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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: developmental psychology

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  • Adoption And Identity Formation - 994 words
    ... y, the adopted child must struggle with the competing and conflictual issues of good and bad parents, good and bad self, and separation from both adoptive parents and images of biological parents. If all adoptions were open, the adoptee would have the ability to know about the traits of each family. He would have an easier task of forming an identity for himself, rather than struggling with the issues of to whom he can relate. If the adolescent has some information about his birth parents, such as ethnicity, socioeconomic status, and religion, Horner and Rosenberg (1991) believe that the following can happen: From the bits of fact that they possess, adopted children develop and elaborate ...
    Related: adoption, formation, identity formation, life cycle, family life
  • Child Development - 623 words
    Child Development Chapter 9: Developmental Psychology I Teratogens are any medication, chemical, infectious disease or environmental factors that interfere with the normal development of a fetus that can result in a loss of pregnancy, birth defect, or a pregnancy complication. A wide variety of factors include: drugs, alcohol, and viruses. Through techniques of ultra sound and amniocentesis, one can determine the health of the fetus and determine whether terotagens have had any effect. Ultra sound involves directing high-pitched sound waves toward the fetus. A computer converts the waves into a sonogram (outline image of the fetus, uterus, placenta). Amniocentesis is the withdrawal and analy ...
    Related: child behavior, developmental psychology, infectious disease, physical punishment, monitor
  • Child Development Analysis - 1,017 words
    Child Development Analysis How to rev kids up to do what you ask," is the sample to be discussed. Discussion The author, Hoffman introduces two experts, the magazine's parenting columnist Lynn and clinical psychologist, Phelan, to advise two families, the Ashworths, father Nigel and his three young children, Ben, one, Georgia, age three, and Liam, age five; the second family consists of Angela, a single parent and her twelve year old daughter, Nina. Parent/child interactions in regards to learning and embedding lifeskills and routines are addressed. 1. The article does not introduce research findings or mention the role of research. Phelan and Lynn support two parenting skills, acknowledgeme ...
    Related: young children, experimental research, self esteem, adaptation, esteem
  • Childhood Education And Social Inequalities - 1,127 words
    ... g a mother. The parents who show this usually have children who speak less, have poorer cognitive and linguistic outcomes, are impulsive, aggressive, have social withdrawal, insecure attachments, and poor peer relationships. Maltreatment of children is another big risk-factor with significant bearing on the social class. Maltreatment is associated with aggression, and four times as many(about 20%) of maltreated children go on to become delinquent. The causes can be associated with biological psychological, and social bearings. There is no doubt that early maltreatment of children can affect their neurodevelopment as well as their behavior. If the parents have access to community resource ...
    Related: childhood development, childhood education, early childhood, social class, child behavior
  • Cognitive Dissonance - 1,077 words
    ... earch paper. Either myself and/or my friends would be active participants in the persuasion process. The basic premise of the cognitive-dissonance theory is that when two pieces of information do not follow each other we will experience some form of psychological tension, which we will attempt to reduce in some way. Often times, according to Leon Festinger, people attempt to reduce cognitive dissonance whenever possible (Gleitman, 1983, p.12). I noticed many times that my friends were very interested in the topic of quitting their habit, and some at times took the issue personally. When people are personally involved with an issue, much like the use of tobacco, they are much more attenti ...
    Related: cognitive, cognitive dissonance, dissonance, dissonance theory, developmental psychology
  • Coming Out Of Gay Men And Lesbians - 1,111 words
    ... sexual gratification from a partner of the same sex (Clark, 1997). This lifestyle is not considered the norm, society and family members usually frown it upon. They have also had to try and overcome hostility from family members when they refuse to accept their sexual orientation. It has become easier for them to keep their choices a secret and do not flaunt their preference in public or on their jobs in fear of being ridiculed. They feel that their private lives should be kept behind close doors. By not "coming out" they can keep their jobs, housing, dignity, and take advantage of rights given to all citizens in society. But many have chosen to fight back and demand equal rights and tr ...
