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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: discovering

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  • Discovering Mrs Wright - 1,002 words
    Discovering Mrs. Wright Discovering Mrs. Wright The play "Trifles", by Susan Glaspell , is an examination of the different levels of early 1900's mid-western farming society's attitudes towards women and equality. The obvious theme in this story is men discounting women's intelligence and their ability to play a man's role, as detectives, in the story. A less apparent theme is the empathy the women in the plot find for each other. Looking at the play from this perspective we see a distinct set of characters, a plot, and a final act of sacrifice. The three main characters, Mrs. Peters, the Sheriff's wife, Mrs. Hale and Mrs. Wright are all products of an oppressive society which denies them th ...
    Related: discovering, john wright, wright, different levels, county attorney
  • Discovering Truths - 563 words
    Discovering Truths Discovering Truths and Behaviors How do human beings make decisions? What triggers a person to take action at any given point? Have you ever found yourself asking these questions? An attempt to make sense of these questions can be as easy as studying psychology or the science of the soul. While many people have contributed greatly to the science that seeks to understand human behavior it takes dedication to specialize in this area of work. Completely and exclusively learning, understanding, studying, and explaining the answer to these questions can only be understood by a true psychologist. Psychologists study the behavior of individuals and groups to understand and expla ...
    Related: discovering, doctoral degree, human beings, outlook handbook, occupational
  • More Than Hundred Years Passed Since Marie And Pierre Curie Won The Nobel Prize For Discovering Radioactive Elements Polonium - 724 words
    More than hundred years passed since Marie and Pierre Curie won the Nobel Prize for discovering radioactive elements polonium and radium. The scientific world was excited with the newly discovered force of nature, but they soon realized that that the discovery was not the best for human race. They soon learned that the great discovery was a threat to health. Unfortunately, long time went by until their concerns were taken seriously. Marie Curie denied that radiation was bad for health even though everyone around her, who was exposed to radiation, was dyeing from leukemia. She never fully acknowledged that her work had ruined her health Marie curie herself was chronically ill and nearly blind ...
    Related: curie, discovering, marie, marie curie, nobel, nobel prize, pierre
  • Science Alchemy Alchemy, Ancient Art Practiced Especially In The Middle Ages, Devoted Chiefly To Discovering A Substance That - 850 words
    Science Alchemy Alchemy, ancient art practiced especially in the Middle Ages, devoted chiefly to discovering a substance that would transmute the more common metals into gold or silver and to finding a means of indefinitely prolonging human life. Although its purposes and techniques were dubious and often illusory, alchemy was in many ways the predecessor of modern science, especially the science of chemistry. The birthplace of alchemy was ancient Egypt, where, in Alexandria, it began to flourish in the Hellenistic period; simultaneously, a school of alchemy was developing in China. The writings of some of the early Greek philosophers might be considered to contain the first chemical theorie ...
    Related: alchemy, ancient art, ancient egypt, devoted, discovering, middle ages, modern science
  • 15 Geog 123 - 1,575 words
    15 - GEOG - 123 Anthony November 22, 2000 Travels In Alaska Travels in Alaska takes readers on a trip to Alaska through the vivid descriptions of the author, John Muir. The book is based on journals Muir wrote during his visits to Alaska in 1879, 1880, and 1890. These chronicles of his journey relate his observations of nature, glaciers, and the many people he met. Traveling on foot, by canoe, and dogsled Muir experienced excitement discovering unfamiliar types of lands and animals. Each summer Muir and his new found Presbyterian missionary friend S. Hall Young accompanied by Tlingit Indian guides launched extensive voyages of discovery in a thirty foot canoe. John Muir was a naturalists who ...
    Related: typical american, john muir, gold rush, oval, exploration
  • A Look At Public Key Encryption - 1,210 words
    A Look at Public Key Encryption Encryption is the process of disguising information by transforming plain text into gibberish, or ciphertext, which cannot be understood by an unauthorized person. Decryption is the process of transforming ciphertext back into plaintext that can be read by anyone. Example of encryption can be found in history, for example in the era of the Cold War, the Solviet Union and the United States would send electronic messages to one military point to another, encrypted. If the enemy intercepted the message, they would have to crack this message to get the information. Typically when governments used encryption they used a very complex method of encrypting messages. E ...
    Related: data encryption, encryption, national security, major problem, essence
  • Aborigines And Their Place In Politics - 1,065 words
    Aborigines And Their Place In Politics For much of their history, Australias major parties did not perceive a need to have Aboriginal affairs policies, but this altered in the 1960s and 1970s as the Aboriginal interest came to occupy a more prominent position. The policies of recent major governments, those being the Australian Labor Party (ALP) and the Coalition, consisting of the Liberal Party and National Party, have changed drastically since the Federation of Australia. The approaches throughout history of these major parties will be discussed briefly in order to gain an understanding of the foundation of each partys beliefs and platforms in regards to Aborigines. The main political issu ...
