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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: despair

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  • Disillusionment Depression Despair These Are The Burning Emotions - 919 words
    Disillusionment. Depression. Despair. These are the burning emotions churning in young Hamlet's soul as he attempts to come to terms with his father's death and his mother's incestuous, illicit marriage. While Hamlet tries to pick up the pieces of his shattered idealism, he consciously embarks on a quest to seek the truth hidden in Elsinore; this, in stark contrast to Claudius' fervent attempts to obscure the truth of murder. Deception versus truth; illusion versus reality. In the play, Prince Hamlet is constantly having to differentiate amongst them. However, there is always an exception to the rule, and in this case, the exception lies in Act 2, Scene 2, where an "honest" conversation (san ...
    Related: burning, despair, disillusionment, figurative language, young hamlet
  • Ozymandias C Despair - 245 words
    Ozymandias C. Despair Ozymandias C. Despair changed from the feeling that the greatness statue would inspire despair in others through fear but it did the opposite, the passers by feel despair for the statue in it wrecked stat, it is situational irony. Hardness scale D. These lines are a description of a specific event between woman and her husband or lover. The specific event is a symbol for the entire relationship between the man and the woman. The man goes off and is irresponsible in this situation and in life and get's into trouble mostly because of drink, and then uses the woman to help him. He tries to smooth over his taking advantage of her by using words of praise but only tends to h ...
    Related: despair, smooth, lesson
  • 1984 - 1,144 words
    1984 1984, by George Orwell (Pen Name), is a dystopian (opposite of utopia, imperfect) novel that presents the reader with a sense of despair for the characters. George Orwell, whose actual name is Eric Arthur Blair, was born in Motihari, India, June 25, 1903and died in London, England, January 21,1950. He was a prominent author in the 1940s of two satires that attacked the idea of totalitarianism. The novels and essays and such written in the 1930s established him as an influential voice of the century. Orwells' parents were members of the Indian Civil Service; he went to college in London and after wards joined the imperial police. During his service, he wrote his first novel, Down and out ...
    Related: 1984, eric arthur blair, animal farm, lower class, shop
  • 1984 Vs Animal Farm - 1,278 words
    1984 Vs. Animal Farm 1984 vs. Animal Farm 1984, by George Orwell, is a very powerful drama which involves man and totalitarian society. It is a story of a lonely rebel whose only valuable is his mind and who later conspires with another in an attempt to separate from their increasingly dominant hate-infested society. In 1984, Orwell depicts the susceptibility of today's society and its possibility of becoming a realm of lies. In it, the masses live in constant fear, being monitored at all times. He also admonishes the fact that this society can be in store for us in the future. The main theme of 1984 is that without independent thought and freedom, corruption can and will transform decent or ...
    Related: 1984, animal farm, farm, main theme, leon trotsky
  • 5 Page Report On Buddhism - 1,433 words
    5 page report on buddhism To begin this report, I will relate the story of the Buddha. Once a king had a son, his wife dying during labor. The childs name was Siddartha (meaning all wishes fulfilled) Gautama. As the boy grew up, there was a hermit who lived near the castle who saw a shimmering about the castle grounds. Taking this as an omen, the hermit went to the castle. When he saw Siddartha, he foretold that if Siddartha stayed in the palace until he was an adult, he would be a great ruler. But if Siddartha were to leave the palace and go into the world before he was mature, he would become the Buddha and save us all. At first the king was delighted to hear this news. But gradually, he b ...
    Related: buddhism, eightfold path, right effort, western culture, difficulty
  • A Birth Of A Nation The Bicycle Thieves - 1,300 words
    A Birth Of A Nation - The Bicycle Thieves In that paper, I will try to compare two films which are A Birth of a Nation directed by D.W.Griffith and The Bicycle Thieves directed by De Sica. After giving the story of the films, I will try to explain their technical features and their similarities. A Birth of a Nation by D. W. Griffith Griffith can be seen as the first 'modern' director, his greatest achievements being the historical epics The Birth Of A Nation. When it was released, it was one of the longest films ever made, over three hours in length. The prologue depicts the introduction of slavery to America in the seventeenth century and the beginnings of the abolitionist movement. The maj ...
    Related: bicycle, thieves, civil rights, ku klux klan, sequence
  • A Night In The Rain - 438 words
    A Night In The Rain A Night In The Rain There he stood, in amazement, gazing at, what a few moments ago, had been his ticket to freedom. Then flash, in the blink of an eye, the world was turned upside down. When I finally got myself together I was laying about 20 feet from the wreckage. I stood up and in front of me lay tons of graceful carnage strung across the field like a satin sheet after a restless night. Fire was everywhere illuminating the night with its delicate destruction. I could see through its glow about four or five train cars flung off of the tracks in such a matter that to the unknowing it would have looked like they had been placed for a special scene. Yet this was not the c ...
