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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: death sentence

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  • A Dark Moment In Time - 830 words
    A Dark Moment in Time The book, The Crucible by Arthur Miller, is a well-written drama of how scapegoating gone to the extreme can bring about tremendous contention and chaos even among the simplest of people. In this case, the victims of scapegoating were the citizens of Salem, Massachusetts. I feel that Miller did an excellent job on the way in which he conveyed the setting, characters, and plot. The story takes place in Salem, Massachusetts in 1692. In their society there is only black and white, right and wrong. Given that the era is the 1600's we know that their lives weren't very complex back then. The people back then mainly farmed and worked from sun up till sun down. Therefore we kn ...
    Related: work cited, arthur miller, john proctor, massachusetts, embarrassment
  • A Lesson From Oliver - 5,155 words
    A Lesson From Oliver by David Jorgensen Like any other morning I was up at four, the day Oliver met with his violent death. At four in the morning the grass is wet. Now, it's still wet at 6 a.m. and even at seven, and these tend to be the hours of choice for most people wishing to appreciate the phenomenon of grass wetness. But it's a tragedy of economics that, when work starts at 5 a.m., one is not afforded the same time-options for grass appreciation as members of the sane world. Nor was this tragedy confined to my having to appreciate the wet grass while in a metabolic state more suited to hibernation. Four a.m. was my only chance to absorb all of northern Ontario's summer morning treasur ...
    Related: lesson, oliver, decision making, prime minister, initiated
  • Abortion Paper - 1,933 words
    Abortion Paper The coexistence of opposite and conflicting feelings about abortion is centuries old. Disagreements between public policy, morality and individual behavior on this issue existed even at the time of Plato and Aristotle. In the past few decades abortion issue has been brought into sharper focus and has been vigorously debated. A number of factors are responsible for this but perhaps the major one has been that associated with the sexual revolution which accentuates freedom in all matters sexual and in spite of or even because of the tremendous and indiscriminate increase in the distribution of contraceptives. Judges have ruled, politicians have legislated, but the controversy on ...
    Related: abortion, death sentence, welfare programs, the bible, metal
  • Absurdity And The Stranger - 615 words
    Absurdity And The Stranger Absurdity is defined as that which is contrary to reason; clearly untrue, unreasonable or ridiculous. It is often a topic in existentialist writings relating to life. This subject is prevalent in Camus The Stranger and The Myth of Sisyphus. Camus depicts absurdity bringing about happiness or indifference in each of these literary works. In The Myth of Sisyphus, it is made clear that Sisyphus is aware that his existence is absurd. He is sentenced to an eternity of rolling a boulder up a steep mountain only to let it roll back down when it reaches its peak. His tragedy lies in the fact that he is conscious of the extent of his own misery. He is the ultimate absurd; t ...
    Related: absurdity, stranger, death sentence, moral code, complain
  • Against Capital Punishment - 1,191 words
    ... uggests that rather than deterring homicide, state executions may actually increase the murder rate. This phenomenon has been named the brutalization hypothesis. It suggests that through suggestion, modeling, or by legitimizing killing, homicide numbers increase. In a study taken from 1957 to 1982 by Isaac Ehrlich, the number of executions in 1957 was 65 and the number of murders was 8,060. From 1958 to1960 the execution rate stayed roughly the same, but the murder rate increased (Bender& Leone, 1986, p. 99-100) (Vila & Morris, 1997, p.223). Throughout the remainder of the study the execution rate dropped and the murder rate continued to increase. In 1981 the murder rate was at 22,520 a ...
    Related: capital murder, capital punishment, punishment, first year, african american
  • Aids In Detail - 2,050 words
    AIDS In Detail Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Today, despite the continuing production of better antibiotics since the discovery of penicillin, we are facing an infectious disease against which all these drugs are virtually powerless. This disease is spreading inexorably, killing more people and more people each year. AIDS does not know no national boundaries and does not discriminate by race or sex. It is rampaging not only throughout the United States, but also through Africa, India, China, Russia, Europe, South America, and the Caribbean countries. Even infants and children are at risk. AIDS is similar to the bubonic plague or the "BLACK DEATH" that killed perhaps one-third in ...
    Related: aids, aids epidemic, infectious disease, human immunodeficiency, purple
  • Alcatraz Island And Prison - 1,993 words
    Alcatraz Island And Prison Alcatraz Island has quite a distinct history. Many people know that Alcatraz served as a federal prison, but most are reluctant to know that this island served as fort. Built before the Civil War, it served two main purposes. First, that it was to guard the San Francisco bay area from enemy ships against a foreign invasion, and second, to hold hostage prisoners of war or POW's as they were called. In this report, I'll show you how this fortress came to be a federal prison, why it is no longer in operation today, and most importantly, to show why it was built in the first place. When the great Gold Rush of 1849 first started, California grew from what would be consi ...
