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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: down syndrome

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  • Downs Syndrome, Turners Syndrome, And Redgreen Color Blindness - 682 words
    1.) Three genetic disorders are Down's syndrome, Turner's syndrome, and Red-green color blindness. They are all caused by undesirable genes inherited by normal genetic mechanisms. These mutations are usually recessive because dominant ones usually die. Turner's Syndrome is caused by faulty cell division known as non disjunction. This occurs when chromosomes fail to separate. IN this disorder, the affected have one "x" chromosome. The effect are an underdeveloped female, mental retardedness, and sterility. Down syndrome is a condition caused by an oddosome that occurs on the pair #21. It results in severe abnormality physical and mental defects. For example, shorter bubble-shape eyes, short f ...
    Related: blindness, down syndrome, downs, cell division, external environment
  • Alcohol - 1,242 words
    Alcohol Sean Fleming Period 1 Mr. Schwartz Final Exam Alcohol The topic alcohol brings many things to mind. In my immediate family the only people that drink any type of alcohol are my mother and father. When my dad comes home from work he usually has a beer for a little relaxation and my mom has a glass of wine for dinner. I feel that they are moderate drinkers and I also feel that it sets a good example for my brother and I. If we hadn't gone over this topic in class I would never have known what type of drinkers they were. Now that I think of it I have one relative who has not always lived the good life. If I was writing this paper 8 years ago my aunt Ann would be drinking very heavily ri ...
    Related: alcohol, best friend, down syndrome, alcoholic beverage, wouldn
  • Autism - 1,018 words
    Autism Autism Throughout the years the diagnosis of autism has changed dramatically. Once, it was mistakenly diagnosed as childhood schizophrenia. Now that much more extensive research has been done, researchers have found distinct characteristics that are typical of autistic individuals. It is most often characterized by difficulty in the child's ability to respond to people, events, and objects. Responses to sensations of light, sound, and feeling may be exaggerated. Delayed speech and language may be associated. Other characteristics include: impairment in ability to make peer friendships, absence of imaginative activity, stereotyped body movements, persistent preoccupation with parts of ...
    Related: autism, cognitive functioning, genetic basis, multiple sclerosis, diagnosed
  • Bioethics - 2,379 words
    ... bes, where it travels to the uterus (Leone, Reproductive 13). Another method, "gamete intrafallopian transfer" (GIFT), is done by injecting sperm and an unfertilized egg into a fallopian tube, at which time conception and implantation will occur (Leone, Reproductive 13). Lastly is the "zona cracking" method. This technique involves piercing the outer layer of the egg and placing a single sperm cell within the egg, then embedding the fertilized egg into the woman (Leone, Reproductive 13). There is yet another well-known fashion for infertile couples to conceive a child - surrogate motherhood. In this process, the fertilized egg of one woman is allowed to develop in the womb of another. Su ...
    Related: national bioethics advisory, handicapped children, bill clinton, human life, agony
  • Bioethics - 2,379 words
    ... bes, where it travels to the uterus (Leone, Reproductive 13). Another method, "gamete intrafallopian transfer" (GIFT), is done by injecting sperm and an unfertilized egg into a fallopian tube, at which time conception and implantation will occur (Leone, Reproductive 13). Lastly is the "zona cracking" method. This technique involves piercing the outer layer of the egg and placing a single sperm cell within the egg, then embedding the fertilized egg into the woman (Leone, Reproductive 13). There is yet another well-known fashion for infertile couples to conceive a child - surrogate motherhood. In this process, the fertilized egg of one woman is allowed to develop in the womb of another. Su ...
    Related: national bioethics advisory, human race, down syndrome, kurt vonnegut, barrier
  • Cloning - 1,808 words
    Cloning Should we clone humans? Cloning humans has become a possibility that seems easier in today's society than it was twenty years ago. It is a method that involves the production of a group of identical cells or organisms that all derive from a single individual (Grolier 220). It is not known when or how cloning humans really became a possibility, but it is known that there are two possible ways that we can clone humans. The first way involves splitting an embryo into several halves and creating many new individuals from that embryo. The second method of cloning a human involves taking cells from an already existing human being and cloning them, in turn creating other individuals that ar ...
    Related: cloning, human cloning, sickle cell, human development, freezer
  • Cloning In Brave New World - 1,623 words
    Cloning In Brave New World Cloning in Brave New World by Christopher M. Earhart It has been said that Muhammad is the Seal of the Prophets, meaning that he was the last. However, our world has recently been graced by another prophet in Aldous Huxley. Huxley's prophetic vision is unmistakable in his science-fiction novel, Brave New World, in which he delivers a valuable message: control advancements in technology before they control us. Huxley supports this message with a strong example of a society that is so overrun by technology that the human race has lost their individuality, freedom, and ultimately their identity as human beings. In this Brave New World, artificially-born humans are gen ...