    Related: rain, creative writing, shining, darkness
  • A Woeful Trapact 1 In Hamlet - 466 words
    A Woeful Trap...Act 1 In Hamlet A Woeful Trap Is he mad or sane? Or just mad in craft, yet punished with sore distractions. Perhaps Hamlet is the victim--as we all at some time feel to be--of the world's sane view of insane perplexities. He is the man at war within himself; a traveler with a passport into strange, twilight regions of the soul. Whether or not Hamlet's suffering, and then insanity, is caused by his relations or by his own melancholy, Hamlet's struggle embodies the essential inwardness of human suffering that all can relate to. The concrete manifestations of Hamlet's misery are closely related. Not only has his father died, also his uncle is the murderer, his mother marries the ...
    Related: hamlet, romantic love, true love, unstable, wouldn
  • Aa Rose For Emily By William Faulkner 18971962 Is On Page 56 Of Literature Reading Fiction, Poetry, Drama, And The Essay Seco - 1,125 words
    AA Rose for Emily@ by William Faulkner [1897-1962] is on page 56 of Literature Reading Fiction, Poetry, Drama, and the Essay. Second Edition. Robert DiYanni. Pace University, Pleasantville. McGraw-Hill Publishing Company. 81990, 1986 by McGraw-Hill, Inc. P 56 AWhen Miss Emily Grierson died, our whole town went to her funeral: the men through a sort of respectful affection for a fallen monument, the women mostly out of curiosity to see the inside of her house, which no one save an old manservant - a combined gardener and cook - had seen in at least ten years.@ Emily is a recluse and Faulkner uses dashes to set apart side comments. P 56 AIt was a big, squarish frame house that had once been wh ...
    Related: a rose for emily, emily, emily grierson, faulkner, literature, miss emily grierson, reading fiction
  • Abortion And Prolife - 1,826 words
    Abortion And Pro-Life November 14, 1979, with the temperature outside at fifteen degrees, a two pound baby girl was found in a field wrapped up in a wet, dirty, old shirt. The umbilical cord was still attached, and the baby had been aborted twelve weeks prematurely. With little chance of survival, the baby was taken to a medical center. The little girl survived surgery and other efforts to save her. The baby was later adopted by, Susan Morrison, one of the nurses who attended to her. The baby was named Christelle, and now she and her mother talk to thousands of people about abortion and the pro-life movement (Maffet 13-14). This is an example of one person who felt they had the right to kill ...
    Related: abortion, fourteenth amendment, drugs and alcohol, united nations, despair
  • Absurd - 1,338 words
    ... hinoceros, as being the Nazi influence, and Berenger, the main character, as an ordinary man in an extraordinary situation. The chaos of the early to mid-twentieth century influenced Ionesco's life and work's greatly. He struggled with the concept of the absurd and soon became the father of the theatre of the absurd. He led men such as Samuel Beckett and Jean Genet to a greater understanding of the absurd. Samuel Beckett was one of the greatest names of the theater of the absurd. He spent a lifetime of hardship and work to overcome the challenges of his low self-esteem and confidence. He grew up in Dublin, Ireland, in a prominent family. After college, he was employed as James Joyce's se ...
    Related: absurd, modern world, liberation organization, middle class, autobiographical
  • Abuse - 860 words
    Abuse Many people may never experience what it is like to be abused, or to feel hatred for a parent, but in Bastard Out Of Carolina, the reader gets to relive what it is like to be abused through the eyes of a child. This engrossing and wonderfully written story will open your eyes to the reality of child abuse. The story is told through the eyes of Ruth Anne Boatwright, a child brought into the world with an unknown father and a mother who struggled to bring her up properly in a situation bound for despair. This harrowing account will leave you speechless and flabbergasted. Bastard Out Of Carolina is bound to make an everlasting impression in the mind of its readers. Ruth Anne was born into ...
    Related: abuse, child abuse, south carolina, blue eyes, wouldn
  • Ache Of Marriage - 714 words
    Ache Of Marriage In "The Ache of Marriage," Denise Levertov attempts to explain the pain this marriage experiences. It is a pain that affects both emotional and physical states of being. Levertov describes the pain as if someone were reading her thoughts. Through Levertov's use of non-conventional form, the theme of the pain of marriage and overcoming that pain jumps from the page. The author divides the poem into two parts. On one hand, Levertov shows the difficulty in making a marriage last. She depicts how a marriage can ache and hurt. On the other hand, Levertov says that a blissful marriage as the ultimate goal. All the trial and tribulations a marriage endures prove to be worth it the ...