    Related: alcatraz, federal prison, military prison, prison population, state prison
  • Alcatraz Island And Prison - 2,035 words
    ... rcumvented the San Francisco citizens who were concerned at the prospect of vicious criminals in the near vicinity, the Bureau of Prisons set about selecting a warden who could do the job. A well-organized, no-nonsense businessman and prison administrator with twelve years of experience in the California Department of Corrections, James A. Johnston was to be that man. Johnston had retired at the time of his appointment by the Department of Justice, and its acceptance resulted in his serving as warden of Alcatraz for the next fourteen years. Classified as a concentration model, where difficult-to-manage prisoners from other institutions would be concentrated under one roof, Alcatraz serve ...
    Related: alcatraz, federal prison, prison officials, prison system, good idea
  • Antigone - 1,052 words
    Antigone After filling up your gas-guzzling SUV, you walk into the convenience store to pay for the gas and buy a soda. Reaching for the Diet Coke, your eye catches on something as a man walks past you. It is a shine, or a shimmer. Just the light bouncing off the keys, you think. You grab the soda and shut the door that is now fogged up due to the warm air. As you turn around, chaos breaks through the quiet, and everybody is leaping for the ground. Quite puzzled, you just stand there, looking at everybody, wondering what the hell is going on. And then you see it. The man that walked by you has a gun in his hands and is waving it around like a baton. Fortunately, he hasnt seen you standing du ...
    Related: antigone, death sentence, diet coke, true meaning, uncle
  • Antigone And Creon - 1,144 words
    Antigone And Creon Issue of male authority and challenges to that authority in the play "Antigone". In the play "Antigone" by Sophocles, Creon and Antigone have distinct conflicting values. Antigone first demonstrates feminist logic when she chooses to challenge a powerful male establishment. This establishment is personified by her uncle Creon, who is newly crowned as the King of Thebes. Creon poses to be a major authority figure in a patriarchal society. Creon's regard for the laws of the city causes him to abandon all other beliefs. He feels that all should obey the laws set forth by him, even if other beliefs, moral or religious, state otherwise. Antigone, on the other hand, holds the be ...
    Related: antigone, creon, sophocles antigone, death sentence, first person
  • Antigone And Power - 1,613 words
    Antigone And Power "Power corrupts, and absolute power corrupts absolutely," said Lord Acton generations ago. In the Greek tragedy Antigone, written by Sophocles, there was a character named Kreon, the antagonist, who was the king of Thebes. Thebes was an autocratic state where Kreon had absolute power. Throughout the course of the play, Kreon abused his privilege of absolute power; and this caused him to suffer greatly, even though he was warned by a few people of his bad deeds. What Sophocles commented on absolute power was that one should not abuse it. If it was abused, he or she had to expect bad consequences. This was indicated by what happened to Kreon when he abused his power. Kreon s ...
    Related: antigone, greek tragedy, death penalty, most high, collapse
  • Antigone By Sophocles - 1,163 words
    Antigone By Sophocles Name: Nilima R. Patel Student Number: 9714937 T.A.: Nanette Morton Professor: Anne Milne. Date: 26th July, 2000. Issue of male authority and challenges to that authority in the play Antigone. In the play Antigone by Sophocles, Creon and Antigone have distinct conflicting values. Antigone first demonstrates feminist logic when she chooses to challenge a powerful male establishment. This establishment is personified by her uncle Creon, who is newly crowned as the King of Thebes. Creon poses to be a major authority figure in a patriarchal society. Creon's regard for the laws of the city causes him to abandon all other beliefs. He feels that all should obey the laws set for ...
    Related: antigone, sophocles, sophocles antigone, first person, point of view
  • Aristotle - 445 words
    Aristotle Aristotle was one of the most influential thinkers in western culture, and a Greek philosopher, teacher, and scientist. He was probably the most scholarly and learned of the ancient Greek Philosophers. Aristotle mastered the entire development of Greek though before him and employed this knowledge in his writings. He criticized, summarized, and furthered the development of the Greek philosophies. Aristotle, along with his teacher Plato, are the two most important Greek Philosophers. Aristotle was born in Satagira, a small town in Greece. Aristotles father worked as a personal physician for the grandfather of Alexander The Great. Both of Aristotles parents died when he was a boy, he ...
