Live chat

Research paper topics, free example research papers

Free research papers and essays on topics related to: current state

  • 68 results found, view research papers on page:
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • >>>
  • The Current State Of Devlopment In Latin America - 1,982 words
    The Current State Of Devlopment In Latin America In attempting to establish the current state of development in Latin America, historical chronology serves as the foundation necessary for a comprehensively logical position. Latin American development has evolved in distinct phases, which lead to the present day standings of the politics and peoples throughout the region. The culmination of distinct historical attributes: conquest, colonialism, mercantilism, captalism, industrialism, and globalism, serve as the developmental path from the past, to allow an understanding of the current state of development. In overview of this, as perceived by Latin American governments, the four primary areas ...
    Related: america, current state, latin, latin america, latin american
  • The Current State Of Devlopment In Latin America - 2,015 words
    ... few indigenous peoples that survived the plague of disease brought on by the Europeans. So began the complex social stratifications embodied within every facet of culture and politics. With the defeat of the Spanish Armada, symbolically the power of Spain was diminishing and thus, the ambitions of the colonies were increasing. Charles III was the last in a succession of rulers, which attempted to consolidate control over the colonies. This was attempted by both re-designing the administrative system governing the colonies and allowing free trade to occur from any of the ports to Spain, as contained in, the Declaration of Free Trade. The unsatisfied colonies were finally forced to loose a ...
    Related: america, central america, current state, latin, latin america, latin american
  • 1954 - 1,704 words
    1954 In the year 1954, the United States was changing rapidly. President Eisenhower, a Republican, was in the midst of his first term. Eisenhower had just announced to the world that the United States had in fact developed and successfully tested the first hydrogen bomb some two years prior. Mamie Eisenhower christened the Nautilus, which was the first submarine to run on nuclear power. The great court decision, Brown vs. the Board of Education, called for the integration of the countrys public schools. Arkansas and Alabama refused to integrate and President Eisenhower was forced to send the 101st Airborne Division to integrate the schools of these states. The phrase Under God was added to t ...
    Related: washington monument, new zealand, southeast asia, emotion, police
  • Spending Financed Not By Current Tax Receipts, But By - 1,531 words
    "Spending financed not by current tax receipts, but by borrowing or drawing upon past tax reserves." , Is it a good idea? Why does the U.S. run a deficit? Since 1980 the deficit has grown enormously. Some say its a bad thing, and predict impending doom, others say it is a safe and stable necessity to maintain a healthy economy. When the U.S. government came into existence and for about a 150 years thereafter the government managed to keep a balanced budget. The only times a budget deficit existed during these first 150 years were in times of war or other catastrophic events. The Government, for instance, generated deficits during the War of 1812, the recession of 1837, the Civil War, the dep ...
    Related: current state, current status, defense spending, federal spending, spending
  • A Difficult Century Forming Of The World Government - 1,887 words
    A Difficult Century - Forming Of The World Government According to Held, Today, the mechanisms we have for enforcing international law depend too much on whether a powerful geo-political force such as the U.S. is willing to commit resources to the problem. In such a situation, a big state will likely do what it desires, acting in its own interests. Recent developments in Kosovo, Chechnya, Iran and other states in some kind of a conflict have just proven the above statement. Presently the most important developments in international law and relations between states are, almost exclusively, dictated by the Great Powers. The General Assembly of the UN is probably the only part of UN that repres ...
    Related: forming, world government, biggest challenge, economic cooperation, spreading
  • A View Of Modern Societ - 763 words
    A View Of Modern Societ I wrote this to try and take the reader on a journey. What you read here is a direct reflection of the current state of our society. I want to point out to you, the reader, exactly what is happening in the undercurrents of the digital frontier. Each image and video clip that you witness is part of the greater whole of the new Internet society that we all live in. It is your voice that has made this view popular. We are all fed up with the bland and tasteless media that is shoved down our collective throats day after day. When you go outside and see a billboard for GAP clothing or SONY consumer devices you may not realize that you are being programmed with each glance. ...
    Related: university school, mass communication, current state, sony, frontier
  • Age Of The Bosses - 455 words
    Age Of The Bosses As industrialization caused cites to grow in leaps and bounds, political bosses started to take power. As the 19th Century came to a close, almost every sizable city had a political boss, or at least had one rising to power. Tons of immigrants from every part of the world began to pour into the major cities. Cities have had diversity in the past, but the huge diversity of the American cities was unique. The only thing the new immigrants had in common with each other was the dream of becoming rich and the poverty of their current state. Unfortunately, so many different people with so little in common often left tension between different groups on the edge of becoming violent ...
