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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: allegory of the cave

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  • Allegory Of The Cave - 1,260 words
    Allegory Of The Cave Allegory of the Cave In Books II and III of The Republic, Socrates sets the stage for a view of education for the warriors in the culture, asserting a need for the study of different disciplines, including art and athletics. Though this provides a sense of Plato's perspective on education, his outlining of educational premises in Book VII, including his view of rational though, education, and the responsibilities of both the student and the teacher in his Allegory of the Cave defines a call for a curriculum in education based on the directives and significance of the student, and can be asserted as the foundations of modern liberal arts educational philosophies. In order ...
    Related: allegory, allegory of the cave, cave, appropriate education, art philosophy
  • Allegory Of The Cave - 727 words
    Allegory Of The Cave The Allegory of the cave The Allegory of the Cave, like most things in philosophy, can be deciphered in many different ways. It basically says that people are chained to the wall of a cave and they have nothing to look at but shadows on the wall that are provided by another. This is all that they know and have never been out of the cave. That tells nothing on the surface, but once one looks really hard a few messages or meanings can be interpreted from the Allegory. The main point of the Allegory of the Cave is to give an example of the way that we all live our lives. Except for a chosen few like Christ, Gandhi and maybe even Socrates, no one is really enlighten, or has ...
    Related: allegory, allegory of the cave, cave, different ways, main point
  • Allegory Of The Cave And The Myth Of Sisyphus - 660 words
    Allegory Of The Cave And The Myth Of Sisyphus The Allegory of the Cave, written by Plato, is a parable entailing that humans are afraid of change and what they do not know. In this situation he gives, men are living in an underground cave. There is only one entrance and it is at the top. Near the entrance of the cave there is a fire burning which casts a shadow. The men living in the cave have been there their whole life. They are chained so that they can only see the wall and cannot turn around. When objects pass by it creates a shadow on the wall. The shadows are the only thing they can see and therefore is the only thing they know to exist. Somehow one of them gets loose and wonders outsi ...
    Related: allegory, allegory of the cave, cave, myth, myth of sisyphus, sisyphus
  • Plato The Allegory Of The Cave - 628 words
    Plato - The Allegory Of The Cave 1) Outline the Divided Line and tell the meaning of each division in terms of things that exist and the degree of truth that is possible at each level. Use this to explain the Allegory of the Cave. Platos Divided Line represents the visible (images and shadows) vs. the intelligible (searching for answers). These theme of the tangible truth vs. perceived truth can be found throughout the Allegory of the Cave. THOUGHT - Too many people, in todays society live their lives with blinders on and look at the world around them as if they were chained facing a wall. There is not enough interest in helping one another to see ways to make this a better world. Much of so ...
    Related: allegory, allegory of the cave, cave, plato, people believe
  • The Allegory Of The Cave - 1,035 words
    The Allegory Of The Cave The Allegory of the Cave, by Plato: Theory of Dimensions In Platos The Allegory of the Cave, allows an individual to realize that which they already know. The situation in the cave seems dark and gloomy, like a place no one would ever want to go. However, the reality is that some people are at a point in their lives where that is where they are, in their own cave. The people that are in Platos cave, the prisoners, have always been there. They all have their legs and necks chained and cannot move. They cannot turn their necks or bodies to look around them. The cave is very dark and there is a fire in the distance. There is a wall in front of them and men are frequentl ...
    Related: allegory, allegory of the cave, cave, ultimate good, major change
  • The Allegory Of The Cave - 457 words
    The Allegory of the Cave A report I had to do on Plato's Allegory of the Cave. Plato was born 427 B.C. and died 347 B.C. He was a pupil under Socrates. During his studies, Plato wrote the Dialogues, which are a collection of Socrates' teachings. One of the parables included in the Dialogues is "The Allegory of the Cave". "The Allegory..." symbolizes man's struggle to reach understanding and enlightenment. First of all, Plato believed that one can only learn through dialectic reasoning and open-mindedness. Humans had to travel from the visible realm of image-making and objects of sense to the intelligible or invisible realm of reasoning and understanding. "The Allegory of the Cave" symbolizes ...
    Related: allegory, allegory of the cave, cave, natural selection, galapagos islands
  • The Allegory Of The Cave Is A Dialogue On Nature, By The Very Influential Greek Philosopher Plato His Life Was Headed Toward - 439 words
    The Allegory of the Cave is a dialogue on nature, by the very influential Greek philosopher Plato. His life was headed toward politics until his mentor Socrates was executed. Plato then abandoned politics and turned to writing and teaching philosophy. I believe his philosophies play a more significant and meaningful role than materialism in our modern society. He believes that the world revealed by our senses is not the real world but only an illusion of true reality. The cave represents the system or government, in this cave lives prisoner chained like animal to the wall with no mobility and deprived of light. This allegory shows why the truth is so hard to accept and why once the prisoners ...
