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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: dissimilar

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  • A Brave New World And 1984 Dissimilar - 1,215 words
    A Brave New World And 1984 Dissimilar A Brave New World and 1984 Dissimilar Although many similarities exist between Aldous Huxleys A Brave New World and George Orwells 1984, the works books though they deal with similar topics, are more dissimilar than alike. A Brave New World is a novel about the struggle of Bernard Marx, who rejects the tenants of his society when he discovers that he is not truly happy. 1984 is the story of Winston who finds forbidden love within the hypocrisy of his society. In both cases, the main character is in quiet rebellion against his government which is eventually found to be in vain. Huxley wrote A Brave New World in the third person so that the reader could be ...
    Related: 1984, brave, brave new world, dissimilar, real world, world history
  • 21st Century - 728 words
    21St Century The 21st Century is just around the corner and with it will come many changes in todays modern society. Changes occur daily, yet taken into view yearly these changes become extremely noticeable. The people of todays society are changing everyday, and therefore so is the world. This report will express personal beliefs on what will occur in the 21st century. Within it are examples such as, crime rates, personalities, religion, and living environments. The 21st Century will bring crime rates to a substantially high rate. In todays society we have a high crime rate. Day by day more crimes are committed, and taken year by year the numbers rise hugely. This only shows that the police ...
    Related: young people, peer pressure, next decade, therapy, decent
  • A Comparison Contrast Of A Brave New World And 1984 - 1,292 words
    A Comparison Contrast of A Brave New World and 1984 Although many similarities exist between Aldous Huxley's A Brave New World and George Orwell's 1984, the works books though they deal with similar topics, are more dissimilar than alike. A Brave New World is a novel about the struggle of Bernard Marx, who rejects the tenants of his society when he discovers that he is not truly happy. 1984 is the story of Winston who finds forbidden love within the hypocrisy of his society. In both cases, the main character is in quiet rebellion against his government which is eventually found to be in vain. Huxley wrote A Brave New World in the third person so that the reader could be allotted a more compr ...
    Related: 1984, brave, brave new world, comparison, contrast, real world, world history
  • A Comparison Contrast Of A Brave New World And 1984 - 1,292 words
    A Comparison Contrast of A Brave New World and 1984 Although many similarities exist between Aldous Huxley's A Brave New World and George Orwell's 1984, the works books though they deal with similar topics, are more dissimilar than alike. A Brave New World is a novel about the struggle of Bernard Marx, who rejects the tenants of his society when he discovers that he is not truly happy. 1984 is the story of Winston who finds forbidden love within the hypocrisy of his society. In both cases, the main character is in quiet rebellion against his government which is eventually found to be in vain. Huxley wrote A Brave New World in the third person so that the reader could be allotted a more compr ...
    Related: 1984, brave, brave new world, comparison, contrast, real world, world history
  • A Comparison Contrast Of A Brave New World And 1984 - 1,292 words
    A Comparison Contrast of A Brave New World and 1984 Although many similarities exist between Aldous Huxley's A Brave New World and George Orwell's 1984, the works books though they deal with similar topics, are more dissimilar than alike. A Brave New World is a novel about the struggle of Bernard Marx, who rejects the tenants of his society when he discovers that he is not truly happy. 1984 is the story of Winston who finds forbidden love within the hypocrisy of his society. In both cases, the main character is in quiet rebellion against his government which is eventually found to be in vain. Huxley wrote A Brave New World in the third person so that the reader could be allotted a more compr ...
    Related: 1984, brave, brave new world, comparison, contrast, real world, world history
  • A Comparison Contrast Of A Brave New World And 1984 - 1,292 words
    A Comparison Contrast of A Brave New World and 1984 Although many similarities exist between Aldous Huxley's A Brave New World and George Orwell's 1984, the works books though they deal with similar topics, are more dissimilar than alike. A Brave New World is a novel about the struggle of Bernard Marx, who rejects the tenants of his society when he discovers that he is not truly happy. 1984 is the story of Winston who finds forbidden love within the hypocrisy of his society. In both cases, the main character is in quiet rebellion against his government which is eventually found to be in vain. Huxley wrote A Brave New World in the third person so that the reader could be allotted a more compr ...
    Related: 1984, brave, brave new world, comparison, contrast, real world, world history
  • A Lesson From Oliver - 5,261 words
    ... had little wish to draw him into this conversation. I decided to change the subject quickly. "Coincidentally, yes sir. Why I'm calling, though, is to inquire about the number of outboard motors that have gone missing since last week." "Pardon me?" The tone of his voice took a sudden sinister turn that sent a twinge through my bladder. Like the rookie I was, I had made some as yet unrecognized blunder. I felt the strong urge to conclude the interview immediately, but it was too late. He knew my name. He knew my brother's name. He knew why I'd called. He knew everything. I'd have to bluff past my own ignorance. "Well, I was wondering if the police suspected some kind of theft ring being i ...
