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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: cross cultural

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  • Cross Cultural Studies - 447 words
    Cross Cultural Studies Question: What is the value of making cross-cultural comparisons? (Miller, Pg#11: 1999) Cultural anthropology encompasses all aspects of human beliefs, behaviors and ideas. What would the world be like without any knowledge of other cultures? Anthropologists study different cultures to be more understanding and accepting, more appreciative and to enrich our own culture. What is the real problem with the Ku Klux Klan? Perhaps, if they took the time to understand the African-American and Jewish cultures, for example, they would be more accepting of the diversity. Hundreds of years of cultural imperialism has evolved into a legion of hate. Emic studies put the researcher ...
    Related: cross cultural, cultural anthropology, cultural diversity, cultural imperialism, cultural relativism, cultural studies
  • Difficulties Based On Cultural Differences Marketers And Advertising Agents Have To Deal With - 1,775 words
    1. Topic The report is about the difficulties based on cultural differences marketers and advertising agents have to deal with when setting up an advertising campaign. 2. Introduction The research report will try to show what are the main problems marketers are confronted with when they set up an advertising campaign for the world markets. It is not the goal of the essay to find new approaches to avoid expensive mistakes connected with the wrong advertising campaign. It rather should show with examples where global companies have made mistakes in the past, what the consequences were and should show what companies do and did to avoid such embarrassing mistakes and maybe where the changes in a ...
    Related: advertising, advertising campaign, cross cultural, cultural identity, marketers, marketing & advertising
  • Anorexia Nervosa - 1,281 words
    ... r parents and teachers no longer sustain her. She is unable to acknowledge her sexual desires and may regard her developing woman's body as an alien invasion. Her fear of adult femininity may also be a fear of becoming like her mother. According to this theory, fasting restores a sense of order to her life by allowing her to exert control over herself and others. She is proud of her ability to lose weight, and self-imposed rules about food are a substitute for genuine independence. Some students of anorexia believe that these girls starve themselves to suppress or control feelings of emotional emptiness. They struggle for perfection to prove that they need not depend on others to tell th ...
    Related: anorexia, anorexia nervosa, nervosa, grolier multimedia encyclopedia, young woman
  • Anorexia Nervosa Is Refusal To Maintain Body Weight At Or Above A Minimally Normal Weight For Age And Height Intense Fear Of - 1,280 words
    ... ers no longer sustain her. She is unable to acknowledge her sexual desires and may regard her developing woman's body as an alien invasion. Her fear of adult femininity may also be a fear of becoming like her mother. According to this theory, fasting restores a sense of order to her life by allowing her to exert control over herself and others. She is proud of her ability to lose weight, and self-imposed rules about food are a substitute for genuine independence. Some students of anorexia believe that these girls starve themselves to suppress or control feelings of emotional emptiness. They struggle for perfection to prove that they need not depend on others to tell them who they are and ...
    Related: anorexia, anorexia nervosa, body weight, height, intense, lose weight, nervosa
  • Arts Of The Contact Zone By Pratt - 1,104 words
    Arts Of The Contact Zone By Pratt In "Arts of the Contact Zone," Mary Louise Pratt introduces a term very unfamiliar to many people. This term, autoethnography, means the way in which subordinate peoples present themselves in ways that their dominants have represented them. Therefore, autoethnography is not self-representation, but a collaboration of mixed ideas and values form both the dominant and subordinate cultures. They are meant to address the speaker's own community as well as the conqueror's. Pratt provides many examples of autoethnography throughout her piece, including two texts by Guaman Poma and her son, Manuel. Although very different in setting, ideas, and time periods, they a ...
    Related: arts, pratt, zone, the intended, grammar school
  • Behavior Involved In Mate Selection And Attraction - 642 words
    Behavior Involved In Mate Selection And Attraction Reproduction in Homo sapiens, as in all animals, is a primary driving force and has been elaborated upon since the beginnings of society. Humans must take part in sexual reproduction to produce offspring, thus initiation behaviors can be studied. Commonly, the male makes advances and the female is the selector, or chooses the mate. For humans, this holds true and behavior is modified to maximize competitive receptability. This phenomenon carries across all cultural boundaries and is deeply rooted in the overall behavior patterns in the people of the culture. People try to refine their natural appearance to maximize mating opportunity. The ma ...