    Related: ache, ultimate goal, free verse, literary device, clever
  • Adult Illiteracy - 3,219 words
    ... atic, enemies of early, intensive teaching of phonics. Frank Smith and Kenneth Goodman are two of today's most influential proponents of the look and say or as they would term it, whole language philosophy of teaching reading. San Diego State University Professor Patrick Groff recently reviewed 43 reading texts, all published in the1980's and used by teachers' colleges in training reading teachers, to see if they included the findings of researchers that the code-emphasis or phonics approach to teaching reading should be used. He found that none of these books advocate phonics. In fact, only nine of these books inform teachers that there is current debate about if or when phonics should ...
    Related: adult, adult education, adult literacy, illiteracy, state university
  • Advances In Medicine - 1,318 words
    Advances In Medicine As the history of medicine has evolved, a number of trends and prevailing opinions have swept the profession. One of the most subtle, and yet most revealing results of these sweeping trends manifests itself by altering the tone in medical conversations and dialogues, often available to the non-medical person in the form of texts and literature. A relatively current example appears in the form of Perri Klass A Not Entirely Benign Procedure, a text dedicated to the experiences of the author at Harvard Medical School. Published in 1987, Klass work offers an interesting, if not shocking comparison to Philippe Pinels The Clinical Training of Doctors, an article published in 1 ...
    Related: medicine, modern medicine, personal perspective, patient care, enthusiasm
  • Alchemy - 1,850 words
    ... e of Hermetic theory and the consciousness in the alchemical mind that what might with success be applied to nature could also be applied to man with similar results. Says Mr. Waite, "The gold of the philosopher is not a metal, on the other hand, man is a being who possesses within himself the seeds of a perfection which he has never realized, and that he therefore corresponds to those metals which the Hermetic theory supposes to be capable of developing the latent possibilities in the subject man." At the same time, it must be admitted that the cryptic character of alchemical language was probably occasioned by a fear on the part of the alchemical mystic that he might lay himself open t ...
    Related: alchemy, first half, chemical analysis, modern science, appeal
  • Alighieri, Dante The Divine Comedy - 1,760 words
    Alighieri, Dante The Divine Comedy The Divine Comedy by Dante Alighieri (1265 - 1321) Type of Work: Allegorical religious poem Setting Hell, Purgatory and Paradise; A.D. 1300 Principal Characters Dante, the Pilgrim Virgil, the Poet, and Dante's guide Beatrice, Dante's womanly ideal and religious inspiration Story Overview Prologue: Dante, realizing he has strayed from the "true way,. into worldliness, tells of a vision where he travels through all the levels of Hell, up the mount of Purgatory, and finally through the realms of Paradise, where he is allowed a brief glimpse of God. The traveler sets out on the night before Good Friday, and finds himself in the middle of a dark wood. There he e ...
    Related: comedy, dante, dante alighieri, divine, divine comedy
  • All Quiet On The Western Front - 598 words
    All Quiet On The Western Front All Quiet On The Western Front War is often perceived as glamorous and an adventure. However, war destroys many people in many ways. No one should ever have to experience the things that one does during the time of war. War is senseless and no one truly wins. In the novel, All Quiet On The Western Front, written by Erich Ramarque, he tells about the vivid horror and raw nature of war and to change the popular belief that war is an idealistic and romantic character. It is about men who even though they may have escaped shells, were destroyed by the war. The major themes of the book are friendship, alienation and futility. One of the important theme in Remarque' ...
    Related: all quiet on the western front, quiet, good food, major themes, innocence
  • American Indians - 929 words
    American Indians Indians in eastern North America possessed no alcohol at the beginning of the colonial period. By 1800, so much alcohol flowed through the Indian villages east of the Mississippi that each community were forced to decide to take it or not and they made a tragic choice by taking it because it destroyed their cultural. The Indians who drank did so to the point of intoxication enjoyed the experience they got from it. If Indians chose to drink out of frustration and despair, they were not alone; as social scientists have made clear, whenever Western societies undergo periods of rapid transition, rates of drinking increase. Documentary evidence also suggests that some Indians enj ...
    Related: american, american indians, documentary evidence, southern states, transition
  • An Analysis Of White Butterfly - 1,452 words
    An Analysis of White Butterfly In all of his books, Walter Mosley captures the environment and personalities of African Americans throughout post WWII history. His first book A Devil in a Blue Dress was met with instant acclaim. In this book he introduced one of the most unique sleuths that the literary world had seen. This 20th century Sherlock's name is Easy Rawlins. In each Easy Rawlins mystery, Mosley brings out a certain aspect of his protagonist's life and uses it as a subplot. In his third mystery, White Butterfly, Mosley looks at the relationship between Easy and his wife, Regina. The story starts off with Easy enjoying a quiet Saturday afternoon with his family. He has two children, ...
    Related: butterfly, white woman, best friend, double life, liquor
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