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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: different cultures

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  • Diversity In The Workplace 8211 How Different Cultures Helped Shape Our Nation - 1,986 words
    Diversity In The Workplace - How Different Cultures Helped Shape Our Nation Diversity in the Workplace - How Different Cultures Helped Shape Our Nation Today the United States of America is regarded as a global economic leader. The standard of living in the U.S. is higher than that of most other nations. Our nation is considered an economic super-power. Economic needs have often caused Americans to seek immigrants as workers, and economic opportunities have attracted foreigners. The United States is a nation of immigrants. Our nation has been shaped by successive waves of immigrants who have played major roles in our changing economy. The overwhelming majority of immigrants who enter the Uni ...
    Related: cultural diversity, different cultures, diversity, diversity in the workplace, workplace
  • South America Is A Land Of Different Cultures And Has A History - 996 words
    South America is a land of different cultures and has a history of as many different types of government, mostly dictatorships. Most of South America won independence from Spain and Portugal between 1810 and 1824. In 1823, President James Monroe enunciated the first US policy on Latin America. The Monroe Doctrine warned European nations against interfering in the affairs of independent nations in the Western Hemisphere. In 1904, Roosevelt's Corollary said the US would act as a "policeman", intervening militarily when US interests were at risk. After W.W.II, the independent countries of the Western Hemisphere formed the Organization of American States, a military alliance to prevent aggressio ...
    Related: america, america today, different cultures, different types, history, latin america, south america
  • Throughout History Marijuana Has Been Used To Serve Various Purposes In Many Different Cultures The Purposes Have Changed Ove - 653 words
    Throughout history marijuana has been used to serve various purposes in many different cultures. The purposes have changed over time to fit in with the current lifestyles. This pattern is also true in American history. The use of marijuana has adapted to the social climate of the time. Marijuana, whose scientific name is cannibis sativa, was mentioned in historical manuscripts as early as 2700 B. C. in China. (Grolier Electronic Encyclopedia, 1995). The cultivation of the marijuana plant began as far back as the Jamestown settlers, around 1611, who used hemp produced from the marijuana plant's fibers to make rope and canvas. It was also used in making clothing because of it's durability. The ...
    Related: american history, different cultures, history, marijuana, marijuana prohibition, medical marijuana
  • A Comparison Of Early Civilizations - 1,178 words
    A comparison of Early Civilizations A comparison of Early civilizations After reading the articles on early civilization, I've identified several similarities and differences about the people who were from these three cultures. The civilizations in the articles include, the people from Mesopotamia, the Quiche' Indians, a tribe in early Meso-America, and "The book of Genesis" which offers a Christian or biblical explanation of how our own civilization originated. I will tell you about how they believed they came into existence and what they thought they should do to ensure their civilization continued. The three stories offered insight on how the different cultures lived by describing how the ...
    Related: comparison, good and evil, adam and eve, christian belief, adam
  • A World Of Diversity - 614 words
    A World of Diversity Ethnocentric, derived from the Greek words of Ethnos, meaning race, people or cultural group, and Kentrikos, meaning concentrated about or directed to a center is a word that greatly describes many cultures on this planet we call Earth . The official definition of Ethnocentric is " characterized or based on the attitude that ones own group is superior" or "having race as a central interest". There is a whole world of problems, politics, and, other cultures, but it seems that the average Americans only interest is that of themselves. The reason I chose to focus more on the American being ethnocentric is because I have been exposed the most to this culture. Why is it that ...
    Related: diversity, world politics, world view, foreign countries, simon fraser university
  • Adult Entertainment And First Ammendment Rights - 1,283 words
    Adult Entertainment And First Ammendment Rights The essence of the American dream stems from freedom. Before this nation was even called the United States of America, religious separatists ventured across the Atlantic Ocean so that they would be free to practice a religion that was not controlled by the state. Today, we find ourselves in a constant battle with ethics, morals and values in the United States. Seeing that we are a nation that is culturally diverse myriad of cultures and religions has been mixed together and the final outcome is the society that we live in today. A serious conflict between the "morally correct" and the "ethically deficient" is the topic of sex and sexuality. Mos ...