    Related: aggressive behavior, attraction, mate, selection, selection process
  • Biracial - 1,958 words
    Bi-Racial Table Of Contents Page # I. Cover Page 1 II. Table of Contents 2 III. Report 3 IV. Glossary 12 V. Works Cited 13 Bi-Racial Children Its 3rd grade. Im late for school, and my mother had to walk me in to class so that my teacher would know the reason for my tardiness. My mom opens the door to my class room, and there is a hush of silence. Everyones eyes are fixed on my mother and me. She tells the teacher why I was late, gives me a kiss goodbye and leaves for work. As I sit down at my seat, all of my so-called friends start to call me names and tease me. The students tease me not because I was late, but because my mother is white. Situations like this are hard for a young child ...
    Related: biracial, cultural communication, ethnic groups, personal identity, america
  • Birth Of Communication - 2,382 words
    Birth Of Communication Outline I. It is important to reflect one's own national and cultural identity to understand what is different among people of different nations. History teaches us that culture always changes because of internal or external influences, even our own cultures and values change over time. Our world today is a world in which people from different nations and cultures are getting closer and closer because of economical and political reasons. Because cultures are becoming closer, communication is the most important quality for anyone to work on if they want to work in the international society. The history of communication and the relationships that were formed in the early ...
    Related: communication technology, cross-cultural communication, cultural communication, intercultural communication, international communication
  • Body Language: Cultural Or Universal - 1,197 words
    Body Language: Cultural Or Universal? Body language and various other nonverbal cues have long been recognized as being of great importance to the facilitation of communication. There has been a long running debate as to whether body language signals and their meanings are culturally determined or whether such cues are innate and thus universal. The nature versus nurture dichotomy inherent in this debate is false; one does not preclude the other's influence. Rather researcher's should seek to address the question how much of nonverbal communication is innate and how much is culturally defined? Are there any true universal nonverbal cues or just universal tendencies modified to suit cultural ...
    Related: body language, cross cultural, different cultures, new guinea, inherent
  • Body Language: Cultural Or Universal - 1,115 words
    ... is tolerated. In private there is a great deal of touching and less privacy than in Western homes. Traditionally young people walk behind their parents and wives walk behind their husbands. Arabs are also very sensitive to nonverbal behaviour. They too engage in a great deal of behaviour that is ritualized or socially determined; it is the nonverbal cues that clarify meaning. Tradition dictates that interactants should control their emotions and the pitch of their voice. In reality men often show powerful displays of emotion, even going so far as to tear at their clothing and scream in public (Hottinger, 1963). Interpersonal attitudes are conveyed almost entirely by nonverbal cues. Becau ...
    Related: body language, cross cultural, cultural perspective, cultural studies, cultural understanding
  • Conflict Management - 1,290 words
    Conflict Management Organizational Behavior But we cannot avoid conflict, conflict with society, other individuals and with oneself. Conflicts may be sources of defeat, lost life and a limitation of our potentiality, but they may also lead to a greater depth of living and the birth of more far-reaching unites, which flourish in the tensions that engender them. -Karl Jaspers The amount of entropy in corporate America has increased substantially because of two basic reasons. The first involves the immigration of a large and continuous population of ethnic, migrant workers from different corners of the world. These knowledge workers are products of varying, and at times diametrically opposing e ...
    Related: conflict management, management, south vietnam, middle class, asia
  • Conflict Management - 1,333 words
    ... in south East Asia had become the underlying assumption that was never questioned. The lack of dialogue on a topic of such magnitude points to the fact that groupthink arises from a lack of conflict. It was this lack of conflict and diversity of opinion that lead to a faulty foreign policy decision and a subsequent escalation of commitment by President Lyndon B Johnson. In a sample study to prove the effectiveness of conflict in work groups, Groups were formed to solve a problem. As in the typical experiment, there were experimental and control groups. The experimental group had a planted member who job it was to challenge the majority view; the control groups had no such member. In all ...
    Related: conflict management, conflict resolution, management, advanced technology, president lyndon
  • Cultural Diversity In Healthcare - 754 words
    Cultural Diversity In Healthcare What is meant by cultural diversity and how does it apply to nursing? Cultural diversity refers to the differences between people rooted in a shared belief and value system based on norms, customs, and way of life. Knowledge of cultural diversity is important in all levels of nursing, whether nurses are practicing in a clinical setting, education, research, or administration. This knowledge comes through communication and education between our clients, colleagues, and healthcare facilities. (Nursing World, 2000) Synthesis of Material The first step in overcoming cultural diversity is the awareness of stereotypes and prejudice's. The second step is learning ho ...
