Live chat

Research paper topics, free example research papers

Free research papers and essays on topics related to: allen ginsberg

  • 17 results found, view research papers on page:
  • 1
  • Howl And Kaddish By Allen Ginsberg - 1,256 words
    Howl And Kaddish By Allen Ginsberg As you read the first lines of "Howl" and "Kaddish", the overall tone of the poem hits you right in the face. Allen Ginsberg, the poet, presents these two poems as complaints and injustices. He justifies these complaints in the pages that follow. Ginsberg also uses several literary techniques in these works to enhance the images for the reader. His own life experiences are mentioned in the poems, the majority of his works being somewhat biographical. It is said that Allen Ginsberg was ahead of his time, but in fact he was just riding the wave of a literature revolution. The decade of the 1950s was a time of change. America and the world was experiencing a t ...
    Related: allen, allen ginsberg, ginsberg, howl, staten island
  • Howl And Kaddish By Allen Ginsberg - 1,241 words
    ... in "Howl", and in the last part is the use of repetition. "It is Biblical in its repetitive grammatical buildup. It is a howl against everything in our mechanistic civilization which kills the spirit, assuming that the louder and more often you shout the more likely you are to be heard" (Eberhart, Page 25) The repetition of who and with in the first part, Moloch in the second and Im with you in Rockland in the third also give the impression that Ginsberg is impatient, he wants to be heard and he will repeat himself until his ideas get through to the public. Indeed, the ideas did get across, the poem was banned in several cities and states, including San Francisco, home of the Beatniks. A ...
    Related: allen, allen ginsberg, ginsberg, howl, michigan press
  • Allen Ginsbergs Poetry - 1,698 words
    Allen Ginsberg's Poetry Themes and Values of the Beat Generation As Expressed in Allen Ginsberg's Poetry Perhaps one of the most well known authors of the Beat Generation is a man we call Allen Ginsberg, who expresses the themes and values in his poetry. He was, in fact, the first Beat Writer to gain popular notice when he delivered a performance of his now famous poem, Howl, in October of 1955. The Beat Generation is typically described as a vision, not an idea and being hard to define. It is characterized as a cultural revolution in process, made by a post-World War II generation of disaffiliated young people...without spiritual values they could honor (Char ...
    Related: allen, allen ginsberg, poetry, post world, vietnam war
  • Atomic - 2,186 words
    ... re were no smells. There was no movement. Every step I took made a gravelly squeak in blue-white frost. And every squeak was echoed loudly. The season of locking was over. The Earth was locked up tight (179).This description eerily resembles what many have said the Earth will look like during a nuclear winter (Stone, 62). In addition to Dr. Hoenikker and his doomsday games, Vonnegut provides an interesting analysis of atomic age society with the Bokonon religion. This religion, completely made up by Vonnegut and used in this novel, is the religion of every single inhabitant of San Lorenzo, the books imaginary banana republic. This is the island where Jonah eventually ends up, and where t ...
    Related: atomic, atomic bomb, collected poems, nuclear waste, ripper
  • Beat Poets - 696 words
    Beat Poets The Beat Movement in modern literature has become an important period in the history of literature and society in America. Incorporating influences such as jazz, art, literature, philosophy and religion, the beat writers created a new and prophetic vision of modern life and changed the way a generation of people sees the world. That generation is mow aging and its representative voices are becoming lost to eternity, but the message is alive and well. The Beats have forever altered the nature of American consciousness. The Beat Generation of writers offered the world a new attitude. They brought to society a consciousness of life worth living. They offered a method of escape from t ...
    Related: beat, beat generation, poets, corporate world, pop music
  • Jack Kerouac - 1,303 words
    Jack Kerouac Jack Kerouac was a poet who focused on the forgotten people of the world. Wherever he traveled he found the places nobody wanted to find and turned the un-pretty into magnificent poetry. Kerouac used the people no one wanted to remember and turned them into poetic works of art. Jack Kerouacs life was filled with adventure and self-destruction. Born on March 12, 1922, Kerouac grew up in the poor city of Lowell, Massachusetts. His life was tormented with poverty and alcoholism, first by his father, then he himself was afflicted by the deadly disease. At the age of 8, Kerouac lost his brother, Gerard to typhoid fever. Kerouac traveled hitchhike style across the country. In 1943, Ke ...
