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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: dictionary

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  • A Hero Is Defined By Websters Dictionary As A Courageous, Valorous - 1,352 words
    A hero is defined by Websters dictionary as a courageous, valorous man. There are many people in history that society deems or defines as heroes. An example of a hero from our past is Martin Luther King Jr.. He went against all odds in his fight for freedom. There are fictional heroes that can be considered heroes as well. Superman and his antics in saving the planet are in many ways considered heroism. Many sports stars and actors are considered by many as heroic figures. Mario Lemiux won his battle with Hotchkins Disease, a form of cancer, to win a completely different battle, the Stanley Cup. A hero is a person or character that defies all odds in order to achieve both the respect and ido ...
    Related: dictionary, martin luther king jr, fictional character, king hamlet, seeking
  • Physics Geosynchronous Orbits Geosynchronous Orbits Geostationary Orbits Websters Dictionary Defines A Geostationary Orbit As - 326 words
    Physics Geosynchronous Orbits Geosynchronous Orbits + Geostationary Orbits Webster's dictionary defines a Geostationary orbit as of, relating to, or being a satellite that travels above Earth's equator from west to east at an altitude of approximately 35,900 kilometers (22,300 miles) and at a speed matching that of Earth's rotation, thus remaining stationary in relation to Earth. 2. Of, relating to, or being the orbit of such a satellite. In plain English, a satellite matches the earth's rotation making it seemingly hover over one spot of the globe enabling coverage of half the earth's surface. Three such satellites, appropriately spaced longitudinally, have worldwide coverage except for rel ...
    Related: dictionary, orbit, physics, plain english, communications
  • Prejudice Is Defined In The Dictionary As Hatred Or Unfair Treatment Of A Particular Group, Such As Members Of A Race Or Reli - 318 words
    Prejudice is defined in the dictionary as hatred or unfair treatment of a particular group, such as members of a race or religion. Although prejudice has a definite definition in the dictionary, the novel;To Kill A Mockingbird teaches us that there are many diferent form of prejudice. In the novel, Harper Lee used many different types of prejudice such as stereotyping, racism, and segregation. During the novel, Harper Lee uses segregation as a form of prejudice. One of the many examples of segregation was when the black people were confined to a diferent church. White people went to whites churches and balck people went to balack churches. Balck people were also segregated during the Tom Rob ...
    Related: dictionary, hatred, prejudice, unfair, different forms
  • Psychology Meditation Websters Dictionary Defines Meditation As To Reflect On Ponder, To Engage In Contemplation, Which It Re - 738 words
    Psychology Meditation Webster's dictionary defines meditation as "to reflect on; ponder, to engage in contemplation," which it really is, although, many people believe that meditation is a means of developing a more spiritual or religious life. Meditation does not necessarily have to be religious. Many people just meditate to relax or organize their thoughts. Meditation is a very broad subject since there are many ways in which to perform meditation. Not only are there many ways but, there are also many different religions associated with meditation. Not only is meditation good for the soul but, it is also good for the mind. I myself have experimented with meditation and have found it to be ...
    Related: dictionary, engage, meditation, psychology, reflect
  • Research Paper A Fraternity, As Defined By The The American Heritage Dictionary Is A Chiefly Social Organization Of Male Coll - 1,479 words
    RESEARCH PAPER A fraternity, as defined by the The American Heritage Dictionary is "a chiefly social organization of male college students, usually designated by Greek letters."(pg. 523) This definition, however, is very limited and leaves plenty of space for short sighted people to believe the stereotype conveyed by the popular media, where fraternity members are depicted as drunks who accomplish nothing either scholastically or socially. Unfortunately, both this definition and media portrayals fail to mention the fact that membership in a fraternity is a life-long experience that helps its members develop social, organizational, and study skills during college, and that teaches true, everl ...
    Related: american, american heritage, coll, dictionary, heritage, heritage dictionary, research paper
  • The Verb Impeach As Defined By Websters Third International Dictionary Is To Cause An Official To Be Removed From Office Beca - 1,172 words
    The verb "impeach" as defined by Webster's Third International Dictionary is to cause an official to be removed from office because of conviction of impropriety, misdemeanor, or misconduct while in said office. The right to impeach public officials is secured by the U.S. Constitution in Article I, Sections 2 and 3, which discuss the procedure, and in Article II, Section 4, which indicates the grounds for impeachment: "the President, Vice President, and all civil officers of the United States shall be removed from office on impeachment for, and conviction of, treason, bribery, or other high crimes and misdemeanors." Treason and bribery are specified by the framers as "high crimes," however, i ...
