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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: democratic society

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  • A Practical Approach To Television Violence - 1,249 words
    ... rial previously rated or labeled by the television industry as to violent content.(H.R.2888 3) After decades probing the issue in one congressional committee after another, it is time to acknowledge, emphatically, that the simple choice is between censorship and responsible voluntary conduct. There is, on this topic, no middle ground. While the government can cajole the industry, even talk over the industry directly to the American public, it is ultimately the public that must decide whether to watch, protest against, or turn off particular violent programming. It cannot be legislated on a program, by, program basis. We face a far more diverse information and entertainment marketplace th ...
    Related: practical, television, television programs, television violence, violence, violence in the media, violence on television
  • Andrew Jackson - 1,162 words
    Andrew Jackson Guardians of Freedom? The first and truest ideals of democracy were embodied in the political ideas of Andrew Jackson and the Jacksonian democrats. Calling themselves the guardians of the United States Constitution, the Jacksonian politicians engendered wide spread liberty under a government which represented all men, rather than only the upper class. While some policies under the democrats had evident flaws, they were, for the most part, eager social reformers who strived to put the power of government into the hands of the common citizens. The convictions and ideals of the Jacksonian Democrats can be best illustrated through a passage written by George Henry Evans. Evans was ...
    Related: andrew, andrew jackson, jackson, president jackson, american history
  • Are We Democratic - 945 words
    Are We Democratic? National American Government April 20, 2000 In the first essay written by Howard Zinn he tries to answer the question of "How Democratic Is America?". He seems to know what he is talking a great deal about government but it seems like anybody can just talk about how our government works and to say that that is the definition of democracy. The only thing he did differently was using an increase in vocabulary and try to talk about the same thing over and over again. Where Zinn could have said that democracy not only requires formal system of government equality to all Americans. But Americans are not the only ones who deserve this kind of treatment. Everybody from all walks ...
    Related: democratic national, democratic society, howard zinn, american government, founding
  • Birth Of A Nation: The Suppression Of A People - 1,772 words
    Birth of a Nation: The Suppression of a People Birth of a Nation: The Suppression of a People America is believed to be founded as the first state founded on the notion that democracy is for all people, however this is far from the truth. Not only did it take almost two hundred years till the American government grants full opportunities to African American, they even accepted the slavery of these peoples for almost half of that time. A republic government, such as the American government, is based on the idea that all people can have an equal represented fairly and have an equal vote. This is very hard to accomplish when groups of people living within that republic are discriminated against ...
    Related: american people, colored people, suppression, point of view, new brunswick
  • Campus Unrest - 1,203 words
    Campus Unrest In response to great opposition to United States' involvement in the Vietnam War, the antiwar movement of the 1960s sprung forth. A vast majority of involvement in this movement was represented on college campuses across the nation. Many college students wholeheartedly believed that the war in Vietnam served no point. America was simply once again sticking its nose in business that was not our own. As a result of the war, universities nationwide in the sixties were in uproar as students attempted to express their opinions through both violent and nonviolent means. Anti-Vietnam protests were first displayed through teach-ins that took place during the fall and spring semesters ( ...
    Related: campus, college campus, unrest, new jersey, world today
  • Campus Unrest - 1,217 words
    ... was not what was best for the United States as it affected everyone in one way or another. Students were affected through their education, laborers in the steel mills were affected as the government prevented them from walking out on the job in order to maintain production, and the entire country was damaged as billions of dollars were removed from the national budget in order to fund the efforts overseas("What" 4-5). A turning point of the anti-war movement occurred in November of 1969. The New Mobilization to End the War, otherwise know as the "Mobe", proved to have a turnout of nearly a 500,000 people, the biggest crowd ever to gather in the United States in order to "ignite a politi ...
    Related: campus, unrest, state college, turning point, crowd
  • Censorship - 884 words
    Censorship CENSORSHIP Censorship and the ideology supporting it reiterates concepts from ancient times. In early Greek civilization, Socrates was accused of worshipping strange gods and corrupting the minds of the youth. He preferred to sacrifice his life rather than accept the censorship of his teachings. Socrates advocated free discussion, and is the first person in recorded history to formulate a philosophy of intellectual freedom. Ancient Roman society endorsed that only members of the Senate, or persons of vast authority, enjoyed the privilege of free speech. However, the extensive Roman Empire could not have remained intact for four centuries if it had not maintained a tolerant attitud ...
