has a density of 5.72. (see Figure 2-A) The element has been known for centuries and can be easily obtained from ores such as arsenopyrite (FeAsS), realgar (As2S2), orpiment (As2S3), and arsenic trioxide (As2O3). There are many uses for arsenic. Among the ...
    Related: arsenic, periodic table, skin diseases, chinese medicine, mystery
  • Arsenic - 1,849 words
    ... arsenic and toxicology are interested in the pending crisis in India because of the wealth of information to be gained. It would be possible to discover what diseases arsenic causes and the information learned could help countries such as Taiwan, Chile, and Mongolia, where there are large problems with arsenic contamination. (Bagla and Kaiser 1996) Response from the Indian government to the crisis is low. They had approved a project that costs $25 million in 1995 that would supply piped water to the Malda district, but there has been scant improvement. In fact, the problem has grown more widespread. Tube wells that were not previously contaminated are now tainted and the federal governme ...
    Related: arsenic, protection agency, problems caused, indian government, stomach
  • Aztec Indians - 1,096 words
    Aztec Indians The Aztec Indians, who are known for their domination of southern and central Mexico, ruled between the 14th and 16th centuries. They built a great empire and developed very modernized ways of doing things. They had phenomenal architectural skills and waterway systems. The Aztec Indians also had very developed social class and government systems and practiced a form of religion. To begin with, the Aztecs were very skilled in the art of Architecture and waterway systems. "An example of the monumental architecture within the Aztec society is the great pyramid of Tenochtitlan. Montezuma I, who was the ruler of the Aztecs in 1466, created it. The pyramid was not finished until the ...
    Related: aztec, aztec empire, aztec religion, external affairs, social structure
  • Aztecs - 1,637 words
    Aztecs The Aztec Empire was a Native American state that ruled much of what is now Mexico from about 1427 until 1521, when the empire was conquered by the Spaniards. The empire represented the highest point in the development of the rich Aztec civilization that had begun more than a century earlier. At the height of their power, the Aztec controlled a region stretching from the Valley of Mexico in central Mexico east to the Gulf of Mexico and south to Guatemala. The Aztec built great cities and developed a complex social, political, and religious structure. Their capital, Tenochitlan, was located on the site of present-day Mexico City. An elaborate city built on islands and marsh land, Tenoc ...
    Related: aztec civilization, aztec empire, aztec gods, aztecs, city states
  • Beloved By Toni Morrison - 1,439 words
    Beloved By Toni Morrison In her novel Beloved, Toni Morrison writes about the life of former slaves of Sweet Home. Sethe, one of the main characters, was once a slave to a man and his wife, Mr. and Mrs. Garner. After Garners sudden death, schoolteacher comes to Sweet Home and takes control of the slaves. His treatment of all the slaves forced them to run away. Fearing that her children would be sold, Sethe sent her two boys and her baby girl ahead to her mother-in-law. On the way to freedom, a white girl named Amy Denver helped Sethe deliver her daughter, who she later names Denver. About a month after Sethe escapes slavery, schoolteacher found her and tried to bring her back. In fear that h ...
    Related: beloved, morrison, toni, toni morrison, drinking water
  • Biological Viruses: All Time Enemies - 1,132 words
    ... a rash of fluid-filled blisters that begin as red spots covering most of the body and the inside of the mouth. The disease is dangerous to newborns, to people first infected in adulthood, and to those in whom the virus remains dormant in nerve cells, erupting as the more painful and sometimes chronic zoster (shingles) later in life. VZV is a member of the Herpes virus family, which also includes the causative agents of infectious mononucleosis, roseola, and oral and genital herpes (Microsoft Encarta 96 Encyclopedia). An extremely contagious viral disease, chiefly of children, characterized by early fever, an eruption of papules and vesicles, and mild constitutional disturbances. In most ...
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  • Brisbane River - 1,955 words
    Brisbane River 1.0 INTRODUCTION The Brisbane River has flowed for over 400 million years. The catchment of the Brisbane River has overcome phases of flood and drought while its origins altered as the surrounding land changed overtime. In 1823, John Oxley entered the river for the first time. At the time the river appeared clean and unpolluted. Oxley immediately recognised the river's potential as a site for new settlement, through his recommendation the city of Brisbane was established in 1825. The Brisbane River extends inland for 300km reaching its source at the foothills of the Great Dividing Range. The river's catchment occupies an area of approximately 30,000km2 and releases it waters i ...
    Related: brisbane, river basin, central business, water quality, improving
  • Chernobyl - 1,926 words
    ... medical observation of the population has not revealed any increase in other cancers, as well as in leukemia, congenital abnormalities, adverse pregnancy outcomes or any other radiation caused disease that could be attributed to the Chernobyl accident. Large scientific and epidemiological research programs, some of them sponsored by international organizations such as the WHO and the EC, are being conducted to provide further insight into possible future health effects. However, the population dose estimates generally tend to indicate that, with the exception of thyroid disease, it is unlikely that the exposure would lead to discernible radiation effects. In the case of the liquidators ...
    Related: chernobyl, significant impact, international organizations, international community, observation
  • Cholera The Forgotten Disease - 475 words
    Cholera The Forgotten Disease Cholera the Forgotten Disease It seems every time we hear of a major flood or earthquake in a developing country, we hear once again about cholera. Cholera has been very rare in industrial nations, such as the USA, for the last 100 years, however, what we do not realize is that cholera is endemic in many small countries which have limited drinking water and sewage treatment facilities. Caused by an infection of bacterium Vibrio Cholerae in the intestine, a cholera infection is often mild or without symptoms, but sometimes is severe. Symptoms appear 2 to 3 days after initial exposure. Approximately one in 20 infected persons display symptoms of water diarrhea, vo ...
    Related: cholera, forgotten, developing country, drinking water, immunity
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