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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: declaration

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  • Declaration Of Independance From Puberty - 299 words
    Declaration Of Independance From Puberty We the teenagers, of the people, of this world submit this list of injustices and wrong doings that mother nature has laid upon us. We protest against acne, a cruel and horrifying thing that occurs to some selected teenagers. This punishment is cruel and undeserving. At times an individual with this dilemma may experience young children questioning if chickenpox are on the ill-fated person. Also the individual has quite a hard time finding a companion to flirt without utterly humiliating themselves. One who has this problem may go through many circumstances that make the individual lose self of steam. Other unjust transpiration of pubescence years are ...
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  • Declaration Of Independence - 1,341 words
    Declaration Of Independence The Declaration of Independence is perhaps the most masterfully written document of Western civilization. This essay seeks to illuminate that artistry by probing the discourse microscopically at the level of the sentence, phrase, word, and syllable. By approaching the Declaration in this way, we can shed light both on its literary qualities and on its rhetorical power as a work designed to convince the American colonies they were justified in seeking to establish them as an independent nation. The introduction consists of the first paragraph a single, lengthy, periodic sentence: When in the Course of human events, it becomes necessary for one people to dissolve th ...
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  • Interpertation Of The Declaration Of Independence - 273 words
    Interpertation Of The Declaration Of Independence At some point in time, it may become necessary for the governed to abolish the government and set up a new government because it failed to protect the people's rights. People set up governments so their rights cannot be taken away. The government gets its power from the governed. If the government failed to protect the people's rights, the people have the right to abolish the government and set up a new one. However, people do not change the government for a small reason. They do so when a government becomes doctorial such as Parliament and King George were. Great Britain did three things to cause the colonies to break off. First, the king ab ...
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  • New Declaration Oof Independece - 405 words
    New Declaration Oof Independece Each year, deluging masses of populace from foreign nations flock to America. Here, they believe they will receive the chance to embrace, savor, and exercise true Freedom. Surely, this land of wondrous opportunities would encompass them in her fruitful prosperity! But is it really a land liberated from the fetters of suppression? Are Americans as tolerant and pleasantly liberal as perceived to be? If not, then a formidable and hefty query arises: What is an American? A liberated America's building blocks are the elixirs of Equality, Freedom, and democracy. What, then, would undermine the basic structures of America more than racism? Yet, try as we might, we ca ...
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  • The Declaration Of Independence: Yesterday And Today - 473 words
    The Declaration Of Independence: Yesterday And Today Over two centuries ago, a document was drafted that demanded the world take notice. That document, the Declaration of Independence, signified that a new country was born, oppressive rule and tyrrany in the New World was at an end and new personal freedoms for citizens of that country would be allowed. The perceived message contained in this declaration has changed drastically over the many years since its drafting, however, its importance to our ever-developing culture remains intact. It is interesting to note when reviewing the early drafts of the Declaration of Independence that there were two sections removed for the final draft. These ...
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  • The Declaration Of Language - 732 words
    The Declaration of Language [WR122 paper, using Jeffersons "Declaration of Independence" as a model]-RJ The Declaration of Language When, in the course of human language, it becomes necessary for people to create or redefine, words or phrases to express an object or an action; and to assume, among society, the acceptance and usage of these words and their definitions, in ones own language, or idiolect. A decent respect to the opinions of mankind, requires that Americans should recognize slang adopted into language. We hold these truths to be self-evident: that language is expression of thought, in the form of speech or written symbols, that have agreed-upon meanings. That, many large speakin ...
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  • The Power Of The Declaration - 1,219 words
    The Power Of The Declaration Power and The Declaration of Independence There are many abstractions in the Declaration of Independence. These abstractions such as: rights, freedom, liberty and happiness have become the foundations of American society and have helped to shape the American Identity. Power, another abstraction that reoccurs in all the major parts of the Declaration of Independence plays an equally important role in shaping American Identity. One forgets the abstraction of power, because it appears in relation to other institutions: the legislature, the King, the earth, and the military. The abstraction of power sets the tone of the Declaration, and shapes the colonists conceptio ...