    Related: bosses, municipal government, public education, middle class, loose
  • An Unexamind Life Is Not Worth Living - 935 words
    AN UNEXAMIND LIFE IS NOT WORTH LIVING The unexamined life is not worth living. (Apology, p. 41) Socrates held him self up to this standard by allowing the courts to take his life because they would not allow him to continue his quest set forth by the Oracle. An unexamined life would be just coasting through and not making any decisions or asking any questions. Socrates could not see a point in living if you were unable to ask questions and challenge your way of thinking. An examined life would be trying to understand your purpose and the current state of things. By examining your life, therefore understanding yourself, you will not be subject to actions motivated by passion or instinct. Socr ...
    Related: unexamined life, worth living, current state, dear friend, apology
  • Boot Camps - 1,983 words
    ... e said, should be considered when designing any program for youth: Adolescents are fairness fanatics. Running any adolescent group care program is difficult because adolescents are very sensitive to anything they perceive as unfair, particularly anything that applies to the whole group. Adolescents reject imposed structure and assistance. Adolescents respond to encouragement, not punishment. Although they may change their behavior to avoid punishment, their attitudes and behaviors do not change in response to punishment (Andrews, 1990). The implications of these three factors are that youth will defend themselves against what they see as unfair, regardless of the motivation of the adults ...
    Related: boot, boot camps, juvenile court, support system, rehabilitation
  • Brave New World Eugenics - 903 words
    Brave New World - Eugenics In chapter II of a Brave New World Revisited by Aldous Huxley, Huxley makes some very bold statements on the current state of our nations increasing technology towards medicine. This leads to the formation of the idea that we need to institute a eugenics program. Though there are many drawbacks in using eugenics, the ultimate goal is very beneficial. Huxley gives a very clear example on why we need a system like eugenics when he states an example which involves introducing a cure for malaria to a tropical island. Suppose someone was to go to a tropical island with DDT and wipe out malaria. After two or three years, hundreds of thousands of lives are saved. Though t ...
    Related: brave, brave new world, eugenics, world war ii, ultimate goal
  • Brisbane River - 1,955 words
    Brisbane River 1.0 INTRODUCTION The Brisbane River has flowed for over 400 million years. The catchment of the Brisbane River has overcome phases of flood and drought while its origins altered as the surrounding land changed overtime. In 1823, John Oxley entered the river for the first time. At the time the river appeared clean and unpolluted. Oxley immediately recognised the river's potential as a site for new settlement, through his recommendation the city of Brisbane was established in 1825. The Brisbane River extends inland for 300km reaching its source at the foothills of the Great Dividing Range. The river's catchment occupies an area of approximately 30,000km2 and releases it waters i ...
    Related: brisbane, river basin, central business, water quality, improving
  • Campaign Finance Reform - 362 words
    Campaign Finance Reform CAMPAIGN FINANCE REFORM The campaign finance system is corrupted. Spending is out of control, and there are various loopholes in federal campaign finance law. Money buys access and influence, which effectively causes the majority of Americans to have no real capacity to influence public policy. State and federal legislation is needed to fight corruption and unjust influence, to ensure the publics right to know where a candidates money comes from, to enable all candidates to compete equitably in elections, and to allow maximum citizen participation in the political process. Rock the Vote believes that the McCain-Feingold Campaign Finance Reform Bill, in its current sta ...
    Related: campaign, campaign finance, campaign finance reform, finance, reform
  • Cineplex: Case Study - 1,020 words
    Cineplex: Case Study Company Background In 1979 Garth Drabinsky and Nathan Taylor formed Cineplex. From early on Cineplex saw itself as a niche player. They used small screens to show specialty movies and they employed this strategy not to challenge major chains, but to compliment them. Cineplex did well primarily because of their concept for carefully planned use of shared facilities. With this success they began to expand across Canada with a very rapid rate of expansion. During this expansion however they amassed a 21 million-dollar debt. Also, distributors became reluctant to supply Cineplex for fear of alienating the two largest Canadian chains. In 1983 to avoid bankruptcy, Cineplex red ...
    Related: case study, motion picture, cost cutting, current ratio, taylor
  • Cosmology - 1,152 words
    Cosmology Cosmology has always been an interesting area of study for me. For as long as I can remember, every time I look up at the night sky, a million questions pop into my head. Questions such as "Is there an intelligent life out there?" "How large is space, does it expand infinitely, if it does, what does it expand into?" These and many other questions still plague my mind. We can define Cosmology as the study of the heavens as a whole, including theories about its origin, evolution, large-scale structure, and future. I would definitely agree to this description, and would like to explain my point of view of the topics that Cosmology covers. Personally, I tend to believe that the big ban ...