    Related: lesbian women, ethical standards, spiritual experience, harcourt brace, resource
  • Forensic Psychology - 528 words
    Forensic Psychology Part I: The Job Forensic Psychology is the application of the science and profession of psychology to questions and issues relating to law and the legal system. The word forensic comes from the Latin word forensis, meaning of the forum, where the law courts of ancient Rome were held. Today forensic refers to the application of scientific principles and practices to the adversary process where specially knowledgeable scientists play a role. There are several types of Forensic Psychologists although most fall into three different categories, criminal investigation, courtroom experts, and/or correctional psychiatrists. I decided to focus on the criminal aspect since it inter ...
    Related: abnormal psychology, child psychology, developmental psychology, forensic, psychology, social psychology
  • Growing Up: All Locked Up - 1,158 words
    Growing Up: All Locked Up Growing Up: All Locked Up A person's ability to develop is due to two factors, maturation and learning. Although maturation, or the biological development of genes, is important, it is the learning - the process through which we develop through our experiences, which make us who we are (Shaffer, 8). In pre-modern times, a child was not treated like they are today. The child was dressed like and worked along side adults, in hope that they would become them, yet more modern times the child's need to play and be treated differently than adults has become recognized. Along with these notions of pre-modern children and their developmental skills came the ideas of origina ...
    Related: born good, modern times, self-fulfilling prophecy, fundamental, crime
  • Jean Piaget - 1,182 words
    Jean Piaget This paper revolves around developmental psychologist Jean Piaget and his work. While swaying from the personal to the professional sides of the Swiss psychologist, the research touches on key influences that inspired young Piaget to become such a driven and well respected psychologist. However, the most extensive part of this paper is the explanation of his cognitive development theory and how it evolved. The three main pieces to Piaget`s puzzle of cognitive development that are discussed are schemes, assimilation and accommodation, and the stages of cognitive growth. In addition to the material on the man and his theory, there is the most important component of the paper, the w ...
    Related: jean, jean piaget, piaget, alfred binet, reference list
  • Once Upon A Psychological Theory - 2,118 words
    Once Upon A Psychological Theory Once Upon A Psychological Theory An Analysis of Psychological Hypotheses in Fairy Tales and Their Affect on Childhood Development INDEX I. Personal Statement II. Introduction III. Piaget A. Childhood Development i. Sensory-Motor Stage ii. Preoperational Stage ii. Stage Of Concrete Operations iii. Stage Of Formal Operations IV. Erikson A. Autonomy And Social Development i. Theory ii. The Goose Girl V. Freud A. The Id, The Ego And The Super Ego i. Theory ii. The Three Little Pigs B. Oedipus i. The Myth Of Oedipus ii. Theory ii. Snow White And The Seven Dwarfs iii. Cinderella iv. Rapunzel VI. Conclusion VII. Bibliography PERSONAL STATEMENT The object of psycholo ...
    Related: psychological, psychological development, psychological theory, stage theory, social development
  • Piaget V Erikson - 1,528 words
    Piaget V Erikson dolescence is considered a difficult time of life and one in which a number of changes occur as the individual achieves a certain integration of different aspects of personality. One approach to the cognitive and emotional transitions made at different times of life is to consider how the changes in, say, adolescence are linked to a continuum of change beginning in childhood and continuing throughout life. Some theorists, such as Piaget, were interested primarily in the transitions of childhood and youth, while others, such as Erikson, saw all of life as a series of transitions and offered a continuum of stages covering all of life. Piaget became fascinated in his early stud ...
    Related: erikson, jean piaget, piaget, developmental stages, third stage
  • Pregnancy And Alcohol - 1,044 words
    Pregnancy And Alcohol January 1989 the results of a study conducted by Ann Pytkowicz Streissguth were published in the Journal of Developmental Psychology. The study investigated the relationship of maternal use of drugs, alcohol and/or cigarettes during pregnancy on the IQ of her child at the age of four years. Newsweek and Scientific News also print articles later that year reporting the effects of maternal use of alcohol and drugs on the infant. They also looked at the effects of cigarette smoke on the fetus. Although the articles dealt with the same topic using information reported in the original study they differed in how they presented that information to their readers. All three publ ...