    Related: brave, brave new world, cloning, aldous huxley, future role
  • Dementiaa - 4,130 words
    Dementiaa IntrodWhat is Dementia ?uction Dementia is an organic brain syndrome which results in global cognitive impairments. Dementia can occur as a result of a variety of neurological diseases. Some of the more well known dementing diseases include Alzheimers disease (AD), multi-infarct dementia (MID), and Huntingtons disease (HD). Throughout this essay the emphasis will be placed on AD (also known as dementia of the Alzheimers type, and primary degenerative dementia), because statistically it is the most significant dementing disease occurring in over 50% of demented patients (see epidemiology). The clinical picture in dementia is very similar to delirium, except for the course. Delirium ...
    Related: thyroid disease, higher level, alzheimers disease, staining, remaining
  • Downs Syndrome, It Is One Of The Most Frequently Occurring Chromosomal Abnormalities Found In Humans Effecting People Of All - 1,868 words
    Down's Syndrome, it is one of the most frequently occurring chromosomal abnormalities found in humans effecting people of all ages, races and economic levels. It is a chromosomal anomaly in cell development that results in a person being born with forty-seven chromosomes instead of the normal forty-six chromosomes. People with Down syndrome may have mild to severe learning disabilities and physical symptoms, which include a small skull, extra folds of skin under the eyes, and a protruding tongue. Roughly one out of every one thousand children born making it the most common genetic disorder. Down syndrome affects over 350,000 people, in the United States alone. Down syndrome has plagued the h ...
    Related: chromosomal, down syndrome, downs, human body, human race, occurring
  • Each Year, Three Thousand To Five Thousand People Are Diagnosed With Down - 906 words
    "Each year, three thousand to five thousand people are diagnosed with Down Syndrome in the United States. It is found in approximately one out of one thousand all live births." (Nadel,37). Down Syndrome occurs when there is an abnormality in chromosome 21. Most people with Down Syndrome (approximately ninety-five percent) has an extra 21 chromosome. Instead of the normal number of forty-six chromosomes in each cell, the individual with Down Syndrome has forty-seven chromosomes. "This condition is called trisomy 21."(Pueschel,6) .Down Syndrome is a combination of birth defects including some degree of physical abnormalities, musculoskeletal disorders, and hypothyroidism. Granted, individuals ...
    Related: diagnosed, down syndrome, blood cells, problems associated, tissue
  • Fragile X Syndrome - 623 words
    FRAGILE X SYNDROME Fragile X Syndrome is an inherited genetic condition associated with mental retardation. It is caused by a mutation of the "X" chromosome. Fathers cannot pass the disease onto their sons, because females always give an "x" chromosome where a man gives either an "x" or a "y." If a man gives a "y" chromosome, then the result is a boy baby, and since the disease is only carried in the "x" chromosome, a boy can only inherit this disease from his mother. A girl, on the other hand, can inherit the disease from either her father or mother. Interestingly enough, more boys than girls are affected by this disease. Fragile X syndrome appears in children of all ethnic, racial, and eco ...
    Related: down syndrome, fragile, fragile x syndrome, syndrome, northern california
  • Genetic Engineering - 1,131 words
    Genetic Engineering Genetic Engineering Anti-technologists and political extremists misinform, and over exaggerate statements that genetic engineering is not part of the natural order of things. The moral question of genetic engineering can be answered by studying human evolution and the idea of survival of the fittest. The question of safety can be answered by looking at the current precautions of the industry. The concept that society needs to understand is that with the right amount of time and money genetic engineering will help reduce disease and save countless lives. Many people do not realize that genetic engineering plays a role in many lives through out the world. Genetic engineerin ...
    Related: engineering, genetic, genetic code, genetic engineering, nobel prize
  • Genetic Engineering - 1,422 words
    Genetic Engineering Gena Fawley Ethics Doug McKay 1 June, 2000 Genetic Engineering As we begin the twenty first century, many new technological advancements make themselves readily available to us. One such technological advancement is genetic engineering. Genetic engineering is the altering of human genes in order to perfect these genes, or change them completely. This new technology is very controversial, because it deals with things such as altering our own mortality and perhaps creating the perfect human race. Some people however, feel that gene altering is a wonderful new prospect because it may allow us to prevent certain disease, and thus increase our life spans. Also, those that are ...