    Related: adult, ammendment, constitutional rights, entertainment, first amendment
  • Affirmative Action - 1,098 words
    Affirmative Action Affirmative Action ? The Right Approach? In the beginning, it seemed simple enough. In 1961, John F. Kennedy, then president of the United States of America, established the Committee on Equal Employment Opportunity by executive order. The goal was to curb discrimination by the government and its contractors, who were now required to ?not discriminate against any employee or applicant for employment because of race, creed, color, or national origin. The Contractor will take affirmative action, to ensure that applicants are employed, and that employees are treated during employment, without regard to their race, creed, color, or national origin.? Title VI of the Civil Right ...
    Related: affirmative, affirmative action, equal employment, lyndon b johnson, adopt
  • Affirmative Action - 1,553 words
    Affirmative Action Affirmative Action Affirmative action is one of the more recent and popular civil rights policies that affect today's society. Affirmative action can be described as nothing more than a lower educational standard for minorities. It has become quite clear that affirmative action is unfair and unjust. However, in order to blend race, culture, and genders to create a stable and diverse society, someone has to give. How can this be justified? Is there a firm right or wrong to affirmative action? Is this policy simply taking something from one person and giving it to someone else, or is there more to this policy, such as affirmative action being a reward for years of oppression ...
    Related: action plan, affirmative, affirmative action, duke university, executive order
  • Affirmative Action - 1,056 words
    Affirmative Action This paper was written to show how Affirmative Action took place. It deals with the idea that diversity management does not decrease ethnic and gender tensions while increasing profits, productivity and creativity, but it has served a general purpose to aware people of different cultures, and establish a justification to make everybody equal in opportunity not based in race, sex, nor culture. It also includes a history of the Affirmative Action. The different paths it has taken along the development it has undergone as time has gone by, from its beginning as a Civil Rights Act to the Affirmative Action it is today. Statement of Purpose The three members of the group are me ...
    Related: affirmative, affirmative action, african american, president johnson, hire
  • Afriancan Americans Role Of Television - 1,151 words
    ... gets high before he is about to audition. In predominately Caucasian sitcoms, like Frasier or Veronica's Closet, viewers will not see this type of portrayal. In Frasier, the character Frasier plays a psychologist and his brother plays a doctor. In Veronica's Closet, everyone works at a successful designing agency. When viewers turn on the WB and the UPN network they see these types of degrading African American shows. There are blocks of African American shows on Fridays and Mondays. The television companies do not even try mixing these shows with the Caucasian sitcoms. They bunch them all together, making it seem like these are the only types of shows African Americans are capable of p ...
    Related: african american, american life, television, television shows, real world
  • American Studies - 1,845 words
    American Studies Understanding America November 11, 1999 Midterm Examination American Studies can be a variety of different meanings to a lot of different authors. They are all pretty much on the same note, but with different alterations. For me, I believe that it is to make connections between the past and how it will impact the future. American Studies has transformed overtime. Each individual has their own beliefs and feelings of what it really means. In Gene Wise's article he states how he is interested in how the field of American Studies has transformed overtime, what American Studies methodology is, and the types of questions that American Studies practitioners ask. I believe that the ...
    Related: african american, american, american culture, american history, american mind, american studies, early american
  • Ancient Peruvian Ceramics Of The North Coast - 1,143 words
    Ancient Peruvian Ceramics Of The North Coast Ancient Peruvian Ceramics of the North Coast March 11, 1997 The first pottery pieces found in Peru were made somewhere between 1500 and 1000 b.p. The pieces were found in the central Andean region where a religious cult lived. This cult was called Chavn, after the best known ceremonial center, Chavn de Huntar. The religious center was the home to massive temples that were highly embellished with low relief sculptures of gods, animals, and symbols. The pottery found in the area where vessels that were well made and highly decorated with a similar motif as the temples. But the evolution of Peruvian pottery becomes somewhat confusing and complex afte ...
    Related: ceramics, coast, peruvian, daily life, different cultures
  • And Media Effect - 1,265 words
    ... on discovered that female athletes have been underrepresented in the media for quite some time. Studies show that only %15 of coverage in newspapers and %5 of television air time has been given to covering female athletes. (Fink 1998) These experiments and surveys correlate with another experiment conducted by John Steel, "A survey has indicated that around two-thirds of young people base their moral judgements on how a decision made them feel and whether it helped them succeed. Electronic media support these views and increase the importance of self" (Steel 1997). The on-campus experiment contained statistical questions that pertained to situations that people may have learned about on ...