    Related: dictionary, international dictionary, third international, verb, william jefferson clinton
  • There Are Many Definitions Of The Word Blindness In The Dictionary Two - 444 words
    There are many definitions of the word blindness in the dictionary. Two of them pertain to the story about Oedipus and Teiresias. Both of the men are blind, but they each possess a different type of blindness. The type of blindness possessed by Oedipus is probably worse than the type of blindness possessed by Teiresias. Blindness, as defined by the American Heritage Dictionary, can mean one of two things. The first definition is sightless or complete loss of sight. The second definition is the inability or unwillingness to perceive or understand. This definition would be used in a sentence as: ones blindness to anothers faults. When I think of the word blindness I think of it in two respects ...
    Related: blindness, dictionary, heritage dictionary, american heritage, king oedipus
  • Topic: American History Winthrop, Hutchinson Political Morality In Websters Dictionary, Morality Is Defined As Principles Of - 901 words
    topic: American History- Winthrop, Hutchinson Political Morality In Webster's dictionary, morality is defined as "principles of right and wrong in conduct; ethics." The principles of morality have countless times evolved over the ages. In earlier times, death was an easy penalty for many crimes. These crimes today are considered minor and are penalized with a slap on the hand. Is this considered wrong? Who is the correct authority to consult on what is right or wrong? In today's society, two major factors concern how the way members of society act and behave. The first is our national government. Members of our government in positions of authority decide everything in our lives in the form o ...
    Related: american, american history, anne hutchinson, history, hutchinson, morality
  • What Is War Websters Encyclopedic Dictionary Describes It As: An Armed Clash Between Nations Or Factions In The Same Nation T - 1,726 words
    What is war? Websters Encyclopedic Dictionary describes it as: "an armed clash between nations or factions in the same nation." Thats how a dictionary describes it, but in fact, it is something much worse. War is the epitome of what is wrong with human nature. War is devastating. Perhaps no other war was as devastating as World War II. (1)"World War II killed more people, destroyed more property, disrupted more lives, and had more far-reaching consequences than any other war in history. It brought about the downfall of Western Europe as the center of world power and led to the rise of the Soviet Union. The development of the atomic bomb in 1945 would begin nuclear war." There is no one simpl ...
    Related: armed, clash, dictionary, secretary of state, american citizen
  • Peter Gospel - 1,564 words
    1 Peter Gospel Biblical historians have many different opinions on who is responsible for the authorship of the New Testament writings. Concentrating on 1 and 2 Peter, their different conclusions can be analyzed. Scholars approach the study of authorship by carefully going over the writings themselves. They discover the how, when, why, who, and where of the writings. Each New Testament scholar has come to their own conclusion of the authorship of 1 and 2 Peter through this. Their different views of the authorship of 1 and 2 Peter will be discussed and compared in this paper. 1 Peter is a New Testament writing. It has only five chapters that seems to portray the purpose of bringing hope to Ch ...
    Related: gospel, peter, simon peter, oxford university, asia minor
  • 1984 - 249 words
    1984 The lesson to be learned from George Orwell's 1984 is that an "ideal" of having a Utopian society will never really work. George Orwell may have written 1984, in order to show us that every society has it's ups and downs and that no matter how hard you work to keep the society perfect there will always be flaws. In the book 1984, the society in which the people lived was completely opposite to what most people would see as "utopia". As defined by the New Scholastic Dictionary the word "Utopia" means: a place where everything is perfect and everyone is happy. This is far from the life that the people lived in 1984. There was a lot of hate throughout the book, and with hate comes unhappin ...
    Related: 1984, utopian society, main character, george orwell, lesson
  • 1984 By George Orwell - 681 words
    1984 By George Orwell "Nineteen Eighty Four" Fictional World In English this semester we have studied three different texts. All three texts were based on original, fictional worlds. The fictional world which stood out above the rest and really amazed me would have to be Nineteen Eighty-Four. Nineteen Eighty-Four was the most realistic out of the three. While reading the novel you really get into the fictional world and think like the main character Winston Smith. Three aspects of the text which made this world so interesting to study were The Inner Party, Big Brother, and the Thought Police. Each of these interesting aspects in Nineteen Eighty Four play a great part in the novel itself and ...
    Related: 1984, george orwell, orwell, big brother, winston smith
  • 1984 By George Orwell 1903 1950 - 1,843 words
    1984 by George Orwell (1903 - 1950) 1984 by George Orwell (1903 - 1950) Type of Work: Futuristic, cautionary novel Setting London, in the mythical country of Oceania; 1984 (in the future) Principal Characters Winston Smith, a rebel against society Julia, his lover Mr. Charrington, an elderly antique shop owner O'Brien, the only member of the Inner Party Winston trusts Story Overveiw As Winston Smith entered his apartment building, he passed a familiar poster. "It was one of those pictures which are so contrived that the eyes follow you about when you move. BIG BROTHER IS WATCHING YOU, the caption beneath it ran." Then Winston opened the door to his flat to be greeted by a voice on his "teles ...
