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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: dialysis

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  • Arsenic - 1,849 words
    ... arsenic and toxicology are interested in the pending crisis in India because of the wealth of information to be gained. It would be possible to discover what diseases arsenic causes and the information learned could help countries such as Taiwan, Chile, and Mongolia, where there are large problems with arsenic contamination. (Bagla and Kaiser 1996) Response from the Indian government to the crisis is low. They had approved a project that costs $25 million in 1995 that would supply piped water to the Malda district, but there has been scant improvement. In fact, the problem has grown more widespread. Tube wells that were not previously contaminated are now tainted and the federal governme ...
    Related: arsenic, protection agency, problems caused, indian government, stomach
  • Assisted Suicide - 1,811 words
    Assisted Suicide Forty-one year-old Peter Cinque was in the terminal stages of diabetes. He was blind, had lost both legs, and suffered from ulcers and cardiovascular problems, as well. He was being kept alive by a kidney dialysis machine. Then one day he asked his doctors to stop the treatment. As a conscious, rational adult, he had the legal right to determine what should or should not be done to his body. But the hospital authorities refused to honor this right until he had been examined by two psychiatrists to test his mental competence. After this, the hospital obtained a court order that required him to continue with dialysis treatments. A few days later, Mr. Cimque stopped breathing. ...
    Related: assisted suicide, suicide, medical care, slippery slope, joyce
  • Cloning Issue - 1,285 words
    Cloning Issue Genesis 11:1-9 records the sad story of the building of the tower of Babel. That project stands out as the first chapter in a story that continues to this day, and includes many similar kind of undertakings. As technology and ability increase so does man's ability to do things that are ultimately not in his best interest. The first objection is that cloning is not wise. Wisdom is knowing the end of a matter from the beginning. Proverbs 14:15 tells us "The naive believes everything, But the sensible man considers his steps." It is sensible or prudent to think carefully about the path we are walking, and where it will lead us. Proverbs 22:3 reminds us "A prudent man foresees evil ...
    Related: cloning, human cloning, bone marrow, st louis, draw
  • Coli Bacteria - 459 words
    E Coli Bacteria For those who follow the rules of good nutrition by eating healthy foods, the rewards can be substantial. But it's also important that you clean and cook your food properly. Because if you don't, certain microorganisms that hitchhike into your stomach can make you feel miserable. E. coli is a bacteria that normally live in the intestines of humans and animals. Although, most strains of this bacteria are harmless, several are known to produce toxins that can cause diarrhea. One particular E. coli strain can cause severe diarrhea and kidney damage E. coli made a notorious appearance at a fast-food restaurant chain about three years ago, sickening hundreds and killing four child ...
    Related: bacteria, coli, fast food, good nutrition, carefully
  • Concern Of The Health Care System - 492 words
    Concern of the Health Care System Throughout the United States there has been an overwhelming concern as to the status of the present health care system. Approximately 100,000 people lose their health insurance each month. Unfortunately the present system does little to nothing to aid these people. It is for this reason that various managed health care plans have come into existence and use. Managed health care is a system by which an outside body, such as a state or federal government places regulations on the health care process. St. Luke/ Roosevelt Hospital in Manhattan is currently operating under a managed health care plan. Vickie Powell, In-patient Pharmacy Supervisor at St. Luke/ Roos ...
    Related: care plan, care system, health, health care, health insurance, managed care, universal health
  • Diabetes - 1,248 words
    Diabetes Diabetes is a very grave and serious disease involving many hardships, but a good diet, exercise, and overall healthy habits can keep your diabetes under control which in-turn makes you feel better and avoid later complications. Diabetes is a disease in which the body does not produce enough insulin, a hormone needed to convert the sugars and starches that we eat into energy needed for daily life. The cause of the disease is a mystery, but genetics and environment seem to play major roles. There are two kinds of Diabetes, Diabetes Insipidus and the more common Diabetes Mellitus. Diabetes Insipidus is a rare disease caused by a deficiency of vasopressin, a hormone of the posterior pi ...
    Related: diabetes, diabetes insipidus, diabetes mellitus, blood pressure, immune system
  • Ethics Of Animal Testing - 1,763 words
    Ethics Of Animal Testing This theme song to a popular cartoon is a farce dealing with experiments carried out on animals. In the cartoon one mouse is made very smart and wants to take over the world while the other is clearly not as smart. While the cartoon makes jokes, the reality is that mice and other animals re being used for medical tests every day. For some people this testing brings up ethical questions. One of the biggest questions: is it really necessary to take the lives of animals in the name of science and for the betterment of humanity? For animal rights activists, like People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA), the answer is no. PETA pressures labs into halting experim ...
