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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: define

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  • Others May Ask How You Define Success This Is More Difficult Success Is Relative: Not Everbody Wants To Put Together A Fourbi - 422 words
    Others may ask how you define success. THis is more difficult. Success is relative: not everbody wants to put together a four-billion-dollar conglomerater, or become president of teh United States, or win the Nobel Peace Prize. It is usually a mistake to begin wiht such grandiose ambitions, which tend to degenerate into lazy daydreams. The best way to succeed is to begin with a reasonably realistic goal and attain it, rather than aim at something so far beyond your reach that you are bound to fail. It's also important to make a habit of succeeding, and the easiest way to start is to succeed at something, however small, everday, gradually increasing the level of your ambitions and achevements ...
    Related: define, nobel peace prize, social customs, nobel peace, morality
  • Philosophy Is A Study That Tries To Define And Explain How People In A Community Should Live Wisely In His Life Of Lycurgus, - 618 words
    Philosophy is a study that tries to define and explain how people in a community should live wisely. In his "Life of Lycurgus", Plutarch wrote "...Lycurgus produced an inimitable constitution,... showing... the spectacle of an entire city acting like philosophers..." (Readings, p.185). Unlike other philosophers, Lycurgus ideas were practical; his laws didnt just describe the proper way of living, but also put it to work. Using his constitution, Spartans became harmonious, developed feelings of honor, self-reliance, and self-control which the leader believed were the keys to living wisely. In addition such destructive force as individualism was replaced by a desire to serve the community. Lyc ...
    Related: define, philosophy, wisely, self reliance, state education
  • The Use Of Dialectic To Define Justice - 1,276 words
    The Use Of Dialectic To Define Justice Through the use of Socratic dialogue, Plato has an advantage at obtaining answers by refuting other philosophers. Plato is able to achieve an answer to the question, what is justice. He derives this answer through an analogy of the ideal city. The ideal city parallels the concept of the ideal person as Plato uncovers with the aid of dialectic. Plato defines justice as a function of harmony, which must first be achieved in an individual before being extended to the city. Speaking through Socrates Plato defines justice as a philosophical understanding of excellence in the organization of society and human soul. In book IV Socrates refutes the notion that ...
    Related: define, dialectic, state laws, socratic method, consistent
  • When Studying Gender, The First Task Is To Clearly Define What It Is Not Gender Simply Can Not Be Defined By Ones Anatomy In - 1,857 words
    When studying gender, the first task is to clearly define what it is not. Gender simply can not be defined by one's anatomy. In other words, gender is not categorized as male or female. Stating this fact is of the utmost importance, because most people would define gender in such a way. In fact, some dictionaries actually define gender as See sex. So now that I have withdrawn that determinant, I must conclude that gender is something which is determined socially. Unfortunately, the concept is far too broad to have one clear definition. It can be studied in so many different ways, and it is because of this that there are a multitude of theories about it. Learning about differing theories stim ...
    Related: anatomy, define, gender, gender inequality, studying
  • Physical Development - 886 words
    1.) There are 4 types of development. Physical development covers the learning of the ability to walk. It also encompasses all muscle development, and the idea that the person generally becomes more physically efficient over time. Cognitive development deals with the development of a way to think. For example, an infant tends to over generalize information. If he sees an animal and is told that it is a dog, any furry animal with 4 legs and a tale will be considered a dog. As cognitive development progresses, a person learns to be specific. We also build a sense of problem solving. Personal development refers to the changes in an individual's personality. As time progresses, and people learn ...
    Related: cognitive development, personal development, physical development, social development, building blocks
  • 1984 - 834 words
    1984 "Few novels written in this generation have obtained a popularity as great as that of George Orwells 1984." George Orwells popular and powerful novel was not just a figment of his imagination, it was spawned from many experiences from childhood to early adulthood, as well as from events circa World War II. At age eight, he was shipped off to boarding school where he was the only scholarship student among aristocrats. This was Orwells first taste of dictatorship, of being helpless under the rule of an absolute power. Unlike his classmates, Orwell was unable to afford to go to Oxford or Cambridge and his grades kept him from winning any more scholarships (Scott-Kilvert, 98). Therefore, he ...
    Related: 1984, early adulthood, marshall cavendish corporation, methods used, police
  • Towards Innovation - 1,518 words
    "Towards Innovation" The world today is experiencing the most rapid pace of change in its history. The purpose of this essay is to discuss what organizational structure is suitable in the business circumstances of today. This essay will argue that 'the environment of the 21st century is such, that to be effective, organizations are tending towards less formalized structures than used in the past'. To support this argument, firstly organizations will be defined, and then the properties that make an organization effective will be identified. Next organizational structure will be appraised, and what constitutes business environment will be established. Finally the influences globalisation and t ...
