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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: critical essays

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  • 1984 - 1,219 words
    ... statements that change every day. The other reason for the diary is so that in the future, people will be able to read what really, and to inform them about beliefs on the party. Like Winston, I believe George Orwell wrote 1984 in order to allow a communist country to be revealed, the Soviet Union. Orwells goal was to expose the falsehoods of the Soviet Union as the model of a socialist state. He also wanted to reveal the dangers of totalitarianism, the deterioration of objective truth, and the well thought-out manipulation of Oceanias common peoples through propaganda. The Ministry of Truth is where history and facts both significant and insignificant are rewritten to reflect the party' ...
    Related: 1984, critical essays, power over, winston smith, scare
  • A Holiday For The Virgins - 522 words
    A Holiday For The Virgins A Holiday for the Virgins. John Keats was born in LondoꗬGЉ ሀ က Ѐ ᷶ Bibliography 橢橢�� Љ ␦ 돬 돬 ೻ ? ? ? ] ˜ ˜ ˜ ˜ ˜ ŵ ĺ ļ $ ɯ Ǵ s; and became a licenced druggist. ( ) Keats earliest poems date from 1814. In 1816 John Keats, gave up his medical training and devoted himself full time to a literary career. In 1820 Keats became ill with tuberculosis. The illness may have been aggravated by the emotional strain of his attachment to Fanny Brawne, a young woman with whom he had fallen in love( ). Nevertheless, the period from 1 ...
    Related: holiday, young woman, john keats, selected poems, nicholas
  • Ae Housman: Scholar And Poet - 1,710 words
    ... not in love with him. Consequently, she should exchange her happiness and love for his suffering, thus "lie down forlorn; But the lover will be well." The metaphor Lovers ills are all to buy....Buy them, buy them" is suggesting that the lads happiness is at the maidens expense (Hoagwood 51). Terence Hoagwood claims: The dualized pairs- buy and sell, well and forlorn, lad and maiden- remain opposed (rather than resolved or reconciled) at the poems end, helping to account for the considerable tension that the poem sustains: the contradictions survive, rather than disappearing (as in sentimentalized love poetry) into a happy illusion at the end (Hoagwood 51). In Housmans poetry, he often c ...
    Related: poet, scholar, new jersey, the giver, mood
  • Alfred Housman - 1,708 words
    ... love with him. Consequently, she should exchange her happiness and love for his suffering, thus"lie down forlorn; But the lover will be well." The metaphor Lovers ills are all to buy....Buy them, buy them" is suggesting that the lads happiness is at the maidens expense (Hoagwood 51). Terence Hoagwood claims: The dualized pairs- buy and sell, well and forlorn, lad and maiden- remain opposed (rather than resolved or reconciled) at the poems end, helping to account for the considerable tension that the poem sustains: the contradictions survive, rather than disappearing (as in sentimentalized love poetry) into a happy illusion at the end (Hoagwood 51). In Housmans poetry, he often concentrat ...
    Related: alfred, housman, critical essays, columbia university, allan
  • An Analysis Of Hamlet - 391 words
    An Analysis Of Hamlet It is reasonable to wonder what Shakespeare had in mind while writing Hamlet. After all, Shakespeare wasn't a philosopher or historian,or even a literary critic. He was a playwright. He didn't leave us critical essays examining his work. It is left to us to examine his work and decide for ourselves, if we care to, what Shakespeare was thinking. Did he know that he was writing a drama of deep psychological significance, a play which would eventually be viewed and read the world over, produced many times over hundreds of years, taught in schools, and thought of as one of the world's greatest plays? I, for one, imagine him dotting the i in the last word of the play, silenc ...
    Related: hamlet, last word, critical essays, king lear, shakespeare's
  • Arthur Millers Death Of A Salesman 1949, 1977 Portrays A Man Who Struggles With The Task Of Having A Good Family Relationship - 1,833 words
    Arthur Miller's Death of a Salesman (1949, 1977) portrays a man who struggles with the task of having a good family relationship at home with his wife and two sons, and procrastinating being a successful salesman. The play reveals how procrastination can destroy an individual's life. Through an analysis of the character of Willy Loman and his actions in the five major periods of his life (i.e., sending Biff to college and showing interest in his football ability, paying the last house payment on the house, getting fires from his job of some thirty-odd years, having Biff catch him cheating on Mrs. Loman, committing suicide by running his car into a tree), the theme is developed. Willy Loman m ...
    Related: arthur, arthur miller, death of a salesman, family relationship, good news, salesman
  • Canterbury Tales - 1,005 words
    ... ee, nor of his wif." (55-56) and the miller pays heed to this warning, suppressing curiosity of "Goddes privetee" as regards the flood and trusting his wife so much as to leave her alone and independent while he travels on his business. This blind acceptance of 'Goddes' mysteries and his wife's deceit leads to his metaphoric and literal downfall when the tale comes to it's climax, as the miller falls from the roof, and again, literally and metaphorically waking up to find his wife having had sex with another man. The miller's wife Alison is another character that is represented using this same process of creating a stereotypical figure and then adding flaws and perversions. Alison is pre ...