    Related: censorship, ancient times, democratic society, public official, adds
  • Class Struggles - 2,658 words
    ... oyer, who are the exploiters ? Who makes up the dominant class today ? This question will become clear if we bear in mind there are two ways to move goods in society, by the use of violence, which is the political way, by trade and gifts, which is the economic way. Capitalism is the use of trade and gifts, not the use of politics, to distribute goods in society. All other regimes resort to violence. Marx and Engels emphasize the point themselves. Feudalism and slavery are based on state coactive powers. The results of their work are simply confiscated from the workers, and if they do not like it and try to escape, policemen and soldiers will drag them back to where they belong, so they m ...
    Related: class struggle, middle class, ruling class, technological innovation, total population
  • Collective Bargaining In The Workplace - 2,202 words
    Collective Bargaining In The Workplace Britain has one of the most developed systems of collective bargaining in the world, especially amongst manual workers. Its sophistication is one of the main reasons why British workers traditionally pressed less for the statutory provision of basic rights in the work place than their Continental colleagues. Most trade unionists prefer to put a grievance through procedure' rather than go to an industrial tribunal. Dubin has described collective bargaining as the great social invention that has institutionalised industrial conflict' and by the Donovan Commission as right which is or should be the prerogative of every worker in a democratic society'. It c ...
    Related: bargaining, collective, collective action, collective bargaining, workplace
  • Constitution - 1,279 words
    Constitution With the Constitution the elite society protected rights for every American that would secure and ensure our nations existence for hundreds of years. Under the Articles of Confederation, the United States government was in a state of chaos. To end the existing chaos and build a stronger democratic society for the future, the government would need to be more powerful and centralized. Thus, the elite class established the rules and boundaries that would protect the rights of all citizens from a suppressive government. The Articles created a weak, almost non-existent government had neither an executive or judicial branch, which meant that it lacked enforcement powers. The newly for ...
    Related: constitution, states government, american people, continental army, declaration
  • Current Problems Of Education - 1,097 words
    Current Problems Of Education CURRENT PROBLEMS OF EDUCATION It seems reasonable to begin a discussion of the future of computers in education with considerations of the current problems of education. Then we can direct our use of technology to improve education. I do not mean to imply that there would be universal agreement on these problems or that this list is exhaustive; but these serious problems deserve careful preliminary consideration in restructuring our educational systems. They are worldwide problems that affect all levels of education. I begin with what I regard as the root of many of the grand problems of today: the problem of population. The number of people on earth is growing ...
    Related: computers in education, education system, major problem, problem solving, interactive learning
  • Democracy History - 966 words
    Democracy History The word democracy is derived from two Greek words: demos, meaning "the people," and kratos, meaning, "rule." A democracy is a way of governing in which the whole body of citizens takes charge of its own affairs. As citizens of towns, cities, states, provinces, and nations, the people are the sovereigns, the source of power. Democracy means that they can freely make the decisions about what is best for them: what policies to adopt and what taxes to pay. An authoritarian government is a government where they tell people what to do and expect the people to obey. This obedience is usually justified in the name of some higher value to which an individuals interests and rights m ...
    Related: democracy, history, john stuart mill, decision making process, vote
  • Democracy In America - 1,069 words
    "Democracy in America" Alexis De Tocquevilles Democracy in America delves deep into how the American States and the federal government would grow politically and socially under the umbrella of democracy. He sees the United States as a unique entity because of how and why it started as well as its geographical location. De Tocqueville explains that the foundations of the democratic process in America are completely different from anywhere else on the globe. The land was virginal and the colonies had almost complete sovereignty from England from the very beginning because they were separated by an ocean and financial troubles. The people who came to America were the oppressed and unhappy in En ...
    Related: america, democracy, democracy in america, social democracy, democratic society
  • Drug Legalization - 1,972 words
    Drug Legalization The debate over drugs and drug legalization is an increasingly important political issue as we proceed into the twenty-first century. It is important that we proceed into this era with a keen sense of direction on this issue. Whether we increase our current laws or we proceed in the direction legalization. It is obvious that some reformation of our current policy is needed. But, the drug legalization debate is not a issue that should only concern our political officials and law makers. It should concern all of us, since all of us are affected by the laws governing the trade and use of drugs. In this paper I will address the drug legalization debate from the view of the anti ...
