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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: criticism

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  • Animal Farm As A Social Criticism - 1,014 words
    Animal Farm As A Social Criticism Animal Farm As A Social Criticism Writers often use social criticism in their books to show corruptness or weak points of a group in society. One way of doing this is allegory which is a story in which figures and actions are symbols of general truths. George Orwell is an example of an author who uses allegory to show a social criticism effectively. As in his novel Animal Farm, Orwell makes a parody of Soviet Communism as demonstrated by Animal Farm's brutal totalitarian rule, manipulated and exploited working class, and the pigs' evolution into the capitalists they initially opposed. Totalitarianism is a political regime based on subordination of the indivi ...
    Related: animal farm, criticism, farm, manor farm, george orwell
  • Criticism Bridge At Andau - 374 words
    Criticism Bridge At Andau John A. Franklin Academic English 12 Mr. George May 19, 1999 Criticism on The Bridge at Andau The Bridge at Andau was written in the mid 1950's by James A. Michener. This is a documentary on the account of Hungary's people and the communist influence from Russia. Although the people of Hungary lost in their fights with the ADO and the Russians, they showed us how determination and the will to survive can overcome even the strongest evil. It is a shame that they didn't overcome all int he end. Michener did an excellent job in preserving and recording the account of the Hungarian people as they were mistreated, abused, and murdered by the Russians. The torture and abu ...
    Related: bridge, criticism, book reports, first person, bright
  • Criticism Of Anne Tyler - 1,353 words
    Criticism Of Anne Tyler The Pursuit of True Happiness Anne Tyler has said that she uses the family unit to show how people manage to endure togetherhow they grate against each other, adjust, intrude, and protect themselves from intrusions, give up, and start all over again in the morning, (Applebee et al. 1007). From this quote, a reader can assume that Tyler encourages perseverance and courage. Life all too often presents challenges, but it is how you handle those challenges that matters. Throughout many of her fictional works, characters are placed in unsettling conditions that take a toll on their lives as a whole, usually in a negative way. These unhappy characters seek escape from famil ...
    Related: anne, anne tyler, criticism, tyler, family practice
  • Criticism Of Anne Tyler - 1,328 words
    ... ances of individuals in troubled marital lives that also escape toward a better life. Delia Grinstead in Ladder of Years is a neglected and attention-starved housewife whose husband, Sam, had joined her fathers medical practice with other personal aspirations which included marrying a Felson girl, any daughter would do. Getting a wife was just on your agenda, you never loved me at all, (Ladder 29). Disrespected by her children as well, Delia struggles to have conversations with her children about issues other than what they need at the grocery store. Her children interrupt her when she begins talking about her day and even find it too difficult to give her phone messages left on the answ ...
    Related: anne, anne tyler, criticism, tyler, medical practice
  • Historical Criticism Of Mans Fate - 1,686 words
    Historical Criticism Of Man's Fate Man's Fate is a fictional story based on the 1927 Chinese revolution in Shanghai. The main characters, Ch'en, Kyo, May, Katov, and Old Gisors represent different facets of Malraux's belief system and personality. The story opens where Ch'en is in the room of a sleeping man who he's about to assassinate. The assassination of the businessman can be seen as the destruction of the capitalism Malraux saw as the cause of the "oppressed and exploited Chinese" (Greenlee 59). Malraux came from a broken home and had great empathy for the working class. As Ch'en is holding the dagger, he focuses on his victim's foot because he is about to destroy a living thing. Ch'en ...
    Related: criticism, historical criticism, mans, labor force, chinese art
  • Huck Finn As Social Criticism - 255 words
    Huck Finn As Social Criticism Akshay Upadhyaya The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn criticized two main points of ante-bellum southern life: slavery and ignorance. Slavery was an institution of southern life, and it prompted the white people to think that they were better than blacks, whom they considered to be stupid and criminal. If there was a crime that could be pinned on a black man, it was done. For example, people at first thought the Huck's father killed him, but when they discovered that Jim was missing, they immediately blamed him for Huck's death. In addition to relegating blacks to second-class status, slavery also broke apart their families. The slave family that the Wilks' owned ...
    Related: adventures of huckleberry finn, criticism, finn, huck, huck finn, huckleberry finn, social order
  • Social Criticism In Literature, As Found In George Orwells Animal Farm And Charles Dickens A Tale Of Two Cities Many Authors - 1,568 words
    "Social Criticism in Literature, As Found in George Orwell's Animal Farm and Charles Dickens' A Tale of Two Cities." Many authors receive their inspiration for writing their literature from outside sources. The idea for a story could come from family, personal experiences, history, or even their own creativity. For authors that choose to write a book based on historical events, the inspiration might come from their particular viewpoint on the event that they want to dramatize. George Orwell and Charles Dickens wrote Animal Farm and A Tale of Two Cities, respectively, to express their disillusionment with society and human nature. Animal Farm, written in 1944, is a book that tells the animal ...