    Related: canterbury, canterbury tales, the canterbury tales, geoffrey chaucer, the knight
  • Edgar Allen Poe - 1,019 words
    Edgar Allen Poe Michelle Holleran En 101 G. Pandolfi Nov. 14, 1999 Edgar Allan Poe's Life and the Effects it Had On His Writing Edgar Allan Poe could probably be named one of literature's most controversial writers of all time. Over the years, Poe's works have endured much criticism as well as much praise. Many professionals who have researched Poe's life and his writings feel that many of his writings strongly show reflections on Poe's real life. Poe was born in Boston, Massachusetts on January 19, 1809. He was born the son of Elizabeth and David Poe. David attempted to make a living by performing on stage, but he seemed to be giftless in this area. Elizabeth died being poverty stricken in ...
    Related: allen, edgar, edgar allan, edgar allan poe, edgar allen
  • Edgar Allen Poe - 998 words
    Edgar Allen Poe Allan Poe could probably be named one of literature's most controversial writers of all time. Over the years, Poe's works have endured much criticism as well as much praise. Many professionals who have researched Poe's life and his writings feel that many of his writings strongly show reflections on Poe's real life. Poe was born in Boston, Massachusetts on January 19, 1809. He was born the son of Elizabeth and David Poe. David attempted to make a living by performing on stage, but he seemed to be giftless in this area. Elizabeth died being poverty stricken in the year 1811. Poe then was separated from his brother and his sister because his father was unstable to care for them ...
    Related: allen, edgar, edgar allan, edgar allan poe, edgar allen
  • Farewell To Arms By Ernest Hemingway - 1,400 words
    ... oward the end, Ernest started to travel again, but almost the way that someone does who knows that he will soon die. He suddenly started becoming paranoid and to forget things. He became obsessed with sin; his upbringing was showing, but still was inconsistent in his behavior. He never got over feeling like a bad person, as his father, mother and grandfather had taught him. In the last year of his life, he lived inside of his dreams, similar to his mother, who he hated with all his heart. He was suicidal and had electric shock treatments for his depression and strange behavior. On a Sunday morning, July 2, 1961, Ernest Miller Hemingway killed himself with a shotgun. Ernest Hemingway take ...
    Related: a farewell to arms, ernest, ernest hemingway, ernest miller hemingway, farewell, farewell to arms, hemingway
  • Flannery Oconnor: Themes - 1,326 words
    Flannery O'connor: Themes Flannery OConnors Themes: Alienation, True Country, and the Demonic OConnor uses many themes throughout all of her works. Her most criticized themes are alienation, true country life, and the demonic. Throughout the short stories of A Good Man is Hard to Find, Everything That Rises Must Converge, Good Country People, The Life you Save Might be your Own, The Geranium, A Circle in the Fire, and The River OConnor speaks of her heritage and her religious faults. Miss OConnor created characters and their dramatic oppositions by separating, exaggerating, and polarizing elements in herself (Hyman 359). OConnor could be considered a writer of apocalyptic violence, a grotesq ...
    Related: flannery, flannery o'connor, mentally challenged, local color, tragedy
  • Hamlet And Father - 898 words
    Hamlet And Father There are many different reasons why Hamlet must avenge the death of his father the late King Hamlet. The aspect of justice versus revenge is a prominent theme throughout the play. Prominent characteristics in each of the characters seeking revenge shows the different aspects of what each character feels is justice. Hamlet is notoriously known for being a man of action. This characteristic hampers the chain of events that follow after his fathers slaying. There are many reasons why Hamlet wants to avenge his fathers murder, and justice and revenge play a big role in when and where his revenge on Clauduis is played out There is the revenge that he feels must be carried out t ...
    Related: hamlet, king hamlet, critical essays, the bible, scholar
  • Hamlet Minor Characters - 1,263 words
    Hamlet Minor Characters It is reasonable to wonder what Shakespeare had in mind while writing Hamlet. After all, Shakespeare wasn't a philosopher or historian, or even a literary critic. He was a playwright. He didn't leave critical essays examining his work. It is left to us to examine his work and decide for ourselves, if we care to, what Shakespeare was thinking. Did he know that he was writing a drama of deep psychological significance, a play which would eventually be viewed and read the world over, produced many times over hundreds of years, taught in schools, and thought of as one of the world's greatest plays? I, for one, imagine him crossing the "t" in the last word of the play, put ...
