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  • Knowledge, Ability, And Skill - 1,682 words
    1. Demonstrates the necessary knowledge, ability, and skill for assessing the physical, emotional, and mental capabilities of concerned persons to carry out an intervention. 2. Demonstrates commitment to ABCI principle that the primary goal of intervention is to secure immediate help for the chemically dependent person first and foremost. 3. Demonstrates commitment to ABCIs principle that pre-intervention counseling sessions for concerned persons are short term an time limited and should not be prolonged to the extent that immediate help for the chemically dependent person is postponed. 4. Ensures that during the intervention statements by concerned person to the chemically dependent person ...
    Related: skill, family member, drug dependence, criminal justice, spouse
  • 12 Angry Men - 1,027 words
    12 Angry Men This essay will compare & contrast the protagonist/antagonist's relationship with each other and the other jurors in the play and in the movie versions of Reginald Rose's 12 Angry Men. There aren't any changes made to the key part of the story but yet the minor changes made in making the movie adaptation produce a different picture than what one imagines when reading the drama in the form of a play. First off, the settings in the movie are a great deal more fleshed out. In the play, the scene begins with the jurors regarding the judge's final statements concerning the case in the courtroom and then walking out into the jury room. In the movie, the audience is placed in the role ...
    Related: angry, major change, self satisfaction, the courtroom, vibrant
  • 5 Page Report On Buddhism - 1,433 words
    5 page report on buddhism To begin this report, I will relate the story of the Buddha. Once a king had a son, his wife dying during labor. The childs name was Siddartha (meaning all wishes fulfilled) Gautama. As the boy grew up, there was a hermit who lived near the castle who saw a shimmering about the castle grounds. Taking this as an omen, the hermit went to the castle. When he saw Siddartha, he foretold that if Siddartha stayed in the palace until he was an adult, he would be a great ruler. But if Siddartha were to leave the palace and go into the world before he was mature, he would become the Buddha and save us all. At first the king was delighted to hear this news. But gradually, he b ...
    Related: buddhism, eightfold path, right effort, western culture, difficulty
  • Absurdity And The Stranger - 615 words
    Absurdity And The Stranger Absurdity is defined as that which is contrary to reason; clearly untrue, unreasonable or ridiculous. It is often a topic in existentialist writings relating to life. This subject is prevalent in Camus The Stranger and The Myth of Sisyphus. Camus depicts absurdity bringing about happiness or indifference in each of these literary works. In The Myth of Sisyphus, it is made clear that Sisyphus is aware that his existence is absurd. He is sentenced to an eternity of rolling a boulder up a steep mountain only to let it roll back down when it reaches its peak. His tragedy lies in the fact that he is conscious of the extent of his own misery. He is the ultimate absurd; t ...
    Related: absurdity, stranger, death sentence, moral code, complain
  • Alfred Housman - 1,661 words
    Alfred Housman Alfred Edward Housman, a classical scholar and poet, was born in Fockbury in the county of Worcestershire, England on March 26, 1859. His poems are variations on the themes of mortality and the miseries of human condition (Magill 1411). Most of Housmans poems were written in the 1890s when he was under great psychological stress, which made the tone of his poems characteristically mournful and the mood dispirited (Magill 1411). "In the world of Housmans poetry, youth fades to dust, lovers are unfaithful, and death is the tranquil end of everything (Magill 1412)." Throughout his life, Housman faced many hardships. The loss of his mother at age 12 shattered his childhood and lef ...
    Related: alfred, housman, true meaning, common theme, imagery
  • All Quiet On The Western Front - 1,065 words
    All Quiet on the Western Front The remains of Paul Baumer's company had moved behind the German front lines for a short rest at the beginning of the novel. After Behm became Paul's first dead schoolmate, Paul viewed the older generation bitterly, particularly Kantorek, the teacher who convinced Paul and his classmates to join the military, feeling alone and betrayed in the world that they had left for him. Paul's generation felt empty and isolated from the rest of the world due to the fact that they had never truly established any part of themselves in civilian life. At boot camp, Himmelstoss abused Paul and his friends, yet the harassment only brought them closer together and developed a st ...
    Related: all quiet on the western front, quiet, mass murder, human beings, bias
  • All Quite On The Western Front - 795 words
    All Quite On The Western Front All Quiet on the Western Front shows the change in attitudes of the men before and during the war. This novel is able to portray the overwhelming effects and power war has to deteriorate the human spirit. Starting out leaving youre home and family pr d and ready to fight for you country, to ending up tired and scarred both physically and mentally beyond description. *At the beginning of the novel nationalist feelings are present through pride of Paul and the rest of the boys. However at the end of the war it is apparent how pointless war really is. *All Quiet on the Western Front is a novel that greatly helps in the understanding the effects war. The novel best ...