    Related: innovation, information exchange, work activities, business environment, workforce
  • A Line Of Promises - 1,314 words
    A Line Of Promises A Line of Promises Many times simple objects in peoples lives can come to represent a part of themselves. The object can become an integral part of a persons identity. In Wedding-Ring by Denise Levertov, the relationship between a woman and her old wedding ring is explored as a way to intertwine the womans life with the rings meaning. Through the ring, the woman identifies herself. The wedding ring is wishfully transformed from a complex symbol of promises to a simple gift of friendship. In the opening of Wedding-Ring, Levertov sets the tone of the poem, by exemplifying the interaction between the speakers feelings and the wedding ring. My wedding ring lies in a basket / a ...
    Related: true value, power over, negative aspects, abandoned, bright
  • A Postmodern Age - 1,423 words
    A Post-Modern Age? A Post-Modern Age? Introduction: Post-Modernism can be described as a particular style of thought. It is a concept that correlates the emergence of new features and types of social life and economic order in a culture; often called modernization, post-industrial, consumer, media, or multinational capitalistic societies. In Modernity, we have the sense or idea that the present is discontinuous with the past, that through a process of social, technological, and cultural change (either through improvement, that is, progress, or through decline) life in the present is fundamentally different from life in the past. This sense or idea as a world view contrasts with what is commo ...
    Related: postmodern, american market, european history, post modern, depot
  • A Postmodern Age - 1,398 words
    ... t is the idea that areas of existence and culture can be separated from, that is abstracted out of, other areas of existence and culture. In addition, we tend to form social groups that are largely based on abstractions (corporations, nations, economic classes, religious preferences, race (which is really an abstract rather than a physical or biological category or relationship), sexual preferences, etc.). As a result, membership in social groups tends to be unstable and transitory as one can easily move between social groups. This, again, creates a high sense of anxiety and tension; this anxiety results, on the one hand, in attempts within these abstract groups to define and redefine th ...
    Related: postmodern, social life, media images, popular culture, ties
  • A Practical Approach To Television Violence - 1,290 words
    A Practical Approach To Television Violence As difficult as this issue is, I believe it can be addressed. My report shows that some progress has already begun in several areas. Attention needs to be focused on how and why some programming has begun to move in the right direction and why the rest has not. What this issue needs, more than anything else, is cool heads on all sides of the problem: the network executives, the creative community, the government, researchers and advocacy groups. All sides need to worry less about how each development affects only them and instead look at the needs of everyone.(U.C.L.A. 5) In the broadcast world, the four television networks, ABC, CBS, FOX, and NBC, ...
    Related: practical, television, television programming, television violence, violence, violence on television
  • A Risk Neutral Framework For The Pricing Of Credit Derivatives - 1,476 words
    A Risk Neutral Framework For The Pricing Of Credit Derivatives 1. INTRODUCTION Considerable research effort has gone into Credit Derivatives since the early 1990s. The roots of credit derivatives can be traced back to the notion that the credit risk of a firm can be captured by the credit rating ascribed to it. This premise is also the cornerstone of loan pricing and credit risk management models the world over, including J.P. Morgans CreditMetricsTM. Empirical research enables the predictability of the event of default as well as the Loss in the Event of Default (LIED). This information is expressed in terms of a transition matrix - a matrix that traces out the probabilities the migration o ...
    Related: credit, credit risk, derivatives, framework, neutral, pricing, risk management
  • A Study Of Catholicism - 592 words
    A Study of Catholicism A Study of Catholicism When "catholic" is used as an adjective, it means universal, open or general. I have read art magazines and reviews that have described certain art collections as "catholic in its uniqueness." The fact that Catholicism has its root in the word "catholic" is not a coincidence. In his essay "Catholicism: A Synthesis," Richard McBrien says that it is this notion that distinguishes Catholicism from other religions, Christian and non. The notion is that Catholicism is a religion that is based on open-mindedness. McBrien alludes to flags to clearly define his thesis. Many flags of the world share the same three colors. He uses the colors red, white, an ...