    Related: aborigines, self determination, international legal, aboriginal people, perceive
  • Adrienne Richs Revision - 1,333 words
    Adrienne Rich's Revision The author writes about her personal experience as a woman writer in a male dominated society. Her essay consists of poems, which she had written throughout different times in her life, to demonstrate the transformation in her writing. As a woman writer in a male dominated society, Rich begins writing in the traditional style, "the man's way," but as she continues writing, Rich breaks from these traditional styles to form her own. Like Freire, Rich believes people should break from society and be able to think and question things for themselves. While Freire wants to change the educational system, Rich wants to change writing. Both Freire and Rich want to break from ...
    Related: adrienne, adrienne rich, revision, real life, personal experience
  • Ae Housman: Scholar And Poet - 1,710 words
    ... not in love with him. Consequently, she should exchange her happiness and love for his suffering, thus "lie down forlorn; But the lover will be well." The metaphor Lovers ills are all to buy....Buy them, buy them" is suggesting that the lads happiness is at the maidens expense (Hoagwood 51). Terence Hoagwood claims: The dualized pairs- buy and sell, well and forlorn, lad and maiden- remain opposed (rather than resolved or reconciled) at the poems end, helping to account for the considerable tension that the poem sustains: the contradictions survive, rather than disappearing (as in sentimentalized love poetry) into a happy illusion at the end (Hoagwood 51). In Housmans poetry, he often c ...
    Related: poet, scholar, new jersey, the giver, mood
  • Aerodynamics In Cars - 417 words
    AERODYNAMICS IN CARS Aerodynamics has always been around. People have always been discovering ways to make things travel better and faster through air. Ever since the first man put a sharpened rock on the end of a spear or arrow or made a boomerang come back. Now days people understand the concepts of why certain shapes work better. In aerodynamics new discoveries are being made every day. Aerodynamics is often used in sports. New ideas and discoveries can change the way athletes are able to perform. Without aerodynamics in sports, balls would fall faster and cars would go slower. The importance of aerodynamics has been known throughout most of automobile racing history. In the early days of ...
    Related: aerodynamics, cars, more important, divide, travel
  • Agony And Ectacy - 1,906 words
    Agony and Ectacy THEME: When looking at the life of one of historys greatest men, the lessons we might learn are countless, despite Irving Stones fictional twists. Before we can begin to examine The Agony and the Ecstasy, we must understand Michelangelo and other artists as Stone saw them. Stone considered the artist a creator as well as a part of creation, just as God is seen in many of todays ideologies. Michelangelos life can likewise be paralleled to Genesis. At first Michael is lonely and friendless, he then decides to take up and apprenticeship and create works of art just as the Lord years to love and creates man. His creation however will face the evils of envy and jealousy just as w ...
    Related: agony, family farm, leonardo da vinci, pope julius, disciple
  • Aids - 1,140 words
    ... f the mouth by the fungus Candida Albicans, is common in the early symptomatic phase of AIDS. Other infectious fungi include species of the genus Cryptococcus, a major cause of Meningitis in up to 13 percent of people with AIDS. Also, infection by the fungus Histoplasma Capsulatum affects up to 10 percent of people with AIDS, causing general weight loss, fever, and respiratory complications or severe central nervous system complications if the infection reaches the brain. Viral opportunistic infections, especially with members of the Herpes virus family, are common in people with AIDS. One Herpes family member, Cytomegalovirus (CMV), infects the retina of the eye and can result in blindn ...
    Related: aids, blood cells, nervous system, human cells, nose
  • Albert Einsteinman Of Vision - 1,905 words
    Albert Einstein-Man Of Vision Albert Einstein: Man of Vision Albert Einstein, perhaps the greatest mind ever to have walked the face of the earth, was born on March 14, 1879 in Ulm, Germany. As a boy, he hated school, and felt that the regimented and repetitive nature of schooling in Germany at that time had any promise of helping his future. He did not do well in school, mainly because he did not care to learn what was being taught to him. While he seemed to be a bright child, his schoolwork did not interest him, but at the same time the simple compass that his father owned fascinated him. Albert constantly harassed his father and his Uncle Jake with questions concerning how the compass wor ...