    Related: hamlet, ophelia hamlet, last word, king lear, historian
  • Hemingway Protagonist Soldiers Home - 1,139 words
    Hemingway Protagonist - Soldier's Home Various authors, through years of discipline, develop their own style in creating characters. Ernest Hemingway varied his style by establishing an indestructible template for pressing characters into molded protagonists. This "template" protagonist follows a unique set of standards unlike any other character, produced by any other author. In his literary work "Soldier's Home", Hemingway creates the character Krebs to abide by this set of standards. By working within the circumstances presented to him, Krebs fits the mold of a typical Hemingway protagonist by overcoming his disillusions through heroic actions. To begin with, Krebs returns home from World ...
    Related: ernest hemingway, hemingway, protagonist, soldiers home, literary works
  • Henry David Thoreau - 861 words
    Henry David Thoreau Henry David Thoreau American literature during the first half of the nineteenth century took many forms and ideas that still effect our ever so changing society today. Henry David Thoreau was among the notable writers during this time, and his impact of American literature will not soon be forgotten. His perseverance, love for nature, and humanitarian beliefs helped to mold the ideas and values of early American history. He was born in Concord, Massachusetts on July 12 in 1817. His parents, both abolitionists of slavery, were John and Cynthia Thoreau. During his childhood years his parents, along with Henrys older siblings John Jr. and Helen, often took the family on long ...
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  • It Is Reasonable To Wonder What Shakespeare Had In Mind While Writing Hamlet After All, Shakespeare Wasnt A Philosopher Or Hi - 1,259 words
    It is reasonable to wonder what Shakespeare had in mind while writing Hamlet. After all, Shakespeare wasn't a philosopher or historian, or even a literary critic. He was a playwright. He didn't leave critical essays examining his work. It is left to us to examine his work and decide for ourselves, if we care to, what Shakespeare was thinking. Did he know that he was writing a drama of deep psychological significance, a play which would eventually be viewed and read the world over, produced many times over hundreds of years, taught in schools, and thought of as one of the world's greatest plays? I, for one, imagine him crossing the t in the last word of the play, putting down his pen, and say ...
    Related: hamlet, ophelia hamlet, philosopher, reasonable, shakespeare, wasnt
  • Kafkas Truth - 1,197 words
    ... ccessive guard may represent a layer, more obscured and impenetrable than the last, of the inner self that one must come in contact and bypass during an in depth search for true identity. At last, the Gate symbolizes not only the path to truth, but the threshold which must, in one way or another, be crossed before entering the path. The Gate is never closed during the many years that the Man waits for permission to enter, indicating that the only barrier from the truth is mans unwillingness to seek it. When the Gate is finally closed, it is not because a man was refused entrance, it was because man refused to enter it. Kafka created a rapidly sketched portrait of human condition, mans fr ...
    Related: franz kafka, metamorphosis kafka, penguin books, hypothetical situation, rail
  • Literary Criticisms Of Emily Dickinsons Poetry - 1,348 words
    Literary Criticisms of Emily Dickinson's Poetry -1- Throughout Emily Dickinson's poetry there are three main themes that she addresses: death, love, and nature; as well as the impact of "the word". When discussing these themes she followed her lifestyle and broke away from traditional forms of writing and wrote with an intense energy and complexity never seen before and rarely seen today. She was a rarity not only because of her poetry but because she was one of the first female pioneers into the field of poetry. One of the most fascinating things about Dickinson's poetry is her overwhelming attention to detail, especially her "pin-point" insights on death. In "I've Seen a Dying Eye," by Emi ...
    Related: emily, emily dickinson, poetry, critical essays, men and women
  • Little White Lie - 1,833 words
    ... animal's heart driven motivations drives them to individually try and make life better for themselves and leads the pigs towards greediness and the eventual assertion of power. The pigs go through the Jones's farm house and eventually come away with all its clothing, excess food and alcohol three things that eventually set them apart from the rest of the animals. We can see this lead to the argument, inherent in the episode, that man will always be driven towards such things as private property another evident criticism of Marxist belief. The materialistic understanding of society, however, is a nod to Marxist analysis, though the notion that men are so different that can not fully be ...
    Related: civil war, old major, private property, napoleon, savage
  • Marriage In Chaucers The Canterbury Tales - 1,425 words
    Marriage In Chaucer's The Canterbury Tales Chaucer's The Canterbury Tales demonstrate many different attitudes toward and perceptions of marriage. Some of these ideas are very traditional, such as that discussed in the Franklin's Tale, and others are more liberal such as the marriages portrayed in the Miller's and the Wife of Bath's Tales. While several of these tales are rather comical, they do indeed give us a representation of the attitudes toward marriage at that time in history. D.W. Robertson, Jr. calls marriage the solution to the problem of love, the force which directs the will which is in turn the source of moral action (Andrew, 88). Marriage in Chaucer's time meant a union between ...
    Related: canterbury, canterbury tales, geoffrey chaucer, successful marriage, the canterbury tales
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