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  • 1994 Baseball Strike - 1,626 words
    ... 94, the owners declared the cancellation of the World Series for the first time since 1904 (Atlantic Unbound). In mid-October, President Bill Clinton announced the appointment of William J. Usery, Jr., to mediate the dispute. The President could not have chosen a more able representative. Usery was Secretary of Labor in the Ford administration and before that was director of the Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service. Although 70 years old, Usery had remained active after his Government service by privately mediating some of the Nations biggest industrial disputes in recent years. He had the experience to identify common ground and the tenacity to move the parties in that direction, ...
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  • 272: Number Of Words That Redefined America - 1,107 words
    272: Number Of Words That Redefined America The two hundred seventy-two words of President Lincoln's Gettysburg Address are as significant today as they were six score and seventeen years ago. Garry Wills' Lincoln at Gettysburg: The Words That Remade America, explicates these two hundred seventy-two words and paints a new picture that gives us the historical context of the President's speech. It was short enough for generations of people to remember, yet at the same time, long enough to have a great impact on the ways we think of this great republic. Wills argues that through his speech Lincoln remade the American history in that Americans would interpret the Civil War, and the Constitution, ...
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  • 5 Most Influential People In American History - 1,556 words
    5 Most Influential People In American History The United Sates has had a short yet complex history in its two hundred and twenty-four years. She has produced millions and millions of great individuals. These great minds have shaped what America is today. Others, however, have personally molded this magnificent nation with their own acts. John Adams, Thomas Jefferson, John Marshall, Henry Clay and Andrew Jackson are the most influential builders of the United States of America. John Adams was born loyal to the English Crown but evolved into the second President of the Free World. As a lawyer, Adams emerged into politics as an opponent of the Stamp Act and was a leader in the Revolutionary gro ...
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  • Everyone Has The Right To Work, To Free Choice Of - 1,083 words
    "Everyone has the right to work, to free choice of employment, to just and favourable conditions of work. . .Everyone has the right to a standard of living adequate for the health and well-being of himself and of his family, including food, clothing, housing and medical care and necessary social service." These are excerpts from the Declaration of Human Rights. Written over 50 years ago, the Declaration was created to give, "inherent dignity and. . .equal and inalienable rights of all members of the human family." The Declaration gave hope to many people across the globe who were living in tyranny and oppression, hoping for equality and fair treatment. Unfortunately for some, this document t ...
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  • Everyone Has The Right To Work, To Free Choice Of - 1,033 words
    ... est problems facing sweatshop workers is the conditions under which they must work. Sweatshops vary in their conditions. One thing is certain though, on a scale the best conditions start at bad and the worst are judged as terrible. There is no bright spot to the scale. But according to the definition, (a workplace where workers are exploited in their wages or benefits and are subject to poor working conditions), the conditions are, by most accounts, hazardous and unsanitary. Typical conditions include sweltering heat and crowded working environments. In addition, in some cases there are not many fire escapes, water fountains, restrooms and other which are necessary to building codes. To ...
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  • A Peoples History Of The United States Chapter Four Summary - 831 words
    A People's History Of The United States Chapter Four Summary As the British and Colonists were engaged in the Seven Years War against the French and Indians, the colonists were slowly building up feelings for their removal from under the British crown. There had been several uprisings to overthrow the colonial governments. When the war ended and the British were victorious, they declared the Proclamation of 1763 which stated that the land west of the Appalachians was to be reserved for the Native American population. The colonists were confused and outraged and the now ambitious social elite's were raring to direct that anger against the English since the French were no longer a threat. Howe ...
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  • A Rose, By A Vulcan Name, Would Smell As Sweet - 1,201 words
    A Rose, By A Vulcan Name, Would Smell As Sweet A Rose, By a Vulcan Name, Would Smell as Sweet. Social commentary is dangerous. In addition to risking social and political censure, the commentator must carefully convey the message. In directly addressing a problem, one risks alienating an audience before making one's point. If one indirectly approaches said problem, one may appear to lack conviction or a point. Star Trek: the Original Series takes a third path, that of allegory. Unfortunately, as the television series belongs to the science fiction genre, its social significance is often disregarded. However, upon examination, it is clear that the veiled nature of commentary in Star Trek is v ...