    Related: albert, albert einstein, edwin hubble, teaching methods, discovering
  • Alfred Housman - 1,661 words
    Alfred Housman Alfred Edward Housman, a classical scholar and poet, was born in Fockbury in the county of Worcestershire, England on March 26, 1859. His poems are variations on the themes of mortality and the miseries of human condition (Magill 1411). Most of Housmans poems were written in the 1890s when he was under great psychological stress, which made the tone of his poems characteristically mournful and the mood dispirited (Magill 1411). "In the world of Housmans poetry, youth fades to dust, lovers are unfaithful, and death is the tranquil end of everything (Magill 1412)." Throughout his life, Housman faced many hardships. The loss of his mother at age 12 shattered his childhood and lef ...
    Related: alfred, housman, true meaning, common theme, imagery
  • Alfred Housman - 1,708 words
    ... love with him. Consequently, she should exchange her happiness and love for his suffering, thus"lie down forlorn; But the lover will be well." The metaphor Lovers ills are all to buy....Buy them, buy them" is suggesting that the lads happiness is at the maidens expense (Hoagwood 51). Terence Hoagwood claims: The dualized pairs- buy and sell, well and forlorn, lad and maiden- remain opposed (rather than resolved or reconciled) at the poems end, helping to account for the considerable tension that the poem sustains: the contradictions survive, rather than disappearing (as in sentimentalized love poetry) into a happy illusion at the end (Hoagwood 51). In Housmans poetry, he often concentrat ...
    Related: alfred, housman, critical essays, columbia university, allan
  • All Quiet On The Western Front - 1,065 words
    All Quiet on the Western Front The remains of Paul Baumer's company had moved behind the German front lines for a short rest at the beginning of the novel. After Behm became Paul's first dead schoolmate, Paul viewed the older generation bitterly, particularly Kantorek, the teacher who convinced Paul and his classmates to join the military, feeling alone and betrayed in the world that they had left for him. Paul's generation felt empty and isolated from the rest of the world due to the fact that they had never truly established any part of themselves in civilian life. At boot camp, Himmelstoss abused Paul and his friends, yet the harassment only brought them closer together and developed a st ...
    Related: all quiet on the western front, quiet, mass murder, human beings, bias
  • Alternative Medicine - 1,097 words
    ... d physiological processes are closely linked. The connection between stress and immune system response, for example, is well documented (Epiro and Walsh). Some scientists suggest that the power of prayer and faith healing, like some forms of meditation, might also be physiological in that they may protect the body from the negative effects of stress hormone norepinephrine. In addition, experience shows that relaxation techniques can help patients enormously. 'Medicine is a three-legged stool,' says Dr. Herbert Benson of Harvard Medical School (Epiro and Walsh). 'One leg is pharmaceuticals, the other is surgery, and the third is what people can do for themselves. Mind-body work is an esse ...
    Related: alternative medicine, herbal medicine, medicine, modern medicine, sports medicine
  • American Civil War - 1,064 words
    ... , this would never happen as Lee would surrender to Grant before Sherman could ever get there. General Grant returned back to his troops who were in the process of besieging Petersburg and Richmond. These battles had been up a new plan for a flanking movement against the Confederates right below Petersburg. It would be the first large-scale operation to take place this year and would begin five days later. Two days after grant made preparations to move again, Lee had already assessed the situation informed President Davis that Richmond and Petersburg were doomed. Lees only chance would be to move his troops out of Richmond and down a southwestern path toward a meeting with fellow general ...
    Related: american, american civil, american civil war, civil war, general sherman
  • American Dominance By Kesey - 1,009 words
    ... g of the river, and makes his life frustrating and challenging. Throughout the book, the river is always Hank's potential enemy. He is constantly checking the bank to see how much the water had risen. "...Hank was worried that the boats might be swept loose from their moorings, as they had been last year,...Before going to bed, he put on rubber boots over his pajamas and pulled on a poncho and went out with a lantern to check....Hank noted the water's height on the marker at the dock--black water swirling at the number five; five feet, then, above the normal high tide mark..." (105-106) Hank is constantly haunted by paranoia about the river rising and destroying his belongings. This is h ...
    Related: american, american ideal, dominance, early american, ken kesey, kesey
  • American Dominance By Kesey - 1,009 words
    ... g of the river, and makes his life frustrating and challenging. Throughout the book, the river is always Hank's potential enemy. He is constantly checking the bank to see how much the water had risen. "...Hank was worried that the boats might be swept loose from their moorings, as they had been last year,...Before going to bed, he put on rubber boots over his pajamas and pulled on a poncho and went out with a lantern to check....Hank noted the water's height on the marker at the dock--black water swirling at the number five; five feet, then, above the normal high tide mark..." (105-106) Hank is constantly haunted by paranoia about the river rising and destroying his belongings. This is h ...
    Related: american, american ideal, dominance, early american, ken kesey, kesey
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