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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: deserts

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  • Deserts - 357 words
    Deserts A desert is an area defined by it has less than 50 cm of precipitation annually. Not all deserts are dry and sandy.Most of the worlds deserts tend to lie between 20 degrees to 30 degrees north and south latitude. North Africa, south western North America, the Middle East, and Australia support the largest deserts, but there are smaller deserts in other regions. Overall deserts cover one fifth of the earths surface.Hot desert climates are hot and dry, with high temperatures, usually around the 45 degrees Celsius mark which inturn with the low rainfall makes life in the desert very hard to support. At night the temperature can drop to around 18 degrees Celsius. With the hot deserts hig ...
    Related: deserts, north africa, south western, surface area, evaporation
  • A Battle For Adulthood - 410 words
    A Battle for Adulthood Throughout the novel The Red Badge of Courage, written by Stephen Crane, a theme is portrayed within a battle that takes place during the Civil War. It is that each person must find the courage to win his or her won battle for maturity or adulthood. A soldier, who is also the main character, Henry Fleming, exemplifies this theme. Henry Fleming begins as an immature soldier who enlists in the army without knowing a reason why. Henry has a romantic view of the war, and expects it to be glorious: "They [battles] might not be distinctly Homeric, but there seemed to be much glory in them. He [Henry] had read of marches, sieges, conflicts, and he had longed to see it all." H ...
    Related: adulthood, main character, red badge of courage, civil war, army
  • A Call To Arms Style And Tone - 525 words
    A Call to Arms - Style and Tone A Call to Arms - Style and Tone "After a while I went out and left the hospital and walked back to the hotel in the rain" (332). This last line of the novel gives an understanding of Ernest Hemingway's style and tone. The overall tone of the book is much different than that of The Sun Also Rises. The characters in the book are propelled by outside forces, in this case WWI, where the characters in The Sun Also Rises seemed to have no direction. Frederick's actions are determined by his position until he deserts the army. Floating down the river with barely a hold on a piece of wood his life, he abandons everything except Catherine and lets the river take him to ...
    Related: a farewell to arms, farewell to arms, tone, stream of consciousness, love story
  • A Farewell To Arms - 803 words
    A Farewell To Arms Love is impossible to explain or fully understand; it is enfable and war is merely an outcome of disputes between ignorant aristocrats. A Farewell to Arms, by Ernest Hemingway, is a novel about love and war. The narrator, Fredrick Henry is a war-time ambulance driver, and Catherine Barkley is an English nurse, who find themselves in a love affair which must maneuver itself around the restrictions of World War I. The novel begins in Gorizia, Italy the center of operations for Fredricks troop, World War I. Fredrick is an American volunteer and in the Ambulance Corps for the Italian Army. He meets a English nurse Catherine named Barkley and does not truly fall in love with he ...
    Related: a farewell to arms, farewell, farewell to arms, world war i, the narrator
  • A Farewell To Arms A Love Story - 1,085 words
    A Farewell to Arms - A Love Story A Farewell to Arms, by Ernest Hemingway, is a typical love story. A Romeo and his Juliet placed against the odds. In this novel, Romeo is Frederick Henry and Juliet is Catherine Barkley. Their love affair must survive the obstacles of World War I. The background of war-torn Italy adds to the tragedy of the love story. The war affects the emotions and values of each character. The love between Catherine and Frederick must outlast long separations, life-threatening war-time situations, and the uncertainty of each other's whereabouts or condition. This novel is a beautiful love story of two people who need each other in a period of upheaval. Frederick Henry is ...
    Related: a farewell to arms, farewell, farewell to arms, love affair, love story
  • A Lovely Rose In The Poem Song By Edmund Waller - 980 words
    A Lovely Rose In The Poem Song By Edmund Waller For many centuries, young men have been telling their sweethearts about ephemeral youth and passion which, like a candle, burns brightly but dies out slowly but surely. Edmund Waller's persona in the poem Song is such a young man. He sends a rose to his beloved to Tell her that [she] wastes her time and [him] (2) by acting shy and staying out of sight. This young lover is trying to tell his paramour that their time is too short for such petty things. He is telling her to forget society and let her feelings lead the way. The speaker of this poem wants his mistress to understand this eagerness of his, and drop everything and come running to enjoy ...