    Related: lesson, oliver, crime scene, media coverage, nash
  • Aesthetics - 921 words
    Aesthetics Kant defined aesthetic as both, "the analysis of taste and the analysis of sensible cognition or intuition" (1). Aesthesis, means "sensation", the Greeks made a distinction between aesthesis autophues (natural sensation) and aesthesis epistemonike (acquired sensation) (1). We may say that aesthetics is both the study of aesthetic objects and of the specific and subjective reactions of observers, readers, or audiences to the work of art. Aesthetics is necessarily interdisciplinary and may be interpretive, prescriptive, descriptive, or a combination of these. The big, obvious question about aesthetic value is whether it is ever 'really in' the objects it is attributed to. This issue ...
    Related: aesthetic experience, bears, realism
  • Alchemy - 1,850 words
    ... e of Hermetic theory and the consciousness in the alchemical mind that what might with success be applied to nature could also be applied to man with similar results. Says Mr. Waite, "The gold of the philosopher is not a metal, on the other hand, man is a being who possesses within himself the seeds of a perfection which he has never realized, and that he therefore corresponds to those metals which the Hermetic theory supposes to be capable of developing the latent possibilities in the subject man." At the same time, it must be admitted that the cryptic character of alchemical language was probably occasioned by a fear on the part of the alchemical mystic that he might lay himself open t ...
    Related: alchemy, first half, chemical analysis, modern science, appeal
  • American And British Hous - 804 words
    American And British Hous annon Modern American and British houses may appear similar from the outside, just as an American may appear similar to an Englishman. One cannot judge a house by its faade, however, and beneath the surface, two altogether different design paradigms exist. The American house is a sprawling retreat that is designed for comfortable living. Compact and efficient, the British house embodies a conservative lifestyle. The two also differ in the amenities they offer. The modern American house overflows with built-in features; the modern British house is sparse in comparison. They are even constructed with dissimilar materials and techniques. Although modern American and Br ...
    Related: american, american home, british, modern american, significant difference
  • Anna Karenina By Leo Tolstoy 1828 1910 - 1,757 words
    Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy (1828 - 1910) Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy (1828 - 1910) Type of Work: Tragic love story Setting Moscow and St. Petersburg, Russia; nineteenth century Principal Characters Robert Jordan, an American fighting with Spanish Loyalists Anna Karenina, a beautiful young woman Alexey, her cold, vindictive husband Count Vronsky, a young military officer who falls in love with Anna Stepan Oblonsky, Anna's spendthrift brother Dolly, Stepan's frustrated wife Kitty, Dolly's sister Levin, Stepan's rusticc friend, and Kitty's suitor Story Overveiw Stepan Oblonsky's wife Dolly had discovered that her husband was having an affair. With her beauty fading and her household a wreck, ...
    Related: anna, anna karenina, karenina, leo tolstoy, tolstoy
  • Araby - 1,644 words
    Araby And Sunrise On Veld Awareness "Araby" by James Joyce and "A Sunrise On The Veld" by Doris Lessing are both short stories in which the protagonists gained a consciousness that was beyond themselves. The main characters are both initiated into new realities and truths of which they were not previously aware. Both short stories will be examined with reflections according to the type of initiation that was experienced, the nature of the narrators, the similar and dissimilar aspects of both characters and various components of the short stories. In the two stories, both characters were experiencing an initiation or awareness of new actualities that were outside of themselves. The main chara ...
    Related: araby, james joyce, the narrator, first person, eager
  • Araby By James Joyce And A Sunrise On The Veld By Doris Lessing - 1,648 words
    Araby by James Joyce and A Sunrise On The Veld by Doris Lessing Araby" by James Joyce and "A Sunrise On The Veld" by Doris Lessing are both short stories in which the protagonists gained a consciousness that was beyond themselves. The main characters are both initiated into new realities and truths of which they were not previously aware. Both short stories will be examined with reflections according to the type of initiation that was experienced, the nature of the narrators, the similar and dissimilar aspects of both characters and various components of the short stories. In the two stories, both characters were experiencing an initiation or awareness of new actualities that were outside of ...