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  • Abortion - 708 words
    Abortion Abortion The founding of our nation was forged on the principle that all men are created equal. This is the essence of our Declaration of Independence and the philosophy behind the Constitution. We, through history, have made certain that all people in this country have equality before the law. We have set up the premise that all people are equal before the law. We have declared that there is no such thing as sub-humans -- and that no human being's rights are superior to another human being. If we want to live by the premises that we set up in this country, than we cannot overlook any human being, no one can be excluded. There is, however, a class of human beings that is being denie ...
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  • Abortion And Prolife - 1,826 words
    Abortion And Pro-Life November 14, 1979, with the temperature outside at fifteen degrees, a two pound baby girl was found in a field wrapped up in a wet, dirty, old shirt. The umbilical cord was still attached, and the baby had been aborted twelve weeks prematurely. With little chance of survival, the baby was taken to a medical center. The little girl survived surgery and other efforts to save her. The baby was later adopted by, Susan Morrison, one of the nurses who attended to her. The baby was named Christelle, and now she and her mother talk to thousands of people about abortion and the pro-life movement (Maffet 13-14). This is an example of one person who felt they had the right to kill ...
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  • Abortion Debate - 925 words
    Abortion Debate!!! Abortion Debate I. Human Life Begins At Conception II. Fetus Is Separate From Mother III. Abortion Methods Are Cruel And Disgusting IV. Abortions Are Unsafe V. Immoral, Spoken Against In Bible VI. Testimonies And Survivors VII. Statistics VIII. Alternatives IX. Unusual Situations I. Human Life Begins At Conception a. 1981 U.S. Senate Judiciary Subcommittee held hearings to discuss when human life begins - majority of experts said at conception b. Haploid sperm and egg are parts of the potential, zygote is life c. Alive is having life, not dead d. Human is belonging to Homo sapiens e. A person is an individual human being f. Fetus feels pain, can taste, hear, and smell II. ...
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  • Abraham Lincoln - 1,920 words
    Abraham Lincoln Abraham Lincoln was born on February 12, 1809 in Kentucky. When he was two, the Lincolns moved a few miles to another farm on the old Cumberland Trail. A year later, his mother gave birth to another boy, Thomas, but he died a few days later. When Lincoln was seven his family moved to Indiana. In 1818, Lincolns mother died from a deadly disease called the "milk-sick." Then ten years later his sister died and left him with only his father and stepmother. Lincoln traveled to New Salem in April 1831 and settled there the following July. In the fall of 1836 he and Mrs. Bennett Abell had a deal that if she brought her single sister to New Salem he had to promise to marry her. When ...
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  • Abraham Lincoln - 1,088 words
    ... in acceptance of the Republican senatorial nomination (June 16, 1858) Lincoln suggested that Douglas, Chief Justice Roger B. Taney, and Democratic presidents Franklin Pierce and James Buchanan had conspired to nationalize slavery. In the same speech he expressed the view that the nation would become either all slave or all free: "A house divided against itself cannot stand." The underdog in the senatorial campaign, Lincoln wished to share Douglas's fame by appearing with him in debates. Douglas agreed to seven debates: in Ottawa, Freeport, Jonesboro, Charleston, Galesburg, Quincy, and Alton, Ill. Lincoln knew that Douglas--now fighting the Democratic Buchanan administration over the cons ...
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  • Acts And Theophilus - 5,222 words
    ... Luke, went northward through Macedonia. Whilst the vessel which conveyed the rest of the party sailed from Troas to Assos, Paul gained some time by making the journey by land. At Assos he went on board again. Coasting along by Mitylene, Chios, Samos and Trogyllium, they arrived at Miletus. At Miletus, however there was time to send to Ephesus, and the elders of the church were invited to come down to him there. This meeting is made the occasion for recording another characteristic and representative address of St. Paul. The course of the voyage from Miletas was by Coos and Rhodes to Patara, and from Patara in another vessel past Cyprus to Tyre. Here Paul and his company spent seven days. ...
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