Research paper topics, free example research papers

Free research papers and essays on topics related to: drawbacks

  • 129 results found, view research papers on page:
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • >>>
  • A Need For Welfare - 349 words
    A Need For Welfare A Need for Welfare Theres an old joke that asked, Where do you find a welfare recipients check? Under his work boots of course (Armitage 45). For a long time now, since the accomplished formation of a stable government, the U.S government has had the programs and passed laws that either dealt with issues of or influenced family. Many of these family programs and laws currently in place today are frequently and commonly debated. One of the most debated and most labored over family programs or laws is welfare. The argument is, whether or not to, how welfare should be cut or minimized. The debate is simple enough, but the argument on welfares benefits and drawbacks is not. On ...
    Related: welfare, u.s. government, social services, social work, paying
  • Accounting Ethics - 1,833 words
    Accounting Ethics When examining the effect of open marketing on the profession of accounting it is important to view it from three perspectives: the client's, the profession's, and society's. Additionally, two key areas that are affected by marketing must be addressed, these are concerning competition, and ethical implications. Marketing in public accounting is here to stay therefore making an argument against its existence would be fruitless; however, in order to achieve maximum benefit to the firm, the client, and society more stringent guidelines must be implemented at the firm level. The first, and most obvious, of the effected areas is competition. Within competition several points are ...
    Related: accounting, ethics, public accounting, small firms, keep prices
  • Acid Precipitation - 663 words
    Acid Precipitation Acid Precipitation Our atmosphere functions as living ecosystem of chemical reactions. Through the help of the water cycle, chemicals pass through the atmosphere and are eventually taken up by the soil, surface water, or organic materials. Human beings have added enormously to the atmospheric burden of many toxic substances. The most prominent evidence of this is the presence of acid rain: precipitation and particles that have been made acidic by air pollution. Acid rain is a direct consequence of the atmosphere's self-cleansing process. The tiny droplets of water that make up clouds continuously capture suspended particles and soluble trace gases. Not all trace gases can ...
    Related: acid, acid rain, precipitation, air pollution, power plants
  • Air Pollution - 1,567 words
    Air Pollution Acid rain is a problem that has plagued earth for years. It is poisoning our waters, animals, plants, soil, and more. It is a problem that can not be ignored or it might have catastrophic results on our environment. Acid rain is caused by air pollution, which is due to man-made actions. Scientists have discovered that air pollution from the burning of fossil fuels is the major cause of acid rain. Power plants and factories burn coal and oil, which is used to produce the electricity we need to heat and light our homes and to run our electric appliances. We also burn natural gas, coal, and oil to heat our homes, and our cars, trucks, boats, and airplanes use gasoline to run, whic ...
    Related: air pollution, pollution, pollution prevention, power plants, fossil fuel
  • Air Traffic Strike - 4,375 words
    Air Traffic Strike The Pressures of PATCO: Strikes and Stress in the 1980s By Rebecca Pels -------------------------------------------------- ---------------------- Note on electronic format: you can access any citation by clicking on the note number. In order to leave citations and return to the main text of the document, press the Back key on your viewer. -------------------------------------------------- ---------------------- On August 3, 1981 almost 13,000 air traffic controllers went on strike after months of negotiations with the federal government. During the contract talks, Robert Poli, president of the Professional Air Traffic Controllers Association (PATCO), explained the union's th ...
    Related: strike, traffic, traffic control, traffic controllers, aviation safety
  • Airport Privatization - 1,436 words
    ... ant to have to worry about cleaning up anything that might be unearthed later. Problems with reuse As construction began, planners soon discovered that although the city was saving time and money by reusing Bergstrom, there were drawbacks. One example came the day after the Air Force vacated the base. All across Bergstrom, residents and employees had turned off the water when they left. The resulting water pressure was more than the old system of pipes could handle. The city field staff ran around for months chasing water leaks. The city soon discovered that much of the base's utility system could not be reused, resulting in one of the first increases in the airport budget. Utilities the ...
    Related: airport, international airport, privatization, international affairs, surrounding area
  • Alternative Medicine - 1,097 words
    ... d physiological processes are closely linked. The connection between stress and immune system response, for example, is well documented (Epiro and Walsh). Some scientists suggest that the power of prayer and faith healing, like some forms of meditation, might also be physiological in that they may protect the body from the negative effects of stress hormone norepinephrine. In addition, experience shows that relaxation techniques can help patients enormously. 'Medicine is a three-legged stool,' says Dr. Herbert Benson of Harvard Medical School (Epiro and Walsh). 'One leg is pharmaceuticals, the other is surgery, and the third is what people can do for themselves. Mind-body work is an esse ...