    Related: catholicism, human beings, catholic church, young girl, awareness
  • A Style Consistent With The Message - 487 words
    A Style Consistent With The Message Redemption of the spirit and soul, Eternity, Heaven, and Hell have always been solemn, undisclosed, and indirect subjects. Such important matters of life deserve a more appropriate approach. These subjects need to be clearly understood and firmly discussed. They are extremely urgent and must be elaborately explained to all that they may concern. In "Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God," Jonathan Edwards extensively enhances the urgency of turning lives over to God through a provocative style filled with vivid illustrations and elaborate imagery. One recognizes that the style of this work is extremely aggressive and graphic. Edward's word choice is quite n ...
    Related: consistent, writing style, jonathan edwards, profound, withdraw
  • Abortion - 1,138 words
    Abortion Abortion has been one of the topics of hot debate for the last three decades in our nation. Since the Roe v/s Wade decision in 1973, some Americans feel the need to ponder whether aborting fetuses is a moral action. On the one hand, some people feel that abortion should be legal because a woman has a right to choose whether she wants to continue a pregnancy or not. It's her body. On the other hand, some feel that fetuses have no advocates and deserve a right to live, so it is immoral to abandon their rights and kill them. This issue is not only at the center of political debate, but philosophical debate as well. In this paper, I will examine and critique Mary Anne Warren's On the Mo ...
    Related: abortion, hierarchy of needs, moral status, right to life, personhood
  • Abortion - 1,236 words
    Abortion "At the heart of liberty is the right to define one's own concept of existence, of meaning, of the universe, and of the mystery of human life. Beliefs about these matters could not define the attributes of personhood were they formed under compulsion of the State."1 U.S. Supreme Court Justices O'Conner, Kennedy and Souter Planned Parenthood of Southeastern Pennsylvania v. Casey Abortion in the United States Before Roe When Roe v. Wade was decided in January 1973, abortion except to save a woman's life was banned in nearly two-thirds of the states.2 Laws in most of the remaining states contained only a few additional exceptions.3 It is estimated that each year 1.2 million women resor ...
    Related: abortion, abortion laws, family planning, human life, secure
  • Abortion - 1,429 words
    Abortion In our society, there are many ethical dilemmas that we are faced with that are virtually impossible to solve. One of the most difficult and controversial issues that we are faced with is abortion. There are many strong arguments both for and against the right to have an abortion which are so complicated that it becomes impossible to resolve. The complexity of this issue lies in the different aspects of the argument. The essence of a person, rights, and who is entitled to these rights, are a few of the many aspects which are very difficult to define. There are also issues of what circumstances would justify abortion. Because the issue of abortion is virtually impossible to solve, al ...
    Related: abortion, american society, self defense, birth control, defining
  • Accomplice Liabilty - 2,666 words
    Accomplice Liabilty Questions Presented 1. Whether a person in Alaska can be charged as an accomplice to an unintentional crime, when Alaskan courts required that one must have the specific intent to promote or facilitate the offense? 2. Whether the mother was the legal cause of her children's death, when she permitted the father to take the children in his car when he was drunk? Statement of the Case The appellant, Elaine Benis, was indicted in the County of Norchester, on one count of manslaughter, pursuant to A.S. 11.41.120. (R. at 1.) She was also indicted for one count of accessory to manslaughter, pursuant to A.S. 11.41.120 and A.S. 11.16.110. (R. at 1). After the presentation of the p ...
    Related: oxford dictionary, drunk driving, supreme court, traffic, commission
  • Add And Learning Strategies - 1,641 words
    Add And Learning Strategies Attention can be defined as the process of selecting certain environmental inputs needed for cognitive processing. Information that we are capable of sensing stays with us in the sensory register for a very brief period of time. From this point the information is cognitively processed. The role of attention can be found in the moving of this information from the sensory register into the working memory. Normal attention span seems to develop in three stages. First, the childs attention is said to be overly exclusive. This is a term used by psychologists to describe attention that is focused on a single object for a long period of time while tuning out all other st ...
    Related: classroom learning, learning environment, learning experience, learning strategies, family history
  • Advertising And Media - 1,437 words
    Advertising And Media The evolution of the mass media is very interesting subject of study that presents variations according to different circumstances. One of these is the place where this evolution takes place. Because media as institutions are part of society, are influenced from any particular characteristic that each society has. In the case of Greece, it's really interesting to see how the evolution of a medium like radio, has been affected by the particular characteristics of Greek society and more specifically by Greek politics. The particularity of the Greek case, as Papathanassopoulos points up, is that the Greek state is hyper centralized because of the dictatorial periods that G ...
    Related: advertising, broadcast media, mass media, media, radio station
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