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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: algerian

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  • Absurd - 1,347 words
    Absurd Theatre Influences on Theatre of the Absurd Big feet, stampeding rhinoceroses, and barren sets are typical of the theatre of the absurd. The dramatic content, symbolism, and spectacles are an amazing thing to see and an impossibility to comprehend. The philosophy of the absurd and the dawn of mankind influenced these plays in the twentieth century. The main proponents and works of the theater of the absurd and philosophy were influenced by the chaotic actions of the early and mid-twentieth century. These chaotic actions led them to search for something in literature and drama never seen before. A brief survey of the main proponents and works of the absurd philosophy and theater can le ...
    Related: absurd, human life, north africa, political power, cycle
  • Arthur Miller And Tennessee Williams, Including A Streetcar Named Desire - 4,269 words
    ... g the subject matter of Face to Face (1975) overly familiar and rating his English-language The Serpent's Egg (1977) an overall failure. Autumn Sonata (1978) and From the Life of the Marionettes (1980) were critical successes, however, although the latter failed at the box office. Fanny and Alexander (1983), a rich and fantastic portrait of childhood in a theatrical family, was regarded as one of his finest films and won an Academy Award for best foreign language film of 1983. Subsequently, Bergman directed After the Rehearsal (1984), his meditation on a life in the theater. WILLIAM S. PECHTER Bibliography: Bergman, Ingmar, Bergman on Bergman (1973); Cowie, Peter, Ingmar Bergman: A Criti ...
    Related: arthur, arthur miller, miller, named desire, streetcar, streetcar named, streetcar named desire
  • Ask Most Americans Who Jeanpaul Sartre Is And You Will Most Likely Get A Frowned Look According To Journalist, Richard Eyre, - 750 words
    Ask most Americans who Jean-Paul Sartre is and you will most likely get a frowned look. According to journalist, Richard Eyre, in this country, Sartre is perhaps as unfashionable as loon pants. That is in part because Sartre, albeit a great French philosopher, didnt have a poster status. Sartre was not a particularly attractive man and although he was the darling of the 60s in all of Europe, his pipe, glasses and an air of bad temper kept him off walls that celebrated the Brigitte Bardots and the James Deans. Furthermore, Sartre was not always an easy man to understand. His writings are not particularly fanciful and he doesnt necessarily care to engage the reader by painting pretty pictures ...
    Related: jean paul sartre, jean-paul sartre, paul sartre, sartre, no exit
  • Lifes Tragedies - 879 words
    Lifes Tragedies I had always believed that suicide was only in the movies. Two summers ago I realized that it could happen in real life. I had a mutual friend his name was Rick. He was a smart and good-looking boy who seemed to have it all. His parents were two of the nicest people that I have ever met. They had a healthy marriage, good jobs, and a nice home. They always provided Rick with anything he needed or wanted. Rick had a girlfriend named Jamie and a lot of friends. He was also supposed to attend the University of Pittsburgh in the fall of 1997. Something was obviously missing in his life because it ended abruptly one night after a going away party for him. He went upstairs and took ...
    Related: real life, best friend, the manager, english teacher, algerian
  • Meursault - 1,411 words
    Meursault Meursault is a man who will not lie to himself. He will not feign emotion, nor use religion as a vehicle to give his life meaning. Meursault has a passion for the truth, which opens the revelation for all humanity: life is absurd; it is mans mortal responsibility to be committed to himself, for death is absolute and inevitable. In Albert Camus The Stranger, his behavior and characteristics display him as an immoral man, expressing indifference towards societys formulas for normalcy. The lack of emotion Mersault has concerning the death of his mother is an excellent portrayal of his beast-like, immoral character. Meursault defies the customary code of behavior by refusing to see his ...
    Related: meursault, life after death, self defense, albert camus, communal
  • Meursault By Albert Camus - 1,192 words
    Meursault By Albert Camus Testing the Boundaries of Algerian Conventional Society In this essay, I am going to explore Albert Camus use of Meursaults murder trial in The Stranger to note the absurdity of the defined social behavior in Algeria while forcing the reader to evaluate his or her own morality. Camus asks the reader to form a mental and emotional relationship with Meursault through the descriptive and, in the end, destructively honest narrative. He then asks the reader to depend not on the law, which in this novel represents conventional social behavior, but on this newfound relationship to decide Meursault fate. Camus introduction of Meursault uses straightforward and very honest l ...
    Related: albert, albert camus, camus, meursault, self awareness
  • Middle Ages - 809 words
    Middle Ages The Christian Crusades Positively Impacted the East and the West Even though countless numbers of people died during the Christian Crusades, there were many positive effects for both the East and the West. After the Crusades halted, various trade routes opened up between Eastern and Western cities. Also, the Muslims developed new military strategies and techniques during the fights with the Europeans, and they united themselves against one cause, producing a stronger religious nation (Encyclopdia Britannica, 1993). Numerous effects of the Christian Crusades in the Middle East had a positive outcome. In John Child's book, The Crusades, he quotes J. Kerr as claiming that the most o ...
    Related: middle ages, middle east, human anatomy, european history, beneficial
  • Nationalism - 1,977 words
    Nationalism The rise of nationalism was very important in Africa. The national patricians and the establishment during colonial times meant the lose of their gained power and influences all which had had until now. The status quo until now meant had supported the colonial powers to change the economy, culture and the way of life for Africans. Of course, Africans never accepted colonial rule and destruction of their customs. Paradoxically, colonialism resulted in an awareness of consciousness among all Africans; awareness of themselves as Africans, consciousness of being oppressed, exploited and humiliated. This common consciousness gave rise to nationalist feelings and eventually to a drive, ...