    Related: aristotle, modern christian, western culture, early stages, purge
  • Born In Florence, Italy In 1469, Niccol Machiavelli Was The First Great Political Philosopher Of The Renaissance Once A Burea - 954 words
    Born in Florence, Italy in 1469, Niccol Machiavelli was the first great political philosopher of the Renaissance. Once a bureaucrat and diplomat for the state of Florence, he was removed from office when the Medici family was restored to power in 1512. He retired to his country home where he, among other works, penned The Prince, a work which has become a political handbook for modern day politicians as well as for those who desire power--whether it be on Wall Street, through corporate conglomerates, or in their personal relationships. The Prince is a philosophical political view on how one might gain, maintain, and expand the power over the state or states in which a ruler has authority. Wh ...
    Related: first great, florence italy, italy, machiavelli, niccolo machiavelli, philosopher, renaissance
  • Caligula: The Madness Of A Goat - 1,117 words
    Caligula: The Madness of a Goat Many studies have been made on the emperor Gaius Caesar Augustus Germanicus, or "Caligula." He was professed to be the maddest, and cruelest of all Roman emperors. As emperor, Caligula put the imperial treasury in severe debt, performed acts of insanity, and committed scandalous sexual acts. The ludicrous deeds he participated in, and carried out left the Roman Empire in infamy. During the reign of Tiberius, the captain of his bodyguards Sejanus began a campaign of extreme and devious means. He desired the Roman throne and so, started to eliminate his competition. The first to go was Drusus, Tiberiuss heir. Sejanus then took out other key contenders for the th ...
    Related: goat, madness, julius caesar, roman empire, costly
  • Capital Puinishment - 1,606 words
    Capital Puinishment Capital Punishment is an Unlawful and Ineffective Deterrent to Murder The United States is one of the few countries left in the world to practice the savage and immoral punishment of death. Retentionists argue that the consequence of death prevents people from committing the crime of murder. It is proven that the death penalty does not deter persons from committing murder, nor does it serve as an example of the consequences of capital crimes to society. Furthermore, it is impossible to guarantee that the criminal justice system will not discriminate against or execute the innocent. Above all, the methods of execution are horrifying and barbaric, as well as the devaluing o ...
    Related: capital punishment, supreme court, national coalition, criminal behavior, coalition
  • Capital Puinishment - 1,670 words
    ... fers. The methods of capital punishment in use in 1997 included hanging, firing squad, electrocution, suffocation in the lethal gas chamber, and lethal injection (NCADP). The traditional execution by hanging is still used in a few states today. Death on the gallows can make for a slow and agonizing demise by strangulation if the drop is too short. Or, if the drop is too long, the head will be torn off. Two states still use the firing squad method, in which the condemned is hooded, strapped into a chair, and a target is pinned on the chest. Five marksmen take aim and fire (NCADP). During the twentieth century, electrocution has been the most widely applied form of execution in the United ...
    Related: capital punishment, albert camus, human life, violent crime, intensity
  • Capital Punishment - 713 words
    Capital Punishment Capital Punishment Capital punishment is punishment by death for committing a crime. Since the early 1800's, most executions have resulted from convictions for murder. The death penalty has also been imposed for other serious crimes such as armed robbery, kidnapping, rape and treason. People disagree about whether capital punishment is moral or is effective in discouraging crime. Questions that are most often argued when discussing capital punishment fall into three categories: Does capital punishment save money? Does capital punishment strike fear into offenders, saving innocent lives by deterring would-be killers? What does capital punishment mean to an innocent person w ...
    Related: capital punishment, punishment, serious concern, criminal justice, robbery
  • Capital Punishment - 1,271 words
    Capital Punishment Martin Ferretti 3/5/00 Capital Punishment Capital punishment was established in this country many years ago to punish those members of society which have committed horrendous crimes against fellow citizens and in a way to give the family of the victims a sense of peace. Various forms of capital and corporal punishment exist around the world and in most cases are very closely related to the religion of the nation. I believe that capital punishment is an atrocious institution and should only be used in those very few cases where rehabilitation is not an option because it does not help the criminal become a member of society. It should be used only for those who kill just for ...
    Related: capital punishment, corporal punishment, punishment, luther king, rights movement
  • Capital Punishment - 1,067 words
    Capital Punishment ?The?Capital punishment is the infliction of the death penalty on persons convicted of a crime.? This has been a topic of debate for many years. People who are for: People who are against: ?Why do we kill people to prove killing people is wrong?? Unconstitutional The 1st argument I have against capital punishment is that it?s unconstitutional. Every person has an equal right to ?life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.? This is a quote from American Civil Liberty Union National Office, ?Capital punishment is a barbaric remnant of an uncivilized society. It is immoral in principle, and unfair and discriminatory in practice.? Does the government have the right to kill? M ...
    Related: capital punishment, punishment, last year, civil liberty, sink
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