    Related: edmund, lovely, poem, poem song, song, waller
  • A Rose For Emily - 1,415 words
    A ROSE FOR EMILY A Rose for Emily takes place after the Civil War and into the 1900s in the town of Jefferson, Mississippia town very similar to the one in which William Faulkner spent most of his life. It is a story of the conflict between the old and the new South, the past and the presentwith Emily and the things around her steadfastly representing the dying old traditions and the present expressed mostly through the words of the narrator but also through Homer Barron and the new board of aldermen. The issue of racism also runs throughout the story. In part I, Faulkner refers to Emily as a "fallen monument", a monument to the southern gentility that existed before the Civil War. Her house ...
    Related: a rose for emily, emily, poor emily, rose for emily, colonel sartoris
  • Africa - 584 words
    Africa Africa is the world's second-largest continent, the biggest after Asia. It is more than three times the size of the U. States. It also contains more independent nations than any other continent on Earth-55 in all. Africa is centrally located on the Earth's surface. It straddles the Equator, extending for thousands of miles north and sough of that line. The continent stands between two major oceans. To the west is the Atlantic Ocean and to the east lies the Indian Ocean. The Mediterranean Sea in the north and the Red Sea in the northeast also border Africa. I have 10 different opion on the most common stereotypes about Africa. For the Climate of Africa they said it is hot and dry, for ...
    Related: africa, east africa, southern africa, mediterranean sea, indian ocean
  • Against Still Life - 1,239 words
    Against Still Life In the poem Against Still Life, poet Margaret Atwood fascinates us by weaving her words into descriptive feelings we can all relate too, especially women. Atwood is a well known poet and novelist who has a certain way of grabbing the attention of the reader and throwing the readers thoughts around without her even realizing it. In Against Still Life for example, Atwood opens her poem with an orange, nothing more than an orange. By the end of the poem she has got the reader pondering what men think about. It is assumed that Atwood is the speaker of the poem and the setting is simply a situation most of us can find ourselves in often. The speaker of the poem is Margaret Atwo ...
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  • American Indian Wars - 1,568 words
    American Indian Wars American Indian Wars There is perhaps a tendency to view the record of the military in terms of conflict, that may be why the U.S. Armys operational experience in the quarter century following the Civil War became known as the Indian wars. Previous struggles with the Indian, dating back to colonial times, had been limited. There was a period where the Indian could withdraw or be pushed into vast reaches of uninhabited and as yet unwanted territory in the west. By 1865 the safety valve was fast disappearing. As the Civil War was closed, white Americans in greater numbers and with greater energy than before resumed the quest for land, gold, commerce, and adventure that had ...
    Related: american, american west, civil war, indian, indian affairs, indian wars
  • Ancient Egypt - 1,006 words
    Ancient Egypt The civilization of ancient Egypt is significant in several ways. Egyptian influence on other peoples was also significant. Ancient kingdoms of the Sudan adapted its HIEROGLYPHIC writing system and other cultural elements. The two last regions and the Bible are the most important antecedents of the modern western world that owe something to Egypt. The western alphabet is derived from a Phoenician one possibly modeled on Egyptian hieroglyphs; Egyptian ideas are found in some parts of the Bible; and Greek sciences and especially, art were originally influenced by Egypt. Finally, archaeology and historical writing have made Egypt a subject of great public interest, stimulating man ...
    Related: ancient egypt, egypt, modern western, western world, universe
  • Angola - 1,638 words
    Angola Angola, formerly Portuguese West Africa, is the seventh largest country in Africa. The country can be divided into three major regions: the coastal plain, a transition zone, and the vast inland plateau. Angola has a tropical climate with its vegetation including tropical rain forests, savannas, grasslands, palm trees and even deserts. A great variety of animal life ranging from elephants, rhinoceros, giraffes, and even crocodiles can also be found in this African country (Microsoft 1). Very little is known about the early regions of Angola. The original inhabitants of present-day Angola were hunters and gatherers. Their descendants, called Bushman by the Europeans, still inhabit porti ...
    Related: angola, party system, liberation movement, foreign aid, profit
  • Anselm Of Canterbury - 1,044 words
    Anselm Of Canterbury Anselm concludes that one requires two wills to be free by arguing that to be free is to have an ability. In this paper I will argue that Anselm believes that this ability is incompatible with an Aristotelian doctrine of the will and that to have this ability, we must have at least two wills. Only in such a model is one free. Then I will argue that the agent who abandons justice differs from the one-willed creature Anselm considers in chapter 13,because the latter is not acting freely, whereas the former is acting freely. In the 3rd meditation of Meditations on First Philosophy, Descartes thinks he has proved the existence of God. Given that God is good, and that he exis ...