    Related: alternative medicine, herbal medicine, medicine, modern medicine, sports medicine
  • Alzheimer's: Is There A Cure - 1,058 words
    ... y, 2001). Johnson & Johnson say that the drug will be available starting in May. Another approach to finding a cure for Alzheimer's Disease is finding something that will block molecules that are possibly responsible for the disease. Bob Vassar designed and implemented an ingenious method for isolating the gene for an enzyme called beta-secretase, which is found to be a key culprit in the disease (Garber, 2001). While other drugs that are approved only improve the functions of those with the disease, this method could actually stop the progression, not just slow it down. There are some drawbacks to this method. What is not known about the enzyme beta-secretase, though seemingly linked to ...
    Related: cure, spend time, social change, federal drug administration, psychosis
  • Armor Of Ancient Rome - 1,908 words
    ... and relieving the shoulders of part of their burden. Moreover, tests using contemporary arrow types by Massey suggests that most arrowhead types consistently penetrated the mail to a depth that would prove lethal to the wearer. However, bunching of the mail at suspension points prevented penetration of the mail beyond a depth of 3-5 cm. This [implies] that the doubling of mail shoulder defenses known to be practiced by both Romans and Celts may have saved the life of their owners." These observations are consistent with Plutarch's writings of the life of Marcus Licinius Crassus who in 53 B.C. engaged the Parthians with his army in the deserts of Mesopotamia at the Battle of Carrhae. Plut ...
    Related: ancient rome, armor, imperial rome, rome, roman army
  • Atlantic Slave Trade - 615 words
    Atlantic Slave Trade Atlantic Slave Trade When most people talk about or think about slavery, they look at how it effected the US. The Atlantic Slave Trade had a huge effect on the US but there are no words or expressions that can describe the effects it had on Africa and its familys. It is estimated that between 1450 and 1900, there were 11,698,000 slaves exported from Africa. (Atlantic Slave trade, pg.170) To understand the effects this had on Africa you must consider the families that lost relatives, the stores that lost business, and even the friends that lost friendships. None of the misfortunes can be brought back or replaced. The many lives that were taken can never be brought back to ...
    Related: atlantic, atlantic slave trade, slave, slave trade, point of view
  • Bioterrorism - 1,831 words
    Bioterrorism You wake up early for work and kiss your family goodbye. On your daily transit you see a man drop a glass vial in the subway, but you think nothing of it. Moments later you become a statistic. A statistic of Bioterrorism. The threat of Bioterrorism, long ignored and denied, has heightened over the past years and needs to be publicly addressed. There are three possible solutions to this threat that are within grasp. The first of which would be a nation wide vaccination against all agents that could be used against the American public. Second, we could educate people to more efficiently spot the symptoms of such an act, or to protect themselves from an act that has already taken p ...
    Related: american public, human life, present danger, countless, outbreak
  • Black Holes As Future Power Plants - 1,996 words
    Black Holes As Future Power Plants Black Holes: The Power Source for Future Space Travel? Ryan Weaver University of Alaska Anchorage Everyone knows that the spaceships in Star Trek that travel faster than the speed of light are mere science fiction. According to Einstein's theory of relativity, if an object reached the speed of light, its mass would be immediately transformed into energy. Currently our spaceships can not even reach mars in less than five years. Now, with modern theories of black holes, trips to other solar systems may be possible at nearly the speed of light. Black holes were only proven to exist within the last twenty-five years and were only really considered to exist for ...
    Related: black hole, black holes, nuclear power, power plants, power supply
  • Brave New World Eugenics - 903 words
    Brave New World - Eugenics In chapter II of a Brave New World Revisited by Aldous Huxley, Huxley makes some very bold statements on the current state of our nations increasing technology towards medicine. This leads to the formation of the idea that we need to institute a eugenics program. Though there are many drawbacks in using eugenics, the ultimate goal is very beneficial. Huxley gives a very clear example on why we need a system like eugenics when he states an example which involves introducing a cure for malaria to a tropical island. Suppose someone was to go to a tropical island with DDT and wipe out malaria. After two or three years, hundreds of thousands of lives are saved. Though t ...
    Related: brave, brave new world, eugenics, world war ii, ultimate goal
  • Can Sociology Be Value Free - 1,275 words
    ... er a disinterested academic one...the tradition thus has a double intent; on the one hand it engages in the primary sociological task of describing and documenting the 'state of society', on the other hand it addresses itself to central social and political issues (Halsey et al 1980 in McNeill 1990 p12) The conclusion that can be drawn from this is that there never has been a value free sociology, just an attempt to merge a value choice with objective research methods (McNeil 1990 p13) During the twentieth century the positivist approach that fostered the hypothetico-deductive mode, although rational in manner came to be seen as coldly logical. In favour, especially since the 1960s, has ...