    Related: drug control, drug enforcement, drug enforcement agency, drug legalization, drug policy, drug prohibition, drug trade
  • Education - 711 words
    Education Everyday a middle class child goes to school. They are taught to read and write. This child is also taught that they will play sports in high school, have a perfect GPA and attend a good college. From kindergarten through a child's senior year in high school they are told taught what to want from their future. It is not always the books and the curriculum that shape these childens lives. It is the teachers who tell these children to study hard because college is going to be much harder. From the first day of school every child is shaped to the mold of what their parents, teachers, and society want. Coming home from the hospital every baby is introduced to their first form of instit ...
    Related: bell hooks, democratic society, social structure, fitting, comfortable
  • Educational Reform In A Pluralistic Society - 1,117 words
    Educational Reform In A Pluralistic Society My personal philosophy of education is that every child has the right to an education. This education should be such that every student has the equal opportunity to succeed and learn at the highest level they are capable. I believe that the purpose of education is to educate people who are well-rounded individuals. By well-rounded, I am referring to graduates who will be able to apply their education to numerous aspects of life. This includes people who are going to college and people who will be entering the work force directly from high school. Every person should have a wide base of knowledge to draw from and add to throughout their life. This t ...
    Related: democratic society, educational, educational reform, educational system, pluralistic, reform
  • European History - 1,090 words
    European History Charles et Secondat, Baron de la Brede et de Montesquieu Charles de Secondat, Baron de la Brede et de Montesquieu was born in 1689 to a French noble family. "His family tree could be traced 350 years, which in his view made its name neither good nor bad." (The Encyclopedia of Social Sciences, p. 68) Montesquieu's views started to be shaped at a very early age. A beggar was chosen to be his godfather to remind him of his obligations to the poor. Montesquieu's education started at the age of 11 when he was sent to Juilly, a school maintained by the Congregation of the Oratory. From 1705 to 1709 he studied law in Bordeaux. "From 1705 to 1709 he was a legal apprentice in Paris. ...
    Related: european history, history, roman history, world history, separation of powers
  • Euthanasia - 366 words
    Euthanasia Euthanasia in my opinion has many circumstances yielding many different opinions on this subject. The first circumstance that comes to mind is that of a person such as that discussed in the text, where a person, young or old is suffering from some type of terminal illness. This circumstance is obviously one in which the patient is destined to death and is in obvious pain. Though I would not want to make this decision myself I do not think that the patient should be denied of their "right to die." I think that if all involved are consensual in the ending of the person's life the doctor should not be legally persecuted for their actions. There will always be the argument that doctor ...
    Related: euthanasia, passive euthanasia, terminal illness, personal ethics, painful
  • Evolution Of Labor Unions - 884 words
    Evolution Of Labor Unions What is clearly evident is that the working people of America have had to unite in struggle to achieve the gains that they have accumulated during this century. Improvements did not come easily. Organizing unions, winning the right to representation, using the collective bargaining process as the core of their activities, struggling against bias and discrimination, the working men and women of America have built a trade union movement of formidable proportions. Labor in America has correctly been described as a stabilizing force in the national economy and a bulwark of our democratic society. Furthermore, the gains that unions have been able to achieve have brought ...
    Related: american labor, evolution, labor, labor law, labor movement, labor union, labor unions
  • Feminist Backlash: The Unconscious - 1,377 words
    Feminist Backlash: The Unconscious Undermining of Genuine Equality American people come in a variety of shapes and sizes; their thoughts, fears, and convictions differ widely. It is usually necessary for Americans to choose a status in politics and community; but it is obvious that among specific groups and organizations, a persons beliefs and opinions differ dramatically from the next. Feminist groups, specifically in the last twenty years, have announced their view of membership as an elite group of woman who must have the same specific convictions. Moreover, they denounce anyone who does not, as irrational and supporting the continuance of subordination of women. Feminist propaganda is of ...
    Related: feminist, feminist movement, unconscious, christian coalition, susan b anthony
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