    Related: cosmology, free will, point of view, current state, notion
  • Deep Ecololgy - 1,844 words
    Deep Ecololgy Deep Ecology/Ecosophy The ideas behind deep ecology have major implications today. They allow people to think more profoundly about the environment and possibly come to a better understanding of their own meaning. People are intensely concerned about the worlds technological adolescence, massive consumerism, and overpopulation. A man named Arne Naess, former head of the philosophy department at the University of Oslo founded an idea that can direct peoples anxiety away from their shallow notion of the problem to one that is much deeper. Deep ecology goes beyond the limited piecemeal shallow approach to environmental problems and attempts to articulate a comprehensive religious ...
    Related: human life, wilderness areas, face value, outline, dependency
  • Deficit Spending - 1,533 words
    Deficit Spending "Spending financed not by current tax receipts, but by borrowing or drawing upon past tax reserves." , Is it a good idea? Why does the U.S. run a deficit? Since 1980 the deficit has grown enormously. Some say its a bad thing, and predict impending doom, others say it is a safe and stable necessity to maintain a healthy economy. When the U.S. government came into existence and for about a 150 years thereafter the government managed to keep a balanced budget. The only times a budget deficit existed during these first 150 years were in times of war or other catastrophic events. The Government, for instance, generated deficits during the War of 1812, the recession of 1837, the C ...
    Related: budget deficit, defense spending, deficit, federal spending, spending
  • Democratic Ecohumanism, Market Civilization - 1,376 words
    Democratic Eco-Humanism, Market Civilization In an effort to dramatize his neo-Polanyian critique of neo-liberal global capitalism, Stephen Gill questions the tenability of his own term market civilization, proposing it as oxymoronic in that a market civilization qua the neo-liberal order contradicts Gill's view of civilization qua democratic eco-humanism (i.e. representation, civility, social well-being and inclusion). In this formation, Gill's argument is essentially circular in its reliance on his own subjective standard of civilization, (democratic eco-humanism), to prove the uncivilized nature of the neo-liberal order. By adopting a more objective, (and necessarily more general), defini ...
    Related: civilization, market, third world, human interaction, planet
  • Descartes Cartesian Doubt - 2,352 words
    ... is first meditation, Descartes sets out with amazing clarity and persistence to clear himself of every false idea that he has acquired previous to this, and determine what he truly knows. To rid him of these "rotten apples" he has developed a method of doubt with a goal to construct a set of beliefs on foundations which are indubitable. On these foundations, Descartes applies three levels of skepticism, which in turn, generate three levels at which our thoughts may be deceived by error. Descartes states quite explicitly in the synopsis, that we can doubt all things which are material as long as "we have no foundations for the sciences other than those which we have had up till now"(synop ...
    Related: cartesian, descartes, sixth meditation, natural world, mirage
  • Elections - 1,478 words
    Elections Josh Grodin 410-37-8822 Second Take Home Essay #1 Early last year, shortly after the 2000 elections, the Distinguished Gentlemen, Lloyd Doggett announced that he would not seek reelection for his House seat in 2002. This revelation came as quite a shock to Doggett supporters, but it was a pleasant surprise to a well-known Texas Senator such as myself. Being a Democrat who is well liked and respected within the Texas Senate, it was a clear calling for me to throw in the towel and run for his position within the House of Representatives. Two months ago Texas held its primary for seats in the House, and after a long and hard fought battle, I procured the nomination of my party. The 20 ...
    Related: house of representatives, united states house, last year, socio, voter
  • Euthanasia - 1,301 words
    ... ermany upon the legalization of assisted suicide. The opposition also fears that more and more physicians will become insistent in their roles with assisted suicide, and begin to offer and urge it on patients who have become not only depressed about their circumstances, but also a burden to themselves and to others, even an economic burden. They also feel that the doctor-patient relationship depends solely on trust, and if the public begins to mistrust the profession of medicine, because its unhealthy participation in death-dealing, then the profession of medicine itself will suffer irreversible losses. They also see the potential for physicians having the ultimate power of life and deat ...
    Related: euthanasia, doctor patient relationship, physician assisted suicide, jack kevorkian, analyze
  • 68 results found, view research papers on page:
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • >>>