    Related: 1984, george orwell, orwell, political system, totalitarian regime
  • 3 Non Traditional Religions Voodoo, Spiritualism, Cults - 1,932 words
    ... Evil Deeds done on Earth, VII. Eternal Progress Open to every Human Soul. (Spiritualism) Spiritualists are often accused of being atheists or Anti-Christian, yet our first Principle recognizes God as our Father; but who is God?. Spiritualism is universal religion recognizing such leaders as Buddha, Mohammed, Moses as well as Jesus. It does not however, claim a monopoly of Religion. Ones religion is a personal matter and any person adopting Spiritualism is free to interpret the principles according to their own awareness. Furthermore, they do not believe in a Vindictive God. They are their own judges and they shall receive compensation or retribution for what ever they have done whether ...
    Related: human soul, psychological effects, encarta online, accused, steven
  • 65279 The Life And Works Of James Weldon Johnson - 1,420 words
    THE LIFE AND WORKS OF JAMES WELDON JOHNSON James Weldon Johnson was a writer, diplomat, professor, and editor,who also described himself as a man of letters and a civil rights leader. Even though, he is no longer living, James Weldon Johnson has left much abouthis contributions to African American literature. Johnson was born June 17,1871 in Jacksonville, Florida to James and Helen Louise (Dallied) Johnson. Johnsons father, James Johnson, was born a freeman and was of mixed ancestry. He was a headwaiter in St. James Hotel. Mr. Johnson taughthis son how to speak Spanish as a young boy. Johnsons mother, Helen Johnson, was born a free woman in the West Indies. Mrs. Helen was awoman of French an ...
    Related: james weldon johnson, johnson, weldon, weldon johnson, works cited
  • Towards Innovation - 1,518 words
    "Towards Innovation" The world today is experiencing the most rapid pace of change in its history. The purpose of this essay is to discuss what organizational structure is suitable in the business circumstances of today. This essay will argue that 'the environment of the 21st century is such, that to be effective, organizations are tending towards less formalized structures than used in the past'. To support this argument, firstly organizations will be defined, and then the properties that make an organization effective will be identified. Next organizational structure will be appraised, and what constitutes business environment will be established. Finally the influences globalisation and t ...
    Related: innovation, information exchange, work activities, business environment, workforce
  • A Look Into Music Technologies: - 1,585 words
    A Look Into Music Technologies: A LOOK INTO MUSIC TECHNOLOGIES: HOW HAS THE INFORMATIONAL AGE INFLUENCE MUSIC? INTRODUCTION As we enter a new millennia, so will our music. The entire field of music has experienced dramatic changes due to the post- industrial/ informational age. This paper will focus primarily on the expansion of musical research and the development of new tools to aid in learning. The overall reaction details innovations that enhance and expand the depths of music. RESEARCH In the 1970's, the US government underwent a secret project making an underground port of communication. This project created what we now know as the Internet. The term Internet is often used to describe ...
    Related: music, world wide, global communication, internet service provider, station
  • A Modest Proposal - 1,260 words
    A Modest Proposal Unlike most essays, Jonathan Swift's A Modest Proposal is written for the reader to see through what the narrator is expressing. The narrator does not want the reader to agree that the solution to overpopulation and poverty in Ireland is to eat babies, he wants the reader to see there needs to be a practical solution. By stating the advantages and objections to his proposal, using ironic words and phrases, he directs the reader not to see the apparent, but the implicit. Swift's narrative voice metaphorically compares the Irish to pigs and cows, which implies the Irish are being treated subhumanly. Although something seems one way to the narrator, Jonathan Swift wants the re ...
    Related: modest, modest proposal, proposal, harcourt brace, young children
  • A Separate Peace: Chapter 1 - 5,662 words
    ... truth, the shadowy, elusive truth of an instant that is already beginning to fade in memory. Gene is about to make a full confession--or he thinks he is--when Dr. Stanpole and the nurse arrive. The following day Finny is sent home to recuperate. The summer session comes to an end, appropriately enough for Gene, for until now summer had represented freedom, sports, and running outdoors, with Finny as the light and life of it all. Now all that has changed. A month later, after a sojourn at home, Gene heads back to school for his senior year. On the way he makes a detour to call on Finny. NOTE: The "surprise" reunion is no surprise to Finny, who appears to have been waiting anxiously in hop ...
    Related: separate peace, ultimate punishment, last time, self awareness, burning
  • A Silent Childhood - 1,109 words
    A Silent Childhood A Silent Childhood Childhood is such a precious, yet trenchant part of life. We all have memories of our days as children along with stories of lessons learned. Childhood is reflected by most as being a time of bliss and enlightenment. As I recall my childhood an avalanche of mixed feelings suffocates me. Would I be able to interpret these feelings if I had not learned language? More importantly, is it possible to teach language after the critical period has been extinguished? This is the prominent question that arose in my mind as I read A Silent Childhood. The researchers' goal was to establish if Genie was capable of language after eleven years of isolation. Also, how m ...
    Related: silent, physical therapy, human race, noam chomsky, stable
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