    Related: all quiet on the western front, human spirit, world war i, paul baumer, stuff
  • American Dream - 847 words
    American Dream America, our great country, is strong, powerful, and influential. Americans exemplify positive values, selflessness, hospitality, and the American way of life. The mighty oak tree that stands taller, bigger, and older than all others best represents this grand country. Each part of the tree illustrates a facet of our nation. Shapely emerald leaves covering the tree symbolize the values many Americans hold concerning themselves, others, and their nation. Leaves help the tree grow and flourish just as our value of caring for our neighbors help us to unite and become more successful as a whole. The beautiful shade and distinct shape of these leaves make the tree more attractive a ...
    Related: american, american dream, american life, american values, dream
  • American Dream: Comparecontrast Great Gatsby And Citizen Kane - 1,164 words
    ... possessions and felt more empty than she had before. Money doesn't meananything! You never give me anything you really care about! After enduring a shocking realization that what she thought wanted in life wasn't at all what she really wanted, she began to realize that the single thing she did want, she knew she couldn't have- not from Charles at least. Charles Foster Kane was seemingly capable of almost anything- except love, for he was never taught how to love. The one thing he loved- his parents (who made weak efforts to return love to their own son) abandoned The intangible bond that is crucial between a mother and her son was attempted by Charles, but was not returned by his mother. ...
    Related: american, american dream, charles foster kane, citizen, citizen kane, foster kane, gatsby
  • An Artists Life - 1,197 words
    An Artist's Life An Artist's Life Much of the art of the Renaissance was extremely religious in its nature. The paintings from this time are almost entirely scenes from the Bible including: the enunciation of the Virgin Mary, depictions of the infant Jesus Christ, the crucifixion of Christ, and numerous other examples of Christian iconography. One would imagine that virtuous, upstanding artists would have created such angelic works of art. The stunning displays of morality, as seen in the works of many Renaissance painters, are not always a reflection of the artists lifestyle. Two examples of artists whose paintings did not reflect their lifestyles were Michelangelo Merisi de Caravaggio and ...
    Related: artists, personal history, specific purpose, the bible, lifestyle
  • An Era Of Punk - 1,711 words
    ... harlton, Rock music, 208). Smith also had a new version of the song My Generation in which she shouted obscenities, making it clear to every one that her generation was new and angrier. Most of the Ramones songs did not last more than two minuets, but it was arguably the most exhilarating half-hour in rock and Roll. The Ramones very simple, fast high-energy music and monotone vocals became a prototype for much punk rock to follow (Charlton, Rock Music. 208). The Ramones were the first of the New York Bands to tour extensively, and their appearances in England in 1976 was later cited by many English punk bands as the original inspiration for that countrys do-it-yourself rock revolution. T ...
    Related: punk, punk rock, rock music, music styles, rebellion
  • Analysis Of Pearl In Hawthornes The Scarlet Letter - 1,246 words
    Analysis Of Pearl In Hawthorne's The Scarlet Letter Analysis of Pearl in Hawthorne's The Scarlet Letter One of the most significant writers of the romantic period in American literature was Nathaniel Hawthorne. Hawthorne wrote stories that opposed the ideas of Transcendentalism. Since he had ancestors of Puritan belief, Hawthorne wrote many stories about Puritan New England. His most famous story is the Scarlet Letter. This novel tells of the punishment of a woman, Hester Prynne, who committed adultery and gave birth to Pearl. A minister of Boston, Arthur Dimmesdale, had an affair with Hester while believing that her husband, Roger Chillingworth, had died. However, Chillingworth did not die ...
    Related: nathaniel hawthorne, pearl, scarlet, scarlet letter, the scarlet letter
  • Anorexia: A Problem We All Must Face - 1,569 words
    ... and mental health problems and their development usually have a number of different contributing and perpetuating factors, as stated by organizations around the world dedicated to eating disorders. These factors could be any, or a combination of physical, emotional or sexual trauma, cultural emphasis or preoccupation with body image ideals, peer influences, loss and grief, starvation, brain chemistry, purging behaviors, physiological effects of dieting, relationships, stress, coping styles. It is this list that is generally understood universally as the possible causes of all eating disorders, and they apply directly to anorexia. Society plays a role without a doubt, constant pressures s ...
    Related: anxiety disorder, third stage, body image, degradation, plain
  • Araby, James Joyce - 741 words
    Araby, James Joyce Comment on the narrative voice of the story. Why does the boy get disillusioned at the end of the story? Does the confrontation with the reality take place only at the end? At what moment in the story and in what details does he confront the actual? The narrative voice of Araby by James Joyce is the author taking on the role of a male whose name is never mentioned. From the description of the setting we learn that he lives with his aunt and uncle in a working class area of Dublin. In the beginning of the story we are led to believe that he is a boy, playing in the streets with his friends as children do The career of our play brought us through the dark muddy lanes . (Joyc ...