    Related: electronic media, mass media, media, media coverage, media research, media studies
  • Ap 1996 Number 1 Answer - 641 words
    Ap 1996 Number 1 Answer Social and biological factors have an impact on body weight, perception, alcoholism, extroversion, and schizophrenia in the individual. Many social characteristics of individuals are associated with body weight in societies of today. Factors, such as gender, age, ethnicity, the occupation, household size, income, education received, and marriage can have an impact on body weight. Females tend to have more stored body fat than the males, which can cause them to be more likely to be obese. As social roles and expectations increase, obesity and other weight problems tend to increase as the person ages. In the ethnic variations, the minority seemed to have more of a weigh ...
    Related: over time, lose weight, family history, peer, external
  • Are Moral Standards Relative - 1,036 words
    ARE MORAL STANDARDS "RELATIVE"? Ethics are moral principles or values that specify acceptable conduct, and determine how an institution will be governed. According to Shanahan and Wang, in their book Reason and Insight, the subject of ethics is morality, which is concerned with the practices, judgments, principles, and beliefs that guide peoples actions. It attempts to address the issue of how we ought to live. Many people have different values that guide their lives, but some of these values are better supported than others. Since people have different morals and values, it is important to distinguish between cultural and moral relativism. First, I will explain the difference between moral ...
    Related: moral code, relative, different ways, basic principles, variance
  • Art Expression - 1,117 words
    Art Expression Before the portrayal of the human body can be critiqued, you must understand the artist's culture. As man evolved over centuries, his views of the body also transformed. Our tour definitely showed the drastic changes in different cultures' art. Each culture and era presents very distinct characteristics. Through time and experimentation, we have expressed our views of the human body clearly with our art. Egyptians were the first people to make a large impact on the world of art. Egyptians needed art for their religious beliefs more than decoration or self-gratification. The most important aspect of Egyptian life is the ka, the part of the human spirit that lives on after death ...
    Related: modern art, egyptian art, christian art, invented, exploring
  • Art Expression - 1,116 words
    ... . Bibliography Before the portrayal of the human body can be critiqued, you must understand the artist's culture. As man evolved over centuries, his views of the body also transformed. Our tour definitely showed the drastic changes in different cultures' art. Each culture and era presents very distinct characteristics. Through time and experimentation, we have expressed our views of the human body clearly with our art. Egyptians were the first people to make a large impact on the world of art. Egyptians needed art for their religious beliefs more than decoration or self-gratification. The most important aspect of Egyptian life is the ka, the part of the human spirit that lives on after d ...
    Related: greek art, medieval art, religion and politics, walking, stance
  • Art Of Portraiture - 843 words
    Art Of Portraiture The three works that I chose that are art of portraiture are Head of a King, Mask of an Lyoba, and Mother Goddess. The first two portraits are West African Art from two different tribes, Ife, who created the Head of a King and Benin, whom created the Mask of an Lyoba. The Mother Goddess is an Aztec piece. These groups of people are from different cultures, time periods, and share different religious beliefs. The similarity of the groups is the symbolic meaning the portraitures brought to its people. The first work is the Head of a King. This Ife creation altered the perception that scholars had of the tribe. It was known that the Ife tribes did not do portraits because of ...
    Related: portraiture, aztec empire, mother goddess, different cultures, drew
  • Art: The Ultimate Expression - 1,126 words
    Art: The Ultimate Expression Art: The Ultimate Expression Before the portrayal of the human body can be critiqued, you must understand the artist's culture. As man evolved over centuries, his views of the body also transformed. Our tour definitely showed the drastic changes in different cultures' art. Each culture and era presents very distinct characteristics. Through time and experimentation, we have expressed our views of the human body clearly with our art. Egyptians were the first people to make a large impact on the world of art. Egyptians needed art for their religious beliefs more than decoration or self-gratification. The most important aspect of Egyptian life is the ka, the part of ...
    Related: subject matter, religion and politics, christian art, longevity, unnatural
  • As The World Grows So Do Our Challenges - 539 words
    As The World Grows So Do Our Challenges As the world grows so do our challenges. Not only are our problems growing in number but they are also growing in complexity. There is scarcely a day that goes by when I don't hear about some new problem that will soon threaten us all. While some of these problems such as El Nino, earthquakes, and other natural disasters cannot be stopped -- there are other challenges such as the spread of racial hatred, rising risk of disease spread, and the growing levels of civil unrest throughout much of the world which threaten many lives everyday. Most of the future's challenges will only be made possible if all people, regardless of race, color, or nationality, ...
    Related: world peace, health problems, natural disasters, exchange student, unity
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