    Related: cross cultural, cultural diversity, cultural practices, diversity, diversity training, healthcare
  • Cultural Shock - 1,305 words
    Cultural Shock The stories that are told in Distant Mirrors reflect how people can be so comfortable with the way they live that they will never realize what is around them. This does not happen unless they take the initiative to research the"outside world." I focused on three stories. These three stories share in the fact that when the person researched a new culture they were in awe of the differences and similarities that they found. Plainly put, these anthropologists underwent a culture shock; "disorientation experienced by a person suddenly to an unfamiliar culture." Each anthropologist migrated to America in order to compare and contrast their culture to a country with all types of cul ...
    Related: american cultural, cross cultural, cultural values, culture shock, shock
  • Culture In International Marketing And Buyer Hehavior - 1,206 words
    Culture In International Marketing And Buyer Hehavior Index Introduction Characteristics of culture International Marketing and buyer behavior Examples of Cultural Blunders Made by International Marketers The Culture Sensitivity of Markets The Development of Global Culture Cultural Analysis of Global Markets Cross- cultural analysis Conclusion References Introduction Culture is the learned ways of group living and the group's responses to various stimuli. It is also the total way of life and thinking patterns that are passed from generation to generation. It encompasses norms, values, customs, art, and beliefs. Culture is the patterns of behavior and thinking that people living in social gro ...
    Related: buyer, buyer behavior, common culture, global culture, international marketing, marketing, marketing manager
  • Culture In International Marketing And Buyer Hehavior - 1,137 words
    ... s are all dictated by culture. Culture prescribes the manner in which people satisfy their desires. Not surprisingly, consumption habits very greatly. The consumption of beef provides a good illustration. Some Chinese do not consume beef at all, believing that it is improper to eat cattle that work on farms, thus helping to provide foods such as rice and vegetables. The Culture Sensitivity of Markets: Markets can be divided into consumer markets and industrial markets. Consumer markets can be further subdivided into durable goods markets and nondurable goods markets. A further profitable distinction in the international market place is to divide durable goods into technological products ...
    Related: buyer, buyer behavior, global culture, international marketing, local culture, marketing, marketing process
  • Evolution And Darwinism - 1,387 words
    Evolution And Darwinism In The Origin of Species, Charles Darwin poetically entailed, There is grandeur in this view of life . . .. Personifying Nature as the ultimate breeder, Darwin infers and hypothesizes what is arguably the most fundamental and profound scientific manifesto that governs what we now know about modern science and the science of discovering our past. His two theories of Natural Selection and Sexual Selection effectively bridge the gap that his predecessors could not. These concepts are imperative as their implications paved the way for Darwin's explanation of Evolution. The term Survival of the Fittest has been made synonymous with Darwinian ideology, yet to fully understa ...
    Related: darwinism, evolution, theory of evolution, over time, cross cultural
  • Evolution Of Rap Music - 2,575 words
    ... Signed: THE EVOLUTION OF RAP MUSIC Rap is a form of urban music, which emerged from the hip-hop movement of the South Bronx, New York, in the early 1970s. The hip-hop culture was comprised of the popular street activities of African-American youth during the 1970s such as: styles of language, street-slang colloquialisms, graffiti, break dancing, music and their colourful attitude and fashion. Rap music is therefor a subculture to the hip-hop movement, or what many describe as the soundtrack to accompany the other facets of the hip-hop culture . This means that any changes that take place within the hip-hop culture itself will be reflected in the subculture of rap music. Since the 1970s ...
    Related: black music, evolution, music, rap music, illustrated history
  • Evolution Of Technology - 1,482 words
    Evolution Of Technology Evolution Of Technology Primitive men cleaved their universe into friends and enemies and responded with quick, deep emotion to even the mildest threats emanating from outside the arbitrary boundary. With the rise of chiefdoms and states, this tendency became institutionalized, war was adopted as an instrument of policy of some of the new societies, and those that employed it best became - tragically - the most successful. The evolution of warfare was an autocatalytic reaction that could not be halted by any people, because to attempt to reverse the process unilaterally was to fall victim. -E.O. Wilson, On Human Nature As every day passes we are become more and more a ...
    Related: communication technology, evolution, information technology, information technology it, technology
  • Evolution Of Technology - 1,507 words
    ... us who are working Americans work with someone from a different culture. Not only can you work with them, you can learn from them. If you are in a employment situation where you do work with someone from a different culture, do you work well together? If they don't speak English can you still communicate with them? These are things that we need to think about in all working situation. If you get a job and realize that many of your co-workers are from different cultures it is important that you act in a culturally synergistic fashion. Or at least make an attempt to interact with them on a daily basis by using part of their culture. If you are the first one to take this step often times th ...
    Related: evolution, technology, international business, different cultures, reward
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