    Related: alcohol, alcohol and drugs, alcohol problems, alcohol syndrome, drugs & alcohol, fetal alcohol, fetal alcohol syndrome
  • Proposed Study To Determine The Effects Of Heat On Immediate Recall Of Videotaped Lecture In College Students, Age 18 25 - 1,776 words
    Proposed Study To Determine The Effects Of Heat On Immediate Recall Of Videotaped Lecture In College Students, Age 18 - 25 Proposed Study to Determine the Effects of Heat on Immediate Recall of Videotaped Lecture in College Students, Age 18 - 25 Dana Serrata The University of Texas at Brownsville and Texas Southmost College PSYC 3301.01 December 3, 1996 Dr. D. Freeberg Proposed Study to Determine the Effects of Heat on Immediate Recall of Videotaped Lecture in College Students, Age 18 - 25 Researchers have studied many aspects of temperature effects on human perception and cognition. Thermal stress, in the form of extreme heat, has been studied by examining the human response under this envi ...
    Related: college students, heat, lecture, recall, scientific study, social effects
  • Sleep Patterns And Sleep Disruptions In Schoolaged Children - 830 words
    Sleep Patterns And Sleep Disruptions In School-Aged Children. The five journal articles I examined were all from a journal titled Developmental Psychology, May 2000. The first journal article that I observed was Sleep Patterns and Sleep Disruptions in School-Aged Children. This study assessed the sleep patterns, sleep disruptions, and sleepiness of school-age children. Sleep patterns of 140 children (72 boys and 68 girls; 2nd-, 4th-, and 6th-grade students) were evaluated with activity monitors (actigraphs). In addition, the children and their parents completed complementary sleep questionnaires and daily reports. The findings reflected significant age differences, indicating that older chil ...
    Related: preschool children, sleep patterns, developmental psychology, african american, friendship
  • Social Behavior - 1,138 words
    ... luential study which looked at sixty children every month for their first twelve months, and showed that reinforcement from feeding was not able to account for attachment of infants to some people. Findings showed that the infants formed multiple attachments with parents, grandparents and siblings, and also those who did actually took little or no care of the infants basic needs. Instead attachments were formed with individuals who were prepared to play, be responsible and interact socially with the child. Based on such studies, Bowlby's reasoning was that the biological need for security has resulted in infants possessing a number of attachment behaviours, e.g. crying, following proximi ...
    Related: social behavior, social environment, early years, lawrence erlbaum, categories
  • Story Telling - 1,261 words
    ... er for cognitive than for affective empathy. Storytelling produced a significant effect in cognitive anger over the three conditions (F (df 2,32) = 4.216, p * .05). Post hoc paired t-tests (alpha set at .017 according to Bonferroni procedure) revealed a significant increase in empathy scores from the baseline (M = 3.0588, SD = .5557) to the immediate test condition (M = 3.4706, SD = .5145, p * .017). The same test also revealed marginal significance in the change of mean scores from the story condition to the second baseline test (M = 3.1765, SD = .3930, p = .056). These results indicate that storytelling did increase the empathy expressed by participants. No significant changes in mean ...
    Related: story telling, highly effective, negative effect, preschool children, sadness
  • Violence On Children - 973 words
    ... that the viewing environment set up in experiments is artificial and cannot be generalised to real-world television experiences. This is an important point since, as already mentioned, according to the social learning theory a key determinant of the likelihood to model behaviour is the extent to which a child can identify with a particular model. This is supported by research illustrating an effect of realistically filmed violence on children`s levels of aggression and no effect when unrealistically filmed violence was viewed by children. (Noble, 1973). An explanation for performance of modelled aggression during laboratory experiments could be explained by experimental demands for imita ...
    Related: aggression in children, media violence, preschool children, television violence, violence
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