    Related: james joyce, joyce, mangan's sister, the girl, approaches
  • Art Of Living By Thoreau Walden - 1,858 words
    Art Of Living By Thoreau Walden Thoreaus Art of Living In Thoreaus Walden, he explores the art of living by presenting a dichotomy of sojourning in nature. The life of participating with nature considers living simply and wisely while cooperating with both its lowest and highest elements. Thoreau calls for a change in life by changing the conventional ideas of standard societal views and its participation with the torpor of the material mass. Throughout Walden, Thoreau delves into his surroundings, the very specifics of nature while trying to live the ideal life. Perhaps the main theme and overbearing concept that Thoreau wishes to convey to the reader both in the conclusion and throughout W ...
    Related: thoreau, walden, active life, main theme, rituals
  • Asteroids - 1,203 words
    Asteroids In our solar system today there are over 30 000 asteroids flying around in all directions colliding with other asteroids and planets not caring about the destruction they might convey. Our planet Earth is caught right in the middle of all of this action and is liable to entire extinction of any life forms on the planet if a large enough asteroid crosses its path. Any one single asteroid has the possibility to erase thousands of years of history and wipeout the human race as we know it. Asteroids are large or small chunks of rock and metal flying around space up to speeds of 80 000 km/h. These chunks were believed to have formed millions of years ago during the big bang. These rocks ...
    Related: asteroids, human race, solar system, planet earth, mankind
  • Astronomers - 1,780 words
    Astronomers Part One Brief Descriptions of the Following Astronomers: Walter Baade : Baade was a German-born American, whose work gave new estimates for the age and size of the universe. During the wartime, blackouts aided his observatons and allowed him to indentify and classify stars in a new and useful way, and led him to increase and improve Hubble's values for the size and age of the universe (to the great relief of geologists.) He also worked on supernovae and radiostars. Milton Humason : Humason was a colleague of Edwin Hubble's at Mt. Wilson and Palomar Mtn. who was instrumental in measuring faint galaxy spectra providing evidence for the expansion of the universe. Jan Oort : In 1927 ...
    Related: catholic church, isaac newton, solar system, holland, medieval
  • Auguste Rodin - 1,079 words
    Auguste Rodin Like some artists, Rodin was not an overnight success. Even though he was rejected numerous times from art schools because of his art style, he prevailed in the end. Rodin, like many artists, got their inspiration from other great and famous artists. In Rodin's case, his inspiration came from Michelangelo. In Rodin's more famous works, one can see the similarities between the two artists' artwork. Rodin's parents were not wealthy, therefore, he was not able to attend an art school of his choice. His father, however, did send him to Petite cole, "a training ground for commercial draftsman and practiciens--cutters and finishers of work in stone" (Hale 38). At the age of seventeen ...
    Related: auguste, rodin, beaux arts, famous works, salon
  • Aviationaerospace Psychology - 1,361 words
    Aviation/Aerospace Psychology Eastern Flight 401 What really happened! By For Aviation/Aerospace Psychology MAS 634 Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University Extended Campus Fort Rucker, Alabama Resident Center March 2000 The following National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) abstract indicates only one of the many reasons for the actual crash. Date: December 29, 1972 Type: Lockheed L-1011 Registration: N310EA Operator: Eastern Airlines Where: Miami, FL Report No. NTSB-AAR-73-14 Report Date: June 14, 1973 Pages: 45 An Eastern Air Lines Lockheed L-1011 crashed at 2342 eastern standard time, December 29, 1972, 18.7 miles west-northwest of Miami International Airport, Miami, Florida. The aircraft ...
    Related: psychology, international airport, health problems, miami florida, faulty
  • Bartleby By Milville - 1,083 words
    Bartleby By Milville Since he will not quit me, I must quit him. "Ah Bartleby, Ah Humanity." (Page 140, Herman Melville) This is the key to Bartleby, written by Herman Melville, for it indicates that Bartleby stands as a symbol for humanity. This in turn functions as a commentary on society and the working world, for Bartleby is a seemingly homeless, mentally disturbed scrivener who gives up on the prospect of living life. However, by doing so Bartleby is attempting to exercise his freewill, for he would "prefer not to" work. His relationship to the narrator is thus significant, for as he attempts to exercise his freewill he is breaking from the will of the narrator and the normal progressio ...
    Related: bartleby, working world, work force, herman melville, initiative
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