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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: democracy

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  • American Democracy - 821 words
    American Democracy American Democracy The American democracy is one of the most peaceful kinds of government in the world although it is a long way from utopia. The democracy in which we live has many strengths and weaknesses. Neither strengths or weaknesses out weigh one another, but it is necessary to have both due to the varying definitions. A democracy is a government that is run by the people. The politicians that we elect to run our government are human and they are susceptible to mistakes based on their own strengths and weaknesses. The strengths and weaknesses they possess are reflected into our government but at least we the people elect them and they are not chosen for us. We live ...
    Related: american, american democracy, american political, democracy, founding fathers
  • Americans Democracy - 366 words
    American`s Democracy Americas role for the next century will be to stay economically stable. That will be no problem unless something disastrous will happen like another Stock Market crash or Nuclear Holocaust. America in the future also needs to increase peace to every nation in the world. America needs to get rid of all poverty and increase education. To stay economically stable, America needs to keep trade relations and keep wars out of our future. We need to keep the national dept. low and keep all Americans income as high as possible. Another way to be economically stable is to keep American businesses on top of the national competition, mainly in electronics considering it is the elect ...
    Related: american citizen, democracy, international competition, stock market, economically
  • Background And Emergence Of Democracy In The British North American Colonies - 730 words
    Background and Emergence of Democracy in the British North American Colonies Beginning in the early 1600's, North America experienced a flood of emigrants from England who were searching for religious freedom, an escape from political oppression, and economic opportunity. Their emigration from England was not forced upon them by the government, but offered by private groups whose chief motive was profit. The emergence of Democracy in colonial America can be attributed to the coming about of several institutions and documents filled with new and "unconventional" ideas that were brought about by a people tired of bickering among themselves and being torn apart by strife. The Anglo-American pol ...
    Related: american, american colonies, american constitution, american political, anglo american, british, british north
  • Background And Emergence Of Democracy In The British North American Colonies - 730 words
    Background and Emergence of Democracy in the British North American Colonies Beginning in the early 1600's, North America experienced a flood of emigrants from England who were searching for religious freedom, an escape from political oppression, and economic opportunity. Their emigration from England was not forced upon them by the government, but offered by private groups whose chief motive was profit. The emergence of Democracy in colonial America can be attributed to the coming about of several institutions and documents filled with new and "unconventional" ideas that were brought about by a people tired of bickering among themselves and being torn apart by strife. The Anglo-American pol ...
    Related: american, american colonies, american constitution, american political, anglo american, british, british north
  • Background And Emergence Of Democracy In The British North American Colonies - 732 words
    Background and Emergence of Democracy in the British North American Colonies Beginning in the early 1600's, North America experienced a flood of emigrants from England who were searching for religious freedom, an escape from political oppression, and economic opportunity. Their emigration from England was not forced upon them by the government, but offered by private groups whose chief motive was profit. The emergence of Democracy in colonial America can be attributed to the coming about of several institutions and documents filled with new and "unconventional" ideas that were brought about by a people tired of bickering among themselves and being torn apart by strife. The Anglo-American pol ...
    Related: american, american colonies, american constitution, american political, anglo american, british, british north
  • Chinese Democracy Movements - 2,363 words
    Chinese Democracy Movements In 1978, stimulated by the opening of China to the West and also by the "reversal of verdicts" against the 1976 Tiananmen protesters (These demonstrations against the gang of four had been condemned as counter-revolutionary at the time but were now declared a revolutionary act), thousands of Chinese began to put their thoughts into words, their words onto paper and their paper onto walls to be read by passers by. The most famous focus of these displays became a stretch of blank wall just to the west of the former forbidden city in Beijing, part of which was now a museum and park and part the cluster of residences for China's most senior National leaders. Because o ...
    Related: chinese, chinese people, chinese revolution, democracy, science and technology
  • Citizen Competence In A Democracy - 1,517 words
    Citizen Competence In A Democracy Citizens tend to make political decisions that are affected by their understanding of political institutions. People with a full understanding of political institutions have conceptual maps of the world that are less uncertain. Without this knowledge people see economic and social change as more uncertain and unexplainable. Any discussion of citizen competence must acknowledge the importance of political knowledge in helping people to evaluate politicians and policies. Citizens limited knowledge of political institutions and the effect on their world-views are particularly strong because Americans have little knowledge about their own government and the inst ...