    Related: jack, jack kerouac, kerouac, football team, columbia university
  • Jack Kerouac And The Beat Movement - 1,084 words
    Jack Kerouac And The Beat Movement World War II marked a wide dividing line between the old and the new in American society and the nations literature(The World Book Encyclopedia 427) . When world War II ended there was a pent up desire that had been postponed due to the war. Post war America brought about a time when it seemed that every young man was doing the same thing, getting a job, settling down and starting a family. America was becoming a nation of consumers. One group that was against conforming to this dull American lifestyle was referred to as Beatniks. The Beats or Beatniks condemned middle class American life as morally bankrupt. They praised individualism as the highest human ...
    Related: beat, jack, jack kerouac, kerouac, american society
  • Jim Morrison - 1,723 words
    Jim Morrison " The Doors. There's the known. And there's the unknown. And what separates the two is the door, and that's what I want to be. Ahh wanna be th' door. . ." - Jim Morrison Jim Morrison is often thought of as a drunk musician. He is also portrayed to many as an addict and another 'doped up' rock star. These negative opinions project a large shadow on the many positive aspects of this great poet. Jim's music was influenced heavily by many famous authors. You must cast aside your ignorance and look behind the loud electric haze of the sixties music. You must wipe your eyes and look through the psychedelic world of LSD. Standing behind these minor flaws, you will see a young and very ...
    Related: morrison, alexander the great, coca cola, rolling stone, ucla
  • Langston Hughes: An Outsiders Voice Of The People - 1,101 words
    Langston Hughes: An Outsider's Voice Of The People Langston Hughes: An Outsider's Voice of the People Langston Hughes is often considered a voice of the African-American people and a prime example of the magnificence of the Harlem Renaissance. His writing does embody these titles, but the concept of Langston Hughes that portrays a black man's rise to poetic greatness from the depths of poverty and repression are largely exaggerated. America frequently confuses the ideas of segregation, suppression, and struggle associated with African-American history and imposes these ideas onto the stories of many black historical figures and artists. While many of them have struggled with these confines s ...
    Related: american people, black people, langston, langston hughes, outsiders
  • Rebel Poets Of 1950s - 1,826 words
    Rebel Poets Of 1950S Rebel Poets of the 1950s America demands a poetry that is bold, modern and all-surrounding and kosmical, as she is herself. Although Walt Whitman wrote that prescription shortly after the Civil War, it also vividly describes the generation of American poets who came of age after World War II. Particularly during moments of cultural change, poets have joined artists on the front lines of expanding consciousness by forging a vernacular language that gives expression to contemporary life. One such shift in poetry occurred at the time of World War I, and another major shift took place during the decade after the Second World War. The 1950s are stereotypically represented as ...
    Related: american poets, poets, rebel, urban life, natural environment
  • Rimbaud And Ginsberg - 866 words
    Rimbaud And Ginsberg Rimbaud and Ginsberg as Modern Poets Anyone who has read a fair sampling of modernist poetry or studied some representative visionary poets has found the experience something of a revelation. Immediately exhilarating for some, initially intimidating for others and, for all of us, a profound departure from traditional literature. According to Rimbaud, for a poet to be absolutely modern he must become a visionary and a poet makes himself a visionary through a long, boundless and systematized disorganization of all the senses. All forms of love, of suffering, of madness, he searches himself, he exhausts within himself all poisons and preserves their quintessences. Rimbauds ...
    Related: allen ginsberg, ginsberg, rimbaud, school library, high school
  • Sixties Counterculture: 10 Pg Proposal - 1,689 words
    ... nings of underground acid rock. Monterey along with Woodstock, which followed two years later, created a mythical society, as Abbie Hoffman would call it, a Woodstock nation. The Woodstock nation was a state of mind, an anarchy realizing itself in the act of anarchic rebellion. Shortly after Woodstock, Hoffmans dream was badly wounded if not destroyed by the Rolling Stones and the Hells Angels at Altamont. The Stones had hired the Hells Angels as security for the show, and from the start the vibes were bad. Gitlin recalls that the majority of the crowd was on acid and having bad trips. This along with the Angels fighting and shoving anyone who got to close to them or the stage caused a r ...