    Related: free press, sociology, total value, research study, society and culture
  • Cannabis Hemp Marijuana - 2,262 words
    Cannabis Hemp. . .Marijuana! Article copied work for work from April 1990 Issue of High Times Magazine pages 37-41 and page 57. "OUR CHALLENGE TO THE WORLD: TRY TO PROVE US WRONG-- If all fossil fuels and their derivatives (coal, oil, natural gas, synthetic fibers and petrochemicals) as well as the deforestation of trees for paper and agriculture (e.g., Brazilian & Indonesian rainforests), are banned from use in order to save the planet, preserve the ozone layer and reverse the greenhouse effect with its global warming trend: Then there is only one known renewable natural resource able to provide all(underlined) of the following goods and essentials such as paper and textiles; meet all of th ...
    Related: cannabis, hemp, marijuana, stock exchange, true meaning
  • Chernobyl - 1,908 words
    Chernobyl Chernobyl Biology 10 Project For Mrs. S. Kolovetsios By Dmitry Neofitides 1/05/99 Contents Introduction The accident Release of radioactive materials Reaction of national authorities Radiation dose estimates Health impact Agricultural and environmental impacts Potential residual risks Conclusion Introduction On 26 April 1986, the Chernobyl nuclear power station, in Ukraine, suffered a major accident that was followed by a contamination of the surrounding area by the large quantities of radioactive substances. The specific features of the contamination favored a widespread distribution of radioactivity throughout the Northern Hemisphere, mainly across Europe. A contributing factor w ...
    Related: chernobyl, psychological effects, health effects, emergency management, anymore
  • Cloning - 918 words
    Cloning Cloning In the past few years, the topic of cloning has been in the news a lot. It is a very controversial issue, with many opposing viewpoints. While some find it acceptable, others object for religious reasons. A big concern is the possibility of abuse of this new technology. One of the big questions is Where will we stop? We may start by just experimenting and studying, but then what? Manufacturing human bodies for spare parts? No one can be sure where it will stop. The Supreme court says that everyone has the right to make their own reproductive decisions without government interference, but now it is proposing bans on human cloning. These bans prevent the very research needed to ...
    Related: cloning, cloning human cloning, human cloning, organ transplant, heart attack
  • Cloning Issues - 1,738 words
    Cloning Issues I have observed in my nineteen years of living that almost everyone in this society strives to be the same or like the popular culture. The average person is very materialistic, and strives for an appealing physical appearance. Artificiality is common in the popular culture. For example, dying of hair color, inserting color contacts, getting lyposuction, implants or removal of flaws on the body is prevalent. I strongly oppose human cloning primarily because I believe that humans already try to replicate themselves enough and having the same genes is not necessary. Plus, just because there may be two identical beings doesnt mean that they will behave the same. In this essay wil ...
    Related: cloning, human cloning, endangered species, natural process, morality
  • Cloning Technology - 1,787 words
    Cloning Technology Technology is changing the world as we know it. Not all of these advances in technology are viewed as positive. One of the breakthroughs that has received mixed responses is the issue of cloning. There has been much debate on this topic, and the debate is certain to rage on for many years to come. You may be asking yourself: What is cloning? How can I benefit from cloning? Is cloning legal? Why should we clone human beings? What is the world community doing to control cloning? I hope to answer these and other questions throughout the course of this paper. What is cloning? According to the Human Cloning Foundation (HCF1998), cloning is a scientific process in which a strand ...
    Related: cloning, human cloning, technology, heart attack, tay sachs disease
  • Communism In The American Education System - 1,428 words
    ... o schools for having children collect items like soup labels or sales receipts from certain stores have increased by 83%, and corporate-sponsored materials that claim to have some kind of instructional content have increased 963%. After factoring in a few other types of media propaganda, the overall propaganda increase between 1990 and 1999 was 303% (Molnar). The USSR also pioneered some interesting programs. One such program was a School to Work Act. In the 1958-1959 school year, the Soviet Union passed new reform laws that required all pupils in the three senior grades of the secondary schools to work in Soviet factories or farms for one-third of their school time (Noah). In other word ...
    Related: american, american education, american school, brown v board of education, communism, department of education, education policy
  • 129 results found, view research papers on page:
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • >>>