    Related: citizen, competence, democracy, role playing, national survey
  • Communism And Democracy - 845 words
    Communism And Democracy The United States of America is a country that believes in democracy and has unfavorable ties with communist countries. The United States has tried for decades to improve relations with the countries that dont practice democracy. History shows disagreements between the United States and dictators of these irreverent countries, disagreements that brought the world to the brink of nuclear war. The most recent of these confrontations involved three countries. United States of America, Cuba and the Union of Soviet Socialist Republic (USSR). Fidel Castro is a Cuban revolutionary, who took control of Cuba in 1959 and established a Communist dictatorship. Castro, who was bor ...
    Related: communism, democracy, u.s. government, president john, fidel
  • Communisn Versus Democracy - 541 words
    Communisn Versus Democracy Communism is an original system of society, quite different from Democracy in many ways. While total democracy is not widely spread, many forms of it are prosperous throughout the world today. One of the first and major differences between a Communist and Democratic government is their contrary economic systems. In a communist government, the community owns the major resources and means of production. The goal of such a system is to prevent any one person or group of people from becoming radically rich, while others are extremely poor. The system attempts to eliminate lower class by balancing the wealth between rich and poor, therefore giving everyone equal pay and ...
    Related: democracy, versus, world countries, world today, counting
  • Deffenses For Democracy - 1,381 words
    Deffenses For Democracy Is liberty a bad thing? Socrates seemed to think so. In Book VIII of Platos Republic, Socrates criticizes democracy by attacking three of its most important aspects: liberty, equality, and majority rule. He asserts that because of these things, a democratic city will always fall into tyranny. I disagree, and feel that all three of the principles are essential to a fair and just city, and only in their absence can a city be taken into tyranny. Socrates begins his observations on the defects of a democratic government by first attacking liberty. His main argument is that there is entirely too much of it. People in a democracy are free to do what they wish in their lives ...
    Related: democracy, constitutional convention, soviet union, karl marx, describing
  • Democracy - 402 words
    Democracy Ricky Ramoutar Critical Lens M.E. Sullivan said, "Democracy is only as successful as the people who make it work," proves itself in the novel Lord of the Flies. I agree with this statement because, if there are to many people opposing one thing there will be war. The boys in this book struggled back and forth trying to establish a stable government. Democracy was forming in the group but, dictatorship was quickly sneaking up behind. Democracy was an essential thing for the boys to survive on the island. Ralph tried to form a democratic nation from the beginning using the conch as a symbol. Everyone listened when the conch was blown. The system was working but after a couple months ...
    Related: democracy, lord of the flies, right people, meetings, critical
  • Democracy - 1,277 words
    ... the South, promising them better trade relations with the troubled Asian markets in the 1970s (Avirett 22). All these are just a few examples of politicians taking every advantage possible to gain more money for their campaigns, undermining the legitimacy of the American government. The method in which we elect the President, on the other hand, is fairly legitimate. The electoral college consists of representatives who we elect, who then elect the President. Because this fills the requirement of regularly scheduled elections, it is a legitimate process. The President is extremely powerful in foreign policy making; so powerful that scholars now speak of the "Imperial Presidency," implying ...
    Related: democracy, american government, judicial review, united states government, asian
  • Democracy - 758 words
    Democracy George Bernard Shaw once said: "Democracy substitutes election by the incompetent many incompetent many for appointment by the corrupt few...", and while I don't have nearly such a bleak outlook on our method of government, Mr. Shaw does hold an iota of truth in his quotation. In a perfect world, where everyone is informed, intelligent, and aware of their system of administration, democracy would work perfectly. In a world where there are different personalities, dissimilar concerns and divergent points of view, democracy falls short of the ideal of having all people being equal. Similarly, having a Philosopher-King or an equivalent in control of a country sounds fine on paper, but ...
