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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: david hume

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  • David Hume - 1,044 words
    David Hume What Came First: The Chicken or the Egg? David Hume moves through a logical progression of the ideas behind cause and effect. He critically analyzes the reasons behind those generally accepted ideas. Though the relation of cause and effect seems to be completely logical and based on common sense, he discusses our impressions and ideas and why they are believed. Hume's progression, starting with his initial definition of cause, to his final conclusion in his doctrine on causality. As a result, it proves how Hume's argument on causality follows the same path as his epistemology, with the two ideas complimenting each other so that it is rationally impossible to accept the epistemolog ...
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  • David Hume - 1,013 words
    ... " (165). There are two ultimate definitions of causality that Hume finally reaches. He sees them as either an object precedent and contiguous to another, where all the objects resembling the former are placed in a like relation of priority and contiguity to those objects that resemble the latter. The other definition can be seen as an object precedent and contiguous to another, and so united with it in the imagination, that the idea of the one determines the mind to form the idea of the other, and the impression of the one to form a more lively idea of the other. Hume sees the second definition of cause as being more accurate. The precedent and contiguous object seems to cause the effect ...
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  • David Hume - 772 words
    David Hume I would like to start by stating that the arguments I will present about David Humes "An Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding" are not going to be leaning completely towards his point of view or against it due to the fact that I agree with certain views on his philosophy and disagree with others. In "Of the Origin of Ideas", Hume divides all perceptions into two basic kinds: impressions, which are the "livelier" and "more vivid" perceptions; and ideas, which are "less lively" copies of the original impression. He gives some excellent analogies to back this up. For example, he says "when we think of a golden mountain, we only join two consistent ideas, gold, and mountain, with wh ...
    Related: david, david hume, hume, concerning human, point of view
  • David Hume - 2,175 words
    David Hume "I was from the beginning scandalised, I must own, with this resemblance between the Deity and human creatures." --Philo David Hume wrote much about the subject of religion, much of it negative. In this paper we shall attempt to follow Hume's arguments against Deism as Someone knowable from the wake He allegedly makes as He passes. This kind of Deism he lays to rest. Then, digging deeper, we shall try our hand at a critique of his critique of religion, of resurrecting a natural belief in God. Finally, if there's anything Hume would like to say as a final rejoinder, we shall let him have his last word and call the matter closed. To allege the occurrence of order in creation, purpos ...
    Related: david, david hume, hume, philosophy of religion, present state
  • David Hume - 772 words
    David Hume I would like to start by stating that the arguments I will present about David Humes "An Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding" are not going to be leaning completely towards his point of view or against it due to the fact that I agree with certain views on his philosophy and disagree with others. In "Of the Origin of Ideas", Hume divides all perceptions into two basic kinds: impressions, which are the "livelier" and "more vivid" perceptions; and ideas, which are "less lively" copies of the original impression. He gives some excellent analogies to back this up. For example, he says "when we think of a golden mountain, we only join two consistent ideas, gold, and mountain, with wh ...
    Related: david, david hume, hume, human understanding, cause and effect
  • Of Suicide By David Hume, Analysis - 1,221 words
    Of Suicide By David Hume, Analysis "Of Suicide" by David Hume Analysis "I believe that no man ever threw away life, while it was worth keeping." In David Hume's essay "Of Suicide," the philosophical argument of justified suicide is pursued. However, the underlying argument focuses on the injustification of the government and society condemning and forbidding such an action and the creation of superstitions and falsehoods of religion and God. Hume argues that the last phases that a person goes through before taking his life is those of "disorder, weakness, insensibility, and stupidity," and that those traits, when obvious to the mind, doom him to a death by his own decision. He states that no ...
    Related: david, david hume, suicide, worth living, the lottery
  • Cosmogony - 1,112 words
    Cosmogony What is cosmogony? Cosmogony can be defined as a study of the physical universe in terms of its originating time and space. In other words, cosmogony is the study of the universe and its origins. The origin and the nature of the universe have been one of the most debated topics throughout history. Both the scientific and theological communities have yet to ascertain a common ground on how the universe came into being and whether it was an act of "God" or merely a spontaneous and random phenomenon. New discoveries in the scientific world provide new viewpoints on the creation of the universe and its relevance to a supreme intelligent "Creator." Due to mankind's constantly changing p ...