    Related: allegory, allegory of the cave, cave, dialogue, greek, greek philosopher, influential
  • Allegory Of Cave Not Essaylots Of Info - 2,868 words
    ... SS. HE COULD NOT UNDER THESE CIRCUMSTANCES COMPETE VERY EFFECTIVELY WITH THE OTHER PRISONERS IN MAKING OUT THE SHADOWS ON THE WALL. WHILE HIS EYESIGHT WAS STILL DIM AND UNSTEADY, THOSE WHO HAD THEIR PERMANENT RESIDENCE IN THE DARKNESS COULD WIN EVERY ROUND OF COMPETITION WITH HIM. THEY WOULD AT FIRST FIND THIS SITUATION VERY AMUSING AND WOULD TAUNT HIM BY SAYING THAT HIS SIGHT WAS PERFECTLY ALL RIGHT BEFORE HE WENT UP OUT OF THE CAVE AND THAT NOW HE HAS RETURNED WITH HIS SIGHT RUINED. THEIR CONCLUSION WOULD BE THAT IT IS NOT WORTH TRYING TO GO UP OUT OF THE CAVE. INDEED, SAYS PLATO IF THEY COULD LAY HANDS ON THE MAN WHO WAS TRYING TO SET THEM FREE AND LEAD THEM UP THEY WOULD KILL HIM. MO ...
    Related: allegory, allegory of the cave, cave, info, human beings
  • Dantes Inferno Use Of Allegory - 892 words
    Dante's Inferno - Use of Allegory Dante's use of allegory in the Inferno greatly varies from Plato's "Allegory of the Cave" in purpose, symbolism, characters and mentors, and in attitude toward the world. An analysis of each of these elements in both allegories will provide an interesting comparison. Dante uses allegory to relate the sinner's punishment to his sin, while Plato uses allegory to discuss ignorance and knowledge. Dante's Inferno describes the descent through Hell from the upper level of the opportunists to the most evil, the treacherous, on the lowest level. His allegorical poem describes a hierarchy of evil. Conversely, Plato's "Allegory of the Cave" describes the ascent from i ...
    Related: allegory, allegory of the cave, dante's inferno, dantes inferno, inferno
  • Epistemology Plato Vs Aristotle - 1,137 words
    Epistemology - Plato Vs Aristotle Epistemology Plato vs. Aristotle In Republic, Plato defines the ideal government to be one that is set up and run by a philosopher king. This person, having a completely just soul, would be able to organize and run a government that was also completely just. Aristotle also believes that this monarchy run by the perfect ruler that Plato describes would be ideal, if it were possible. However, Aristotle doesnt believe that a perfectly just person exists. On page 81 of The Politics Aristotle says that if such a perfectly just person did exist he would be a God among men, and there are no gods among men. So, Aristotle discounts the possibility of the existence of ...
    Related: aristotle, epistemology, knowledge plato, plato, greek civilization
  • Fahrenheit 451 - 989 words
    Fahrenheit 451 Light, especially fire, and darkness are significantly reoccurring themes in Fahrenheit 451. Guy Montag, the main character, is a fireman, but in this futuristic world the job description of a fireman is to start fires wherever books are found; instead of putting them out. Montag takes a journey from a literary darkness to a knowledgeable light. This journey can be compared to the short story Allegory of the Cave by Plato, in which a prisoner experiences a similar journey. An example of light, in reference to knowledge, occurs just after Montag meets Clarisse for the first time. "When they reached her house all its lights were blazing" (9). Since Montag had rarely seen that ma ...
    Related: fahrenheit, fahrenheit 451, platos allegory, captain beatty, futuristic
  • Philosophy In Search Of Absolute Beauty From Platos Symposium - 1,520 words
    Philosophy - In search of Absolute Beauty From Plato's Symposium Webster defines beauty as the quality or the aggregate of qualities in a person or thing that gives pleasure to the senses or pleasurably exalts the mind or spirit. Is this correct? Cannot one persons definition of beauty differ from another persons definition? One person may find beauty in something another person finds repulsive. When someone says a woman is beautiful and another person says that a type of music is beautiful are he or she talking about the same kind of beauty? Everyone has a different idea about what is beautiful, so how are we to know what true beauty is? If everyone has his or her own opinion about what is ...