    Related: democracy, power over, george bernard shaw, paying attention, monarch
  • Democracy - 401 words
    Democracy Democracy Complete and true democracy is almost impossible to achieve, and has been the primary goal of many nations, beginning from ancient civilizations of Greece and Roman Empire, all the way to the government of the United States today. There are a few essential characteristics which must be present in a political system for it to be even considered democratic. One essential characteristic of a legitimate democracy is that it allows people to freely make choices without government intervention. Another necessary characteristic which legitimates government is that every vote must count equally: one vote for every person. For this equality to occur, all people must be subject to ...
    Related: democracy, political system, minority rights, united states government, percentage
  • Democracy As Myth - 1,559 words
    Democracy As Myth Each of us is aware that change is everywhere we look. No segment of society is exempt. We as the public are dealing with the advent of continuous and ever increasing change. Change in technology, change in resource availability, change in national demographics, change in workforce diversity, change in simply every facet of the organizational environment and context in which public institutions must operate. Change, as the saying goes, has truly become the only constant. The challenge for organizations is whether they can become flexible enough, fast enough. And will they do it on terms set by the organizational culture, and then adapt and succeed in the face of it or will ...
    Related: democracy, myth, customer focus, industrial revolution, objectives
  • Democracy History - 966 words
    Democracy History The word democracy is derived from two Greek words: demos, meaning "the people," and kratos, meaning, "rule." A democracy is a way of governing in which the whole body of citizens takes charge of its own affairs. As citizens of towns, cities, states, provinces, and nations, the people are the sovereigns, the source of power. Democracy means that they can freely make the decisions about what is best for them: what policies to adopt and what taxes to pay. An authoritarian government is a government where they tell people what to do and expect the people to obey. This obedience is usually justified in the name of some higher value to which an individuals interests and rights m ...
    Related: democracy, history, john stuart mill, decision making process, vote
  • Democracy In America - 1,069 words
    "Democracy in America" Alexis De Tocquevilles Democracy in America delves deep into how the American States and the federal government would grow politically and socially under the umbrella of democracy. He sees the United States as a unique entity because of how and why it started as well as its geographical location. De Tocqueville explains that the foundations of the democratic process in America are completely different from anywhere else on the globe. The land was virginal and the colonies had almost complete sovereignty from England from the very beginning because they were separated by an ocean and financial troubles. The people who came to America were the oppressed and unhappy in En ...
    Related: america, democracy, democracy in america, social democracy, democratic society
  • Democracy In America - 1,107 words
    ... s rampant and no one seems to care if justice or punishment is served or not. Many are very disillusioned with the government and think it is easier to do nothing than to become involved and try to change it. This is in direct relation to de Tocquevilles notion that democracies have a tendency to lose liberty and personal interest as the country grows larger. Not only with more people are there bound to be more differing ideas, but more people who share them, creating more voiced dissonance in the political sphere. This dissonance is glossed over when still in the minority. "[T]he tyranny of the majority" is one of de Tocquevilles main concerns with democratic nations. When a government ...
    Related: america, century america, democracy, democracy in america, first century
  • Democracy In Athens - 1,208 words
    Democracy In Athens A Democracy is defined as a government of, by and for the people. Originally, democracy meant rule by the common people. In this sense, and even before the beginning of modern class society, it was very much a class affair. It meant that power should be in the hands of the largest class: the poorest, least educated and the propertyless. As a result, democracy was feared and rejected by the educated, the cultured, and the wealthy. In classical Greece, democracy was seen by the enlightened and the educated as one of the worst types of government and society imaginable. The rule of the people was regarded as a threat to all the cherished values of a civilized and orderly soc ...
    Related: ancient athens, athenian democracy, athens, democracy, political power
  • Democracy In Athens - 1,159 words
    ... il met everyday, except for festival days and certain other forbidden days, in the Bouleuterion in the Agora. When the Assembly met, the Council would meet in the afternoon since most Assembly meetings lasted only till noon. The primary responsibilities of this body were the preparation of an agenda for the assembly and the supervision of the magistrates. Just as the Assembly required a smaller body (the Council) to prepare business for it, the Council needed a group much smaller than 500 to supervise its activities. This supervision was performed by each contingent of 50 Council members from one tribe, serving in turn (decided by lot) as prytaneis or "presiding officers" for 1/10 of the ...
    Related: ancient athens, athenian democracy, athens, democracy, direct democracy, modern democracy
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