    Related: animal experimentation, animal liberation, animal research, animal rights, animal rights movement, animal testing, animal welfare
  • Health Maintenance Organizations - 928 words
    Health Maintenance Organizations Throughout history, America has always strived for freedom and quality of life. Wars were fought and people died to preserve these possessions. We are now in a time where we may see these ideals crumble like dust in the wind. Health Maintenance Organizations, HMOs are currently depriving millions of people from quality health acre and freedom of choice. This is occurring because people who are enrolled in HMOs are unable to choose the doctor that they want. Also patients lose the quality of care because HMOs interfere with the health care providers decisions. The Health Maintenance Organization has been proven to"sometimes interfere with physicians exercise o ...
    Related: health, health care, health maintenance, health plan, maintenance, maintenance organization, organizations
  • Human Disease Research - 2,361 words
    ... ical retardation. Abnormal development of any body part in a fetus may produce a congenital defect; for example, if walls that separate the chambers of the heart fail to form completely, the baby is born with congenital heart disease. BImmunological Diseases Immunological diseases occur when the immune system, which normally protects against infections, malfunctions. The most common types of immunological diseases are allergies, autoimmune diseases, and immune deficiencies. An allergy is an abnormal reaction of the immune system to foreign substances, such as plant pollen, fungal spores, animal danders, medications, and foods. Rhus dermatitis is an allergy caused by contact with urushiol ...
    Related: cardiovascular disease, disease research, heart disease, human body, human disease, human history, human population
  • Kidneys, Who Needs Them - 445 words
    Kidneys, Who Needs Them? Kidneys, Who Needs Them? Kidneys perform many functions essential to the bodies functioning. The strain that is put on kidneys opens them up to many problems that can occur. Childhood sicknesses can result in failure of the kidneys to perform dialysis in later years of a person's life. Also, excessive minerals in the blood stream can cause kidney stones, which are very painful. Kidneys perform the basic functions of removing water and waste from the bloodstream, this process is called dialysis. After removing the water and waste from the bloodstream, it excretes them through the urine. The kidney's jobs never ends, whenever you take a drink of water or take a bite of ...
    Related: health care, machine, passing, removing
  • Membrane Physiology - 1,217 words
    Membrane Physiology Introduction The cell membrane is a fluid structure that is made up of phospholipids and proteins. Its main function is to allow osmosis and diffusion to occur in a cell. It protects a cell from taking in molecules that are too large and other chemicals that are not permeable without energy being used. The cell membrane is considered to be selectively permeable because it does not allow the non-fat soluble chemicals and the larger molecules in, but it does allow fat soluble chemicals and small molecules to pass into the cell. In order for the larger molecules and non-fat chemicals to enter the cell protein channels and energy are needed. In this lab you will see the cell ...
    Related: membrane, physiology, different levels, methods used, healthy
  • Morality And Practicality Of Euthanasia - 1,251 words
    ... period of suffering can be extended beyond the limit of human endurance. What's the point of allowing someone a few more months or days or hours of so-called life when death is inevitable? There's no point. In fact, it's downright inhumane. When someone under such conditions asks to be allowed to die, it's far more humane to honor that request than to deny it. (Lodle) There is no way we are going to come to grips with this problem until we also look at some of these areas that aren't going to go away . One of the toughest of these is what Victor Fuchs called flat-of-the-curve medicine- those medical procedures which are the highest in cost but achieve little or no improvement in health ...
    Related: euthanasia, morality, voluntary euthanasia, experimental procedure, health education
  • Organ Donation - 1,072 words
    Organ Donation INTRODUCTION /ATTENTION STEP A. 1. Imagine that a loved one has just been severely injured in a car accident. 2. The injuries include brain trauma, broken bones, but most notably, a loss of two pints of blood, that your friend is in desperate need of. 3. Coincidentally your blood type matches. 4. Picture yourself at the scene of the accident. 5. Put yourself in the hospital waiting room, anticipating news from the doctors, hoping that your friend will survive. 6. What would you say when the doctor approaches you and tells you that in order to save your friends life, you must donate. B 1. Now hold that thought with one more element added. 2. You were in the car, however you wer ...