    Related: animal farm, authors, charles darnay, charles dickens, criticism, farm, george orwell
  • The Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn Can Be Considered A Great Novel Because Of Its Social Criticism, Its Authenticity, Its Rel - 617 words
    "The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn" can be considered a great novel because of its social criticism, its authenticity, its relation to God and the supernatural, and by the way it was written. Huck Finn can be considered a great novel because of its social criticism which is shown through satire. Satire is used to criticize something that the writer deems socially wrong. Mark Twain uses satire to criticize man's cruelty to man and religious hypocrisy. Twain criticizes man's cruelty to man mainly through the treatment of slavery throughout the novel. Twain's criticism of religious hypocrisy is shown when Huck stays with the Grangerfords in chapter 17. In the chapter, the Grangerfords took the ...
    Related: adventures of huckleberry finn, finn, huck finn, huckleberry, huckleberry finn, social life, the adventures of huckleberry finn
  • The Most Potent Form Of Criticism That A Writer Can Use Is Satire Satire Is A Form Of Irony Wherein The Speaker Uses False Pr - 651 words
    The most potent form of criticism that a writer can use is satire. Satire is a form of irony wherein the speaker uses false praise in order to condemn an idea or event. Chaucer was a pioneer in the realms of English and criticism. He popularized the use of the satiric mask. A satiric mask is when the writer has the speaker like or support something for trivial and unjustifiable reasons. By having the speaker supporting things for all the wrong reasons the writer makes the situation absurd and it is this absurdity that is the satiric source. For example, the speaker Chaucer tends to like morally corrupt individuals for odd reasons. He admires the monk because he is wealthy, gregarious, and po ...
    Related: criticism, irony, satire, speaker, wife of bath
  • True Human Nature Criticism Of Lord Of The Flies - 891 words
    True Human Nature (Criticism of Lord of the Flies) Reading Lord of the Flies, one gets quite an impression of Goldings view on human nature. Whether this view is right or wrong, true or not, is a point to be debated. This image Golding paints for the reader, that of humans being inherently bad, is a perspective not all people share. This opinion, in fact, is a point that many have disagreed with when reading his work. There are many instances throughout Lord of the Flies that state Goldings opinion suggesting an evil human nature. Each of these instances are the bricks holding together his fortress of ideas that are constantly under attack. Lord of the Flies is but an abstract tool of Goldin ...
    Related: criticism, flies, human nature, lord of the flies, holy bible
  • 1984 - 834 words
    1984 "Few novels written in this generation have obtained a popularity as great as that of George Orwells 1984." George Orwells popular and powerful novel was not just a figment of his imagination, it was spawned from many experiences from childhood to early adulthood, as well as from events circa World War II. At age eight, he was shipped off to boarding school where he was the only scholarship student among aristocrats. This was Orwells first taste of dictatorship, of being helpless under the rule of an absolute power. Unlike his classmates, Orwell was unable to afford to go to Oxford or Cambridge and his grades kept him from winning any more scholarships (Scott-Kilvert, 98). Therefore, he ...
    Related: 1984, early adulthood, marshall cavendish corporation, methods used, police
  • 1984 By George Orwell - 983 words
    1984 By George Orwell "War is peace. Freedom is slavery. Ignorance is strength." This is the slogan of the Ministry of Truth, a branch of the totalitarian government in post-war London. The figurehead of this government is Big Brother, who employs a vast army of informers called the Thought Police who watch and listen to every citizen at all times through a device called a telescreen for the least signs of criminal deviation or unorthodox thoughts. This novel, like Orwells earlier work Animal Farm and Aldous Huxleys Brave New World, is an example of anti-utopian fiction, that kind of fiction which shows man at the mercy of some force over which he has no control. Anti-utopian novels are usua ...
    Related: 1984, george orwell, orwell, brave new world, human experience
  • A Comparison And Contrast Of Nature - 1,208 words
    A Comparison And Contrast Of Nature A Comparison and Contrast of Nature Professor Liberman 4-02-99 In the Nineteenth century Realism, Naturalism, and Symbolism were popular modes of expression by writers of that era. Such modes of expression were the use of nature in their writings. Two poets that really stand out among the rest are Charles Baudelaire (1821-1867) and Paul Verlaine (1844-1896). Baudelaire was referred to by many as the first Modern Poet and the father of modern criticism. Verlaine like Baudelaire was a symbolist poet, he was also French and referred to as the Prince of Poets. Both these poets touch on nature in their poems. It was in Baudelaire's Song of Autumn I and Verlaine ...