    Related: proposal, sixties, harcourt brace, university press, dorsey
  • The Watcher - 1,002 words
    The Watcher The Watcher Guy Vanderhaeghe This incredible short story is about a little boy named Charlie Bradley, who isnt like all the other kids his age. He was a very sick boy. Charlie had a loving mother who cared for him when he was sick. They seemed to have both one terrible thing in common, a bad chest. The Bradleys did not own a television set, so Charlie had to find different means of entertainment on his long sick days at home. He learned that if he kept quiet and still, the adults would have labeled him to be part of the furniture. On his days home, Charlie received glimpses into the adult world of common topics like misery and scandals. These relations and encounters with the adu ...
    Related: watcher, young boy, military officer, short story, soft
  • Timothy Leary - 983 words
    Timothy Leary "Turn on, tune in, drop out." That saying has turned into the slogan of Timothy Learys mind-expanding movement. Although a graduate of both West-Point and Berkley, and a Harvard professor, these were not his greatest lifetime achievements. Throughout his publicized life, he became the spokesperson of the psychedelic age. His devotion to the belief that LSD and marijuana were gateways to enlightenment resulted in a new church, numerous prison sentences, and a following of both celebrities and the general public. When people think of Timothy Leary their immediate response is "Turn on, tune in, drop out," his trademark line, although the meaning of it has often been misinterpreted ...
    Related: leary, timothy, timothy leary, oxford university press, nervous system
  • Whitman - 1,129 words
    Whitman Walt Whitman was looked upon as the forerunner of 20th Century poetry, praising democracy, and becoming a proclaimed poet of American democracy. He was known as the "Son of Long Island," and he loved his country and everything about it. (Current, Williams, Freidel- page 292-293). Whitman lived during the time of the Civil War; a fact that increased his patriotism. Whitman was considered one of the most important American Poets of the 19th Century. (Encyclopedia of World Biography- page 249). He influenced the direction of 20th Century poets such as Erza Pound, William Carlos Williams, Carlos Sandberg, and Allen Ginsberg. Whitman praised democracy and spoke of the flesh as well as the ...
    Related: walt whitman, whitman, abraham lincoln, school teacher, poet
  • Whitman - 1,126 words
    ... y became preoccupied with the soul, death, and immortality. He turned 45, shortly after the war. On his birthday, he wrote letters to soldiers he helped during the war. (Kaplan, Justin- page 323). He received many thank you letters from the soldiers and their families because of the great things he did for them. Whitman was devastated by the death of President Abraham Lincoln and his reflections and tribute to the "great leader" were found in the poems, "When Lilacs Last in the Dooryard Bloomd" and "OCaptain, My Captain." (Lowen, Nancy- pages 29-30). Whitman described Lincoln as the most "satisfactory thing I have ever seen, and I have seen hundreds of different ones." These poems showed ...
    Related: walt whitman, whitman, united states of america, continental united states, american
  • Zen Buddhism - 1,327 words
    Zen Buddhism Buddhism's trek through history, politics, and America Zen, or Zenno (as it is known by the Japanese word from which it derives), is the most common form of Buddhism practiced in the world today. All types of people from intellectuals to celebrities refer to themselves as Buddhist, but despite its popularity today in America, it has had a long history throughout the world. "Here none think of wealth or fame, All talk of right and wrong is quelled. In Autumn I rake the leaf-banked stream, In spring attend the nightingale. Who dares approach the lion's Mountain cave? Cold, robust, A Zen-person through and through, I let the spring breeze enter at the gate." -Daigu (1584-1669, Rinz ...
    Related: buddhism, zen buddhism, south vietnam, long history, neutrality
  • 17 results found, view research papers on page:
  • 1