    Related: anselm, canterbury, first philosophy, existence of god, doctrine
  • Anselm Of Canterbury - 1,051 words
    ... more merited grace from God because they remained standing while the others fell than because they preserved rationality, which they were unable to lose." The teacher seems the think that it is not appropriate that God give grace to the angels that did not fall if falling was not a possibility. If their uprightness was guaranteed then there was never a possibility that they could fall, which would imply that the good angels took no part in their remaining upright. Yet it seems unwarranted, in this case, that God should give them grace. To deserve Gods grace, it must be the case that the angels chose to remain upright, which entails that they are upright because of their own ability. So ...
    Related: anselm, canterbury, right thing, free will, freely
  • Armenians - 568 words
    Armenians Through my research, of the websites and book listed in the works cited section of my paper, I have found that the Young Turks have been an important part of Turkish and Armenian history. The young Turks were a coalition of reform groups that led a revolutionary movement against the Ottoman Empires Sultan Abdulhamid the Second. They opposed him because of the absolute power he had, and because they wanted to eliminate foreign influence, and to restore Turkish pride. The Young Turks movement was started in the Imperial Medical college of Istanbul. In Istanbul it spread to other colleges including the military institutes. When Abdulhamid the Second, the Sultan of the Ottoman Empire, ...
    Related: armenian genocide, minority groups, central government, political power, centralized
  • Armor Of Ancient Rome - 1,908 words
    ... and relieving the shoulders of part of their burden. Moreover, tests using contemporary arrow types by Massey suggests that most arrowhead types consistently penetrated the mail to a depth that would prove lethal to the wearer. However, bunching of the mail at suspension points prevented penetration of the mail beyond a depth of 3-5 cm. This [implies] that the doubling of mail shoulder defenses known to be practiced by both Romans and Celts may have saved the life of their owners." These observations are consistent with Plutarch's writings of the life of Marcus Licinius Crassus who in 53 B.C. engaged the Parthians with his army in the deserts of Mesopotamia at the Battle of Carrhae. Plut ...
    Related: ancient rome, armor, imperial rome, rome, roman army
  • Australia - 1,086 words
    Australia Australia has changed hands a lot throughout its history. From being inhabited by the aborigines, which had been there for around forty thousand years, until the British claimed it. However the British were not the first to come across this continent, they were just the first countries to see it as useful. The Dutch were seeking new land and trade in the East Indies, and found that sailing along the coasts of Africa and India too much longer than if the went due east and the cut up. However, the Dutch Vessel, Duyfken, first sighted the coast of modern day Australia in 1606 when it did not turn north in time. In 1642-43 Able Tasman was looking for new land south of Batavia, and shif ...
    Related: australia, chelsea house, national geographic, geographic society, phillip
  • Australia - 427 words
    Australia Australia is an island continent and is located southeast of Asia. Australia is the smallest continent in the world. Australia is made up of six states . The climate in Australia varies greatly: a hot season, wet season with rains falling mainly in February and March. During which north western has warm and dry season. Australians mineral resources are notably bauxite, coal, gold, iron, ore, and petroleum. The most popular and native mammals in Australia are marsupials. The best known marsupials in Australia is a kangaroo which include fifty species. In Australia forty-three percent of surface consists of desert and sandy plains. Most of the population of Australia is of European d ...
    Related: australia, opera house, great barrier reef, world war ii, olympics
  • Australian Aborigines - 1,383 words
    Australian Aborigines Until this paper, I never even knew there was such a word as "Aborigine" let alone it being a race of people dating back to the prehistoric times. I thought that all Australians were of Anglo decent, but I was wrong about that assumption. The Aborigines were the first and only inhabitants of Australia, until the late 18th century when European settlers came. Because of the Europeans, the Aborigines lives would change drastically. In this paper, I am going to talk about the Aborigines, describing their origins up to the present. The Aborigines came originally from somewhere in Asia and have been in Australia for at least 40,000 years. The first settlement occurred during ...
    Related: aborigines, australian, australian aborigines, living conditions, daily life
  • Bahrain - 1,610 words
    Bahrain Table of Contents Section Page History 3 Cultural and Societal 5 Education 10 Business Climate 12 Government and Military 16 OVERVIEW OF BAHRAIN History of Bahrain Bahrain was once part of the ancient civilization of Dilmun and served as an important link in trade routes between Sumeria and the Indus Valley as much as 5000 years ago. Since the late 18th century Bahrain has been governed by the Al-Khalifa family, which created close ties to Britain by signing the General Treaty of Peace in 1820. A binding treaty of protection, known as the Perpetual Truce of Peace and Friendship, was concluded in 1861 and further revised in 1892 and 1951. This treaty was similar to those entered into ...
    Related: bahrain, world war ii, medieval europe, different ways, sixth
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