    Related: cosmogony, human experience, david hume, thomas aquinas, contribute
  • Cosmogony - 1,060 words
    ... ot know anything about God or the creation of the universe. The acknowledgement of different religious viewpoints, the establishment of the agnostic position, and the use of the empiricist principle, are new ideas used in the argument for the origin of the universe. The 18th century Enlightenment values are highly evident in Hume's text. It is obvious how the 13th century argument presented by Aquinas has changed in order to accommodate the new viewpoints available in the 18th century. Through the analysis of Hume's work, and put in comparison with earlier views, the development of the argument for the origin of the universe is easily identifiable. John F. Haught in Science and Religion: ...
    Related: cosmogony, changing nature, point of view, big bang theory, mediate
  • Egoism Ethics - 1,866 words
    Egoism Ethics In ethics egoism entails that the individual self is either the motivating moral force and is, or should, be the end of moral action. Egoism divides into both a positive and normative ethic. The positive ethic views egoism as a factual description of human affairs, that is people are motivated by their own interests and desires. The normative ethic is that they should be so motivated. Positivist egoism: Psychological Egoism The positivist egoist, whose theory is called psychological egoism, offers an explanation of human affairs, in effect a description of human nature, which he or she believes to be wholly self-centred and self-motivated. In its strong form the theory asserts ...
    Related: egoism, ethics, more successful, enquiry concerning, logically
  • Emma - 1,189 words
    Emma Of Jane Austen Jane Austens Emma and the Romantic Imagination "To see a world in a grain of sand And a heaven in a wild flower Hold infinity in the palm of your hand And eternity in an hour." William Blake, Auguries of Innocence Imagination, to the people of the eighteenth century of whom William Blake and Jane Austen are but two, involves the twisting of the relationship between fantasy and reality to arrive at a fantastical point at which a world can be extrapolated from a single grain of sand, and all the time that has been and ever will be can be compressed into the space of an hour. What is proposed by Blake is clearly ludicrousit runs against the very tide of reason and senseand y ...
    Related: emma, emma woodhouse, eighteenth century, oxford university press, hume
  • Enlightenment Of 18th Century - 1,604 words
    Enlightenment Of 18th Century The enlightenment was a great time of change in both Europe and America. Some of the biggest changes, however, happened in the minds of many and in the writings of many philosophers. These included some of the beliefs of David Hume, Jean Jacques Rousseau, Immanuel Kant, and Francois Voltaire. Writers during this time focused on optimism, which is the opinion to do everything for the best (Chaney 119), and the best for these philosophers was to stretch the minds of the ordinary. David Hume was Scottish and was born on April 26, 1711 and died in 1776. He states that he was not born into a rich family and was born into the Calvinist Presbyterian Church. However, af ...
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  • Enlightenment Of 18th Century - 905 words
    Enlightenment Of 18th Century The Enlightenment is a name given by historians to an intellectual movement that was predominant in the Western world during the 18th century. Strongly influenced by the rise of modern science and by the aftermath of the long religious conflict that followed the Reformation, the thinkers of the Enlightenment (called philosophers in France) were committed to secular views based on reason or human understanding only, which they hoped would provide a basis for beneficial changes affecting every area of life and thought. The more extreme and radical philosophes--Denis Diderot, Claude Adrien Helvetius, Baron d'Holbach, the Marquis de Condorcet, and Julien Offroy de L ...
    Related: enlightenment, jeremy bentham, modern social, human understanding, jean
  • For A Genuine Empiricist The Phrase God Exists Is Meaningless - 1,528 words
    ... ng of the question, a few key concepts must first be established. What is meant by the term Empiricism? To an empiricist, the occurrence of consciousness is simply the product of experience. It is assumed that all human knowledge is acquired from experience and observation alone. It is believed that we are born with an empty slate; it is through sense perception that our knowledge begins to form and shape our mind. Empiricism is against the idea of spontaneous or a priori thought (knowledge that is independent of all particular experience). They believe in a posteriori knowledge, which is derives from experience alone. The belief opposing Empiricism is that of Rationalism. In this philos ...