    Related: engineering, genetic, genetic disease, genetic engineering, genetic screening
  • Genetic Screening - 1,580 words
    Genetic Screening Genetic screening, also known as preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD), is a newly emerging technology that has brought with it much controversy. PGD involves the in vitro fertilization of an embryo. The embryos are allowed to develop to a 6 to 10 cell stage, at which point one of the embryonic cells is removed from each embryo and the cellular DNA is analyzed for chromosomal abnormalities or genetic mutations (Botkin, 1998). In doing this, it can be determined which embryos will be most likely to implant and germinate successfully in the uterus. PGD is a complicated, technologically sophisticated process. It is a union of in vetro fertilization technology and molecular b ...
    Related: genetic, genetic screening, genetic testing, screening, colon cancer
  • Genetics - 2,123 words
    Genetics Genetics: Issues of IVF, screening, pre-selection, genetic testing, cloning and the social implications. James Watson once said, We used to think that our fate was in our stars. Now we know that, in large measure, our fate is in our Genes (Jaroff 1998). On June 26th 2000, The Human Genome Project will unveil its rough draft mapping of the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) sequences within the human chromosomes (genetic code), to the public. The project has been ongoing since the late eighties, and is a huge international exercise, which has so far cost approximately 3 billion dollars. The final draft is expected to be complete by the year 2003 and the assumption is that it will have a mas ...
    Related: genetic code, genetic disease, genetic disorder, genetic screening, genetic testing, genetics
  • Genetics - 241 words
    Genetics Genetics Genetics should be used to improve humans. Genetic alterations would be the most important thing to humans. If you genetically alter a retarded person, you could make them normal. It would cost a lot of money to be genetically altered, but the parents would gladly pay any price to see their child as an acceptable member of society. If you genetically altered a man to be smart when he was an embryo, he could end up inventing a time machine that could change the course of the world. He could end up creating a cure for cancer or AIDS or some other deadly disease. A drawback to that would be that he could take over the world and conquer all with his knowledge. Gene alterations ...
    Related: genetics, time machine, down syndrome, inventing, gene
  • Homosexuality - 1,260 words
    ... enes are arranged along 46 chromosomes and each chromosome contains tiny coils of DNA, deoxyribonucleic acid, which carries the instruction to manufacture a particular body substance. There was no such similar sharing in the same region among heterosexual men. Researchers have not yet compared the homosexuals genetic information to the other group. The finding does not explain all the homosexuals; seven out of forty homosexual brothers did not have the common genetic factor. The explanation for this is it might cause by other unknown genetic influence. (LeVay/Hamer, 27-29). Since the DNA strand is long enough to contain hundreds of genes. Hamers team has not found the gene that makes som ...
    Related: homosexuality, hate crime, genetic research, work cited, clustering
  • Mental Retardation - 363 words
    Mental Retardation In order to be considered mentally retarded, you must have an IQ below 75, have significant limitations in two or more adaptive skill areas, and the condition is present from childhood (defined as age 18 or younger). People can be mentally retarded as all different levels. About 78% of mentally retarded people will only be a little slower than the average person, while in others it is very apparent (Arc of New Jersey). There are many causes of mental retardation. One cause of mental retardation is of genetic conditions. That includes; abnormal gene mixes from parents, errors when genes combine, overexposure to x-rays, and many more reasons. More than 500 genetic diseases a ...
    Related: mental retardation, retardation, mentally retarded, new jersey, rays
  • Mrs Mccaulskydwarfism Reportachondroplasia In Medicine, Achondroplasia Is Known As Being Undersized, Orless Than 50in In Heig - 511 words
    Mrs. McCaulskyDwarfism ReportACHONDROPLASIA In medicine, ACHONDROPLASIA is known as being undersized, orless than 50in. in height. Having short limbs, a normal sized trunk, large headwith a depressed nasal bridge and small face. This is a result of a disease inthe thyroid gland. It can also be caused by Down syndrome or absorption, acartilaginous tissue during the fetal stage. Hypochondroplasia, a mild form ofdwarfism. Spinal tuberculosis and the deficiency of the pituitary glandsecretions. Treatment with thyroxin or thyroid extract early in childhoodresults in normal growth and development. Somatrophin, also known as thehuman growth hormone is secreted by the anterior pituitary. Respiratory ...
    Related: down syndrome, medical information, spinal cord, posture, infancy
  • Racisms - 1,366 words
    Racisms Kwame Anthony Appiah addresses the issues of racialism, intrinsic racism, and extrensic racism in his article entitled RACISMS. However, after analyzing Appiahs views on racism and its different forms, his views on the theoretical validity of racialism and extrinsic racism are seriously doubted. Appiah defines racialism as the view that there are essentail characteristics that allow us to classify people into distinct races, each of which shares certain traits and tendencies. On this topic, Appiah thinks that this theory, or way of categorizing people is false. He thinks that it is merely an excuse for people to practice types of racism. Among the two most distinct types of racism ar ...
    Related: different treatment, moral status, down syndrome, consensus, basketball
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