    Related: araby, doris, doris lessing, james joyce, joyce, lessing, sunrise
  • Aristotle On Pleasure - 2,610 words
    Aristotle On Pleasure After nine books of contemplating different aspects of the human good, Aristotle uses this opportunity to claim contemplation as the highest form of pleasure. The final book in Nicomachean Ethics is concerned with pleasures: the understanding of each kind, and why some pleasures are better than other pleasures. The book is essentially divided into two main parts, being pleasure and happiness. I will use Terence Irwin's translation and subdivisions as a guiding map for my own enquiry, and any quotation from will be taken from this text. Irwin divides the book into three sections: Pleasure, Happiness: Further discussion, and Ethics, Moral Education and Politics. With this ...
    Related: aristotle, pleasure, different ways, different aspects, relation
  • Aristotles Politics - 1,064 words
    Aristotle's Politics Aristotle does not regard politics as a separate science from ethics, but as the completion, and almost a verification of it. The moral ideal in political administration is only a different aspect of that which also applies to individual happiness. Humans are by nature social beings, and the possession of rational speech (logos) in itself leads us to social union. The state is a development from the family through the village community, an offshoot of the family. Formed originally for the satisfaction of natural wants, it exists afterwards for moral ends and for the promotion of the higher life. The state in fact is no mere local union for the prevention of wrong doing, ...
    Related: psychological analysis, ideal state, different forms, psychological, gradual
  • Background And Emergence Of Democracy In The British North American Colonies - 730 words
    Background and Emergence of Democracy in the British North American Colonies Beginning in the early 1600's, North America experienced a flood of emigrants from England who were searching for religious freedom, an escape from political oppression, and economic opportunity. Their emigration from England was not forced upon them by the government, but offered by private groups whose chief motive was profit. The emergence of Democracy in colonial America can be attributed to the coming about of several institutions and documents filled with new and "unconventional" ideas that were brought about by a people tired of bickering among themselves and being torn apart by strife. The Anglo-American pol ...
    Related: american, american colonies, american constitution, american political, anglo american, british, british north
  • Background And Emergence Of Democracy In The British North American Colonies - 730 words
    Background and Emergence of Democracy in the British North American Colonies Beginning in the early 1600's, North America experienced a flood of emigrants from England who were searching for religious freedom, an escape from political oppression, and economic opportunity. Their emigration from England was not forced upon them by the government, but offered by private groups whose chief motive was profit. The emergence of Democracy in colonial America can be attributed to the coming about of several institutions and documents filled with new and "unconventional" ideas that were brought about by a people tired of bickering among themselves and being torn apart by strife. The Anglo-American pol ...
    Related: american, american colonies, american constitution, american political, anglo american, british, british north
  • Background And Emergence Of Democracy In The British North American Colonies - 732 words
    Background and Emergence of Democracy in the British North American Colonies Beginning in the early 1600's, North America experienced a flood of emigrants from England who were searching for religious freedom, an escape from political oppression, and economic opportunity. Their emigration from England was not forced upon them by the government, but offered by private groups whose chief motive was profit. The emergence of Democracy in colonial America can be attributed to the coming about of several institutions and documents filled with new and "unconventional" ideas that were brought about by a people tired of bickering among themselves and being torn apart by strife. The Anglo-American pol ...
    Related: american, american colonies, american constitution, american political, anglo american, british, british north
  • Beruit To Jerusalem - 1,033 words
    Beruit To Jerusalem The ongoing problems of the Middle East are complex and difficult to understand. In Beirut to Jerusalem Thomas Friedman uses the different tools to assess the state of affairs in the Middle East. Friedman uses the social sciences to analysis the situation that he observed when he was in Beirut writing for The New York Times. Being that Friedman is Jewish I rode off the book as a one-sided view of the happenings in the Middle East. What I found was quite the opposite; Friedman took a neutral position. Analyzing the situation in the Middle East is by no means an easy thing. There have of course been situations like this in other parts of the world in other times but none ha ...
    Related: jerusalem, palestine liberation, human side, european jews, desert
  • Birth Control - 1,065 words
    ... one sin for which the penalty is national death, race suicide" (Davis 19). It is no wonder that reproduction in America is grossly stratified, especially when our great leaders reflect and reinforce the racist, eugenic, classist notions of acceptable reproduction. Interestingly enough, Roosevelts race suicide arguments drew more people to support the birth control movement, as well as exposed the racial divisions within the movement (Davis 19). The birth control movement reflected and reinforced some of the racial divisions surrounding reproductive rights. Angela Davis explains that birth control. . . is a fundamental prerequisite for the emancipation of women. Since the right of birth c ...
    Related: birth control, control movement, public health, works cited, reimbursement
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