    Related: genuine, meaningless, phrase, concerning human, gods existence
  • Functionalism Conflict Theory And Symbolic Interaction - 548 words
    Functionalism Conflict Theory and Symbolic Interaction The functionalist thoery can be traced to a movement in the late nineteenth-century under the influences of Darwinism on the biological and social sciences. It is an attempt to understand the world, and it tests the cause and effect of sociological behavior. Some of the more famous functionalists are Charles Darwin, Emile Durkheim, and Horace Kallen. Horace Kallen's article in the article in the Encyclopedia of the Social Sciences, states that functionalism has influenced every discipline. In psychology, it led to the substitution of the stream of consciousness for states of mind. In philosophy, it led to the rise of pragmatism and instr ...
    Related: conflict theory, functionalism, interaction, sociological theory, symbolic, symbolic interaction
  • George Berkley: His View Of God - 1,262 words
    George Berkley: His View Of God George Berkeley: His View of God As man progressed through the various stages of evolution, it is assumed that at a certain point he began to ponder the world around him. Of course, these first attempts fell short of being scholarly, probably consisting of a few grunts and snorts at best. As time passed on, though, these ideas persisted and were eventually tackled by the more intellectual, so-called philosophers. Thus, excavation of the external world began. As the authoritarinism of the ancients gave way to the more liberal views of the modernists, two main positions concerning epistemology and the nature of the world arose. The first view was exemplified by ...
    Related: george berkeley, john locke, david hume, david, perception
  • God Existence - 1,569 words
    God Existence In my life on this planet I have come to question many things that many take on as blind faith. We all know that someday we will physically die, Yet, we continuously deny the forces working inside ourselves which want to search out the true outcome of what may or may not come after death. Its far easier for humanity to accept that they will go on to a safe haven and be forgiven for all, rather than to question the existence of a super omnipotent being. Fortunately, there are some of us who tend to question the whys and hows that come before us. We question the creation of humanity and the religious teachings received from our parents, our church and our society. This paper exam ...
    Related: existence of god, gods existence, cause and effect, the bible, stating
  • Human Understanding - 821 words
    Human Understanding In the history of human understanding, I couldn't think of any person to study for a singular perspective of gaining knowledge through philosophy. I am glad that the class has been given two philosophers to compare and contrast their ideas. The subject of human understanding is a wide range of ideas to discuss, which can be quite complex, a feat I would never return to do. The two philosophers Rene Descartes and David Hume take the task of discussing human understanding and bring it to the terms in which people can better understand. I say this because in the common people take for granted what we learn to be the truth instead of questioning its existence to be true. The ...
    Related: human mind, human understanding, math problem, mathematical formula, precedent
  • Hume - 2,176 words
    Hume "I was from the beginning scandalised, I must own, with this resemblance between the Deity and human creatures." --Philo David Hume wrote much about the subject of religion, much of it negative. In this paper we shall attempt to follow Hume's arguments against Deism as Someone knowable from the wake He allegedly makes as He passes. This kind of Deism he lays to rest. Then, digging deeper, we shall try our hand at a critique of his critique of religion, of resurrecting a natural belief in God. Finally, if there's anything Hume would like to say as a final rejoinder, we shall let him have his last word and call the matter closed. To allege the occurrence of order in creation, purpose in i ...
    Related: david hume, hume, natural religion, empirical study, refer
  • Hume - 2,176 words
    Hume "I was from the beginning scandalised, I must own, with this resemblance between the Deity and human creatures." --Philo David Hume wrote much about the subject of religion, much of it negative. In this paper we shall attempt to follow Hume's arguments against Deism as Someone knowable from the wake He allegedly makes as He passes. This kind of Deism he lays to rest. Then, digging deeper, we shall try our hand at a critique of his critique of religion, of resurrecting a natural belief in God. Finally, if there's anything Hume would like to say as a final rejoinder, we shall let him have his last word and call the matter closed. To allege the occurrence of order in creation, purpose in i ...
    Related: david hume, hume, design argument, present state, remove
  • Hume - 2,176 words
    Hume "I was from the beginning scandalised, I must own, with this resemblance between the Deity and human creatures." --Philo David Hume wrote much about the subject of religion, much of it negative. In this paper we shall attempt to follow Hume's arguments against Deism as Someone knowable from the wake He allegedly makes as He passes. This kind of Deism he lays to rest. Then, digging deeper, we shall try our hand at a critique of his critique of religion, of resurrecting a natural belief in God. Finally, if there's anything Hume would like to say as a final rejoinder, we shall let him have his last word and call the matter closed. To allege the occurrence of order in creation, purpose in i ...
    Related: david hume, hume, last word, human nature, occurrence
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