    Related: comparison, contrast, nineteenth century, north pole, discusses
  • A Comparison Of Coleridge's Rationalism To Wordsworth's Liberalism - 1,720 words
    A Comparison Of Coleridge'S Rationalism To Wordsworth'S Liberalism All friendships grow and nurture each other through time. The friendship between Coleridge and Wordsworth allowed for a special relationship of both criticism and admiration to develop. As their friendship matured, they would play important roles in each other's works, culminating in their joint publication of Lyrical Ballads, which is said to mark the beginning of the Romantic period and be a combination of their best works. Despite their basic differences in poetic styles and philosophical beliefs, they would help each other create numerous works renown for their depth and creativity. Coleridge was a reserved dreamer, a tru ...
    Related: comparison, liberalism, rationalism, young boy, samuel taylor coleridge
  • A Date With Kosinski - 1,590 words
    A Date With Kosinski A Date with Kosinski Being James Bond is every man's dream. The beautiful women, fancy cars, dangerous journeys, and beautiful women. Many men would love to be in his place where all the danger and excitement take place. We don't have that capability to become an international spy, but in the novel, Blind Date by Jerzy Kosinski, we are exposed to a life similar to that of James Bond. He goes through secret negotiations. Jerzy Kosinski's use of words greatly contributes to the novel's excellence. He forces the reader to imagine everything that happens in the novel using very descriptive words and phrases. The main character of the novel is George Levanter. He poses as an ...
    Related: young adult, nazi germany, world war ii, woman, philosophy
  • A Journey Though The Golden Gates Of Promise - 2,284 words
    ... because, without them, the United States would become overpopulated and it would slowly deteriorate. If Congress did not create the quota laws as a way to control who is allowed to enter the country, it would leave the magnificent "Golden Gates" open to anyone who wanted to enter the promise land. It is insane to even consider letting everyone of every ethnicity into the United States because the results would be devastating for the American society. American citizens often criticize that the quota laws discriminate towards different ethnic groups, but, in reality, it is common sense to prefer letting immigrants into the country that are more likely to "fit in" with the cultures being p ...
    Related: golden, promise, another country, labor laws, reject
  • A Modest Proposal By Swift - 1,196 words
    A Modest Proposal By Swift A Modest Proposal was a satirical essay written by Jonathan Swift depicting the horrific conditions of Ireland and the lives of the Irish people in 1729. The author portrays and attacks the cruel and unjust oppression of Ireland by its oppressor, the mighty English and ridicules the Irish people at the same time. However, Swift's opposition is indirectly presented. Jonathan Swift is able to do so by using the persona, irony, and wit in order to expose the remarkable corruption and degradation of the Irish people, and at the same time present them with practicable solutions to their unscrupulous and pathetic lives. The author uses a satire to accomplish his objectiv ...
    Related: jonathan swift, modest, modest proposal, proposal, swift
  • A Practical Approach To Television Violence - 1,249 words
    ... rial previously rated or labeled by the television industry as to violent content.(H.R.2888 3) After decades probing the issue in one congressional committee after another, it is time to acknowledge, emphatically, that the simple choice is between censorship and responsible voluntary conduct. There is, on this topic, no middle ground. While the government can cajole the industry, even talk over the industry directly to the American public, it is ultimately the public that must decide whether to watch, protest against, or turn off particular violent programming. It cannot be legislated on a program, by, program basis. We face a far more diverse information and entertainment marketplace th ...
    Related: practical, television, television programs, television violence, violence, violence in the media, violence on television
  • A Rose, By A Vulcan Name, Would Smell As Sweet - 1,201 words
    A Rose, By A Vulcan Name, Would Smell As Sweet A Rose, By a Vulcan Name, Would Smell as Sweet. Social commentary is dangerous. In addition to risking social and political censure, the commentator must carefully convey the message. In directly addressing a problem, one risks alienating an audience before making one's point. If one indirectly approaches said problem, one may appear to lack conviction or a point. Star Trek: the Original Series takes a third path, that of allegory. Unfortunately, as the television series belongs to the science fiction genre, its social significance is often disregarded. However, upon examination, it is clear that the veiled nature of commentary in Star Trek is v ...
    Related: smell, sweet, time magazine, social situations, intolerance
  • A Tale Of Two Cities - 1,181 words
    A Tale Of Two Cities Resurrection in A Tale of Two Cities Resurrection is a powerful theme found throughout the plot of A Tale of Two Cities. Many of the characters in the novel are involved with the intertwining themes of love, redemption, and good versus evil. The theme of resurrection involves certain aspects of all of these themes and brings the story together. Dr. Manette is the first person to experience resurrection in A Tale of Two Cities. He is taken away from his pregnant wife and then imprisoned for eighteen very long years. Over the years, his condition deteriorates until he forgets his real name and mindlessly cobbles shoes to pass the time. In Book the First, he is released by ...
    Related: tale, tale of two cities, jerry cruncher, specific purpose, endanger
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