    Related: donation, organ, organ donation, organ donor, organ transplant, organ transplantation
  • Plant And Animal Cells - 1,505 words
    Plant and Animal Cells subject = Honors Biology title = PLant and Animal Cells Plant and Animal Cells I. Introduction All organisms in life are composed of at least one or more cells. Cells are the basic units of life. There are three main features of a cell. First, all organisms consist of one or more cells. Second, cells are the smallest units of life and third, cells arise only from preexisting cells. These three facts are referred to as the cell theory. All cells can be categorized into two basic cell types. They are prokaryotic and eukaryotic. To distinguish where cells are placed in the two categories, what is inside the cell must first be looked at. Every cell, either prokaryotic or e ...
    Related: animal cells, eukaryotic cells, plant, over time, categories
  • Silicon - 1,220 words
    Silicon Silicon is an essential element in humans, found in significant concentrations in hair, bone, epidermis and dental enamel. It is also the second most abundant element on the earths crust, constituting about 28% by weight.(cite) Many foods and beverages, including certain vegetables, grains, rice, and beer have been shown to contain significant amounts of silicon. Silicone is a synthetic form of silicon and includes 40% silicon by weight. The silicones are synthetic polymers and are not therefore found naturally. They have a linear, repeating silicon-oxygen backbone akin to silica. However, organic groups attached directly to the silicon atoms by carbon-silicon bonds prevent formation ...
    Related: silicon, real life, reconstructive surgery, radiation therapy, breast
  • The Greatest Scientific Fraud - 1,538 words
    The Greatest Scientific Fraud Miriah Killam Writing 122 David Rothgery October 12, 2000 The Greatest Case of Scientific Fraud I have been told I have a beautiful smile, and I once thought it was true. It is big and quick, the kind that flashes across a whole face to reveal pearly whites. The sad truth is, I have become slower to show my Colgate smile as I have watched the most important part of a smile, my teeth, become less and less dazzling. For years I couldn't understand; I brushed twice a day, flossed once a week, stayed away from staining beverages, and I didn't smoke. My dentist attributed my brittle teeth to the fact that I have some Native American heritage, and they are known to ha ...
    Related: fraud, more prone, last year, alcohol consumption, radiation
  • The Role Of B Vitamins - 1,799 words
    The Role Of B Vitamins Water-soluble vitamins were collectively called water soluble B in the beginning. When more water-soluble vitamins were discovered, they were referred to as B1, B2, B6, B12 and so on. Later when more vitamins were discovered in both the categories, they were referred as vitamins C, D, E and K. Now, most are known by a word that indicates either chemical nature or function. Some vitamins are synthesized in the body itself by intestinal micro-organisms. Antibiotics and sulfa drugs may destroy these organisms resulting in decreased vitamin synthesis. There are other bacteria which when present in the intestine utilize dietary vitamins for their own use thus causing vitami ...
    Related: vitamin deficiency, vitamins, breast feeding, birth defects, breast
  • The Stock Market, As Evidenced By The Events Of The Past Several Years, Is A Delicate Thing Uncertainties Regarding The Marke - 1,922 words
    The stock market, as evidenced by the events of the past several years, is a delicate thing. Uncertainties regarding the market abide with justification. Not many market participants foresaw the extent to which the world markets would be affected by the Asian financial crisis. The news of widespread financial failures in Southeast Asia and Japan hit the American, European, and Latin American markets with force, with net losses of 10%-50% and up of the total stock market value. Yet, within months many of the battered markets, especially the American markets, have rebounded to record highs. In the wake of President Clintons sex scandal and his recent impeachment, todays stock market investor i ...
    Related: stock, stock market, stock price, multiple sclerosis, cash flow
  • Y2k - 1,666 words
    Y2k This year, most of the world is preparing to celebrate the year 2000 and the coming of a new millennium. However, many businesses, manufacturers, banks and hospitals are quietly hoping for an uneventful new years transition. At midnight on December 31, many businesses will be anticipating what effects the millennium rollover will have on computer software and other equipment that contain a time sensitive chip called an embedded chip. Early computer programmers, in an effort to conserve limited memory space, programmed computers to read the year in only two digits. So computers read 15 as 1915, and 02 as 1902, and so on. Thus, when the year 2000 arrives, many computer programs might go fr ...
    Related: personal computer, president bill clinton, information officer, chief
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