    Related: absolute, philosophy, symposium, different aspects, real world
  • Plato And Forms - 1,257 words
    Plato And Forms Platos Forms The influence that Plato, the Greek philosopher born in 427 BC in Athens, has had throughout the history of philosophy has been monumental. Among other things, Plato is known for his exploration of the fundamental problems of natural science, political theory, metaphysics, theology and theory of knowledge; many of his ideas becoming permanent elements in Western thought. The basis of Plato's philosophy is his theory of Ideas, or doctrine of Forms. While the notion of Forms is essential to Plato's philosophy, over years of philosophical study, it has been difficult to understand what these Forms are supposed to be, and the purpose of their existence. When examinin ...
    Related: plato, allegory of the cave, greek philosopher, political theory, rarely
  • Plato And Patricia King - 1,179 words
    Plato And Patricia King 2000 years ago, Plato, one of the forefathers of Western civilization, materialized the foundational ideas on reflective thinking in the "Allegory of the Cave", which stemmed from the "Republic." In his essay, he symbolically shows the stages and value of reaching a higher level of thinking. Being able to reflectively think is so important, it is still being discussed in our modern times. In the essay "How do we know? Why do we Believe?", by Patricia King, the stages of thinking are outlined in order to help educators better teach critical thinking. She describes how people process information and arrive at conclusions. Her aspirations for the essay are to help people ...
    Related: patricia, plato, different stages, allegory of the cave, necessity
  • Plato Vs Descartes - 1,507 words
    Plato Vs. Descartes Descartes vs. Plato In the field of philosophy there can be numerous answers to a general question, depending on a particular philosopher's views on the subject. Often times an answer is left undetermined. In the broad sense of the word and also stated in the dictionary philosophy can be described as the pursuit of human knowledge and human values. There are many different people with many different theories of knowledge. Two of these people, also philosophers, in which this paper will go into depth about are Descartes and Plato. Descartes' Meditations on First Philosophy and Plato's The Republic are the topics that are going to be discussed in this paper. In Meditations, ...
    Related: descartes, descartes meditations, knowledge plato, plato, divided line
  • Platos Theory Of Knowledge - 1,197 words
    Plato`s Theory Of Knowledge Plato's Theory of Knowledge is very interesting. He expresses this theory with three approaches: his allegory of The Cave, his metaphor of the Divided Line and his doctrine The Forms. Each theory is interconnected; one could not be without the other. Here we will explore how one relates to the other. In The Cave, Plato describes a vision of shackled prisoners seated in a dark cave facing the wall. Chained also by their necks, the prisoners can only look forward and see only shadows, These shadows are produced by men, with shapes of objects or men, walking in front of a fire behind the prisoners. Plato states that for the prisoners, reality is only the mere shadows ...
    Related: knowledge plato, divided line, allegory of the cave, real world, outdoors
  • Poopsex - 1,943 words
    Poopsex The Divided Line (The Republic , Book VI) Socrates You have to imagine, then, that there are two ruling powers, and that one of them is set over the intellectual world, the other over the visible. I do not say heaven, lest you should fancy that I am playing upon the name. May I suppose that you have this distinction of the visible and intelligible fixed in your mind? Glaucon I have. Socrates Now take a line which has been cut into two unequal parts and divide each of them again in the same proportion, and suppose the two main divisions to answer, one to the visible and the other to the intelligible, and then compare the subdivisions in respect of their clearness and want of clearness ...
    Related: allegory of the cave, human beings, divided line, screen, resemblance
  • Religion, Philosophy, And Scientific Thinking - 1,148 words
    Religion, Philosophy, And Scientific Thinking During the seventeenth century, many philosophers formulated new ideas that would consequently change the beliefs of the common man. The "thinkers" of the Renaissance Period have the way 17th Century man to the current world. In short, the world viewed religion, philosophy, and science in a very different way by the end of the seventeenth century because of these great philosophers. In the early 1600's Blaise Pascal, originally from Clermont, played a dominant two areas of advanced thinking. His mathematical reputation rests more on what he might have done than on what he actually affected, a considerable part of his life he devoted wholly to rel ...
    Related: scientific evidence, scientific experimentation, scientific research, flat earth, renaissance period
  • The Matrix - 1,020 words
    The Matrix The Matrix In viewing the Matrix, a 1999 Warner Brothers/Village Roadshow Picture release, there are numerous references to philosophy portrayed in the movie. In analyzing the Matrix one will be able to see how Descartes Meditations on Methodic doubt, his Evil Genius Hypothesis, and Platos allegory of the cave are portrayed in this film. According to Descartes Meditation on methodic doubt he tries to achieve absolute certainty about the nature of everything. In order to acquire absolute certainty, Descartes must first lay a complete foundation of integrity on which to build up his knowledge. The technique that he uses to lay this foundation is doubt. Descartes starts by looking at ...
    Related: matrix, descartes meditations, real world, warner brothers, acquire
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