    Related: nationalism, political consciousness, natural resources, economic stability, apartheid
  • Sonnys Blues And Pauls Case - 1,212 words
    Sonny's Blues And Paul`s Case I think people ought to do what they want to do, what else are they alive for. (49) This thought is what is reflected in both Sonnys Blues by James Baldwin and Pauls Case by Willa Cather. Both Baldwin and Cather illustrate the problem of a young man growing up and taking on the responsibility of finding out who they are and what they want out of life. In these stories the theme is most prevalent, developing the story and helping the reader form their own opinions on how they feel about their own individuality. No matter how hard someone tries to decide someones life, it is up to the individual to decide what kind of life they want to live. In Sonnys Blues Sonny ...
    Related: blues, big brother, good life, high school, bought
  • Terrorism And Lethality - 1,804 words
    ... -ft wide crater six stories deep, and causing an estimated $550 million in both damages to the twin tower and in lost revenue to the business housed there31--as the more "high-tech" devices constructed out of military ordnance, with timing devices powered by computer micro-chips and detonated by sophisticated timing mechanisms used by their "professional" counterparts.32 "Professional" Terrorists Finally, while on the one hand terrorism is attracting "amateurs," on the other hand the sophistication and operational competence of the "professional" terrorists is also increasing. These "professionals" are becoming demonstrably more adept in their trade craft of death and destruction; more f ...
    Related: international terrorism, terrorism, terrorist group, coercive power, adept
  • The Plague - 1,703 words
    The Plague SSUMMARY: PART 1 The first part of The Plague, by Albert Camus, begins in describing the large French port called Oran which is on the Algerian coast of Africa. The smug town is inhibited by people largely concerned with business. The normal flow of the town is abruptly interrupted by thousands of rats coming out of the sewers and dying. The concerned town people are delighted to find an end to the disgusting rats, but are then faced with a more severer problem. A fatal fever has swept the town. It takes government officials quite a while, but a state of plague is proclaimed. A doctor by the name of Dr. Bernard Rieux, who was recently separated from his wife due to another illness ...
    Related: plague, in exile, nazi party, albert camus, concierge
  • The Plague Novel Analysis - 987 words
    The Plague - Novel Analysis The Epidemic in a Few Pages The Plague is a novel describing the plague epidemic in the large Algerian city of Oran in the 1940s. In April, numerous rats staggered into the open to die. Once a mild hysteria gripped the population, the newspapers began searching for any action they could take. Finally, the authorities arranged for the daily collection and cremation of the rats, but by mid-afternoon they were already pilling up again. When a cluster of cases of a strange fever appeared, Dr. Rieux's partner, Castel, became certain that the illness is the bubonic plague. He and Dr. Rieux are forced to confront the indifference and denial of the authorities and other d ...
    Related: bubonic plague, novel analysis, plague, social responsibility, different stages
  • The Plague Novel Analysis - 1,032 words
    ... eplied, There werent no rats in the building, so someone must have brought this one from outside. (page 7) These dead rats truly symbolize the plague being spread from one unexpecting place to another before the people had even begun to worry. As the death number continued to rise, a telegram was sent from the Prefect that read, Proclaim a state of plague stop close town. (page 61) Even though this was the only means to be taken by the authorities, it shows that the people are giving up the battle against the plague and they are trying to fence in the disease and the people. One could read into this that the authorities have decided to sacrifice the unlucky people of Oran. This state of ...
    Related: novel analysis, plague, second paragraph, character building, singing
  • The Spain Cervantes Lived In - 1,651 words
    The Spain Cervantes Lived In The Spain Cervantes Lived In Miguel De Cervantes Saavedra, writer of the world famous novel Don Quixote, was born in Spain in 1547. He was the son of a practical doctor, and although they were hidalgos, a title of lesser nobility, they were relatively poor. Cervantes' life can be described as somewhat chaotic. Coincidentally, the time period when he was alive was also considered chaotic in Europe, and particularly in Spain. Europe as a whole was going through the Renaissance, bringing about change in every aspect of life. In Spain, Charles V, was king. He divided his kingdom and gave Spain to his son Philip. Philip later married Mary of Tudor, and so he was brief ...
    Related: cervantes, miguel de cervantes, spain, spanish crown, charles v
  • The Wretched Of The Earth - 746 words
    The Wretched Of The Earth Fanon's book, "The Wretched Of The Earth" like Foucault's "Discipline and Punish" question the basic assumptions that underlie society. Both books writers come from vastly different perspectives and this shapes what both authors see as the technologies that keep the populace in line. Foucault coming out of the French intellectual class sees technologies as prisons, family, mental institutions, and other institutions and cultural traits of French society. In contrast Frantz Fanon (1925-1961) born in Martinique into a lower middle class family of mixed race ancestry and receiving a conventional colonial education sees the technologies of control as being the white col ...
    Related: frantz fanon, advisory council, american studies, american, council
  • Wretched Of The Earth - 745 words
    Wretched Of The Earth Fanon's book, "The Wretched Of The Earth" like Foucault's "Discipline and Punish" question the basic assumptions that underlie society. Both books writers come from vastly different perspectives and this shapes what both authors see as the technologies that keep the populace in line. Foucault coming out of the French intellectual class sees technologies as prisons, family, mental institutions, and other institutions and cultural traits of French society. In contrast Frantz Fanon (1925-1961) born in Martinique into a lower middle class family of mixed race ancestry and receiving a conventional colonial education sees the technologies of control as being the white colonis ...
    Related: middle class, african american, frantz fanon, colonists, newton
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