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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: criminology

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  • Criminology - 688 words
    Criminology criminology, the study of crime, society's response to it, and its prevention, including examination of the environmental, hereditary, or psychological causes of crime, modes of criminal investigation and conviction, and the efficacy of punishment or correction as compared with forms of treatment or rehabilitation. Although it is generally considered a subdivision of criminology also draws on the findings of psychology, economics, and other disciplines that investigate humans and their environment. In examining the evolution and definition of crime, criminology often aims to remove from this category acts that no longer conflict with society's norms and acts that violate the norm ...
    Related: criminology, white collar, psychiatric treatment, collar crime, agenda
  • Criminology - 1,619 words
    Criminology Criminology One of the biggest issues in America today is crime. It is a large problem that continues to erode our country economically as well as morally. Because of the vastness of the problem, many have speculated what the cause for crime may be in hopes that a solution will be found. Many believe that a bad family life, location of residence, and poverty hold a few of the answers to why an individual becomes involved in criminal activity. Crime has been a major problem addressed in every presidential campaign for about three decades. This is because the American people are sick of the ever growing problem and seem to be voting for whoever claims to do the most about it. Major ...
    Related: criminology, family member, national bank, fiscal year, reform
  • Criminology - 607 words
    Criminology Hai Pham 6/16/99 Criminology One child grows up to be somebody who just loves to learn. And the other child grows up to be somebody who just loves to burn (198) An excerpt of this poem paints a picture of two brothers, John and Robert Wideman, leading different lives. Robert Wideman, embraced a path common for black men during that era; a life of crime, glamour, and drugs. Quietly sitting in jail, he reminisces deeply about his troubled past and the consequences of the future that now haunts him. John, on the other hand, chose the path less taken by those living in the same world as he did and in due time become a successful professor at a University. How did two people from the ...
    Related: criminology, social status, deviant behavior, criminal behavior, achieving
  • Criminology Thoughts On Plea Bargaining - 1,281 words
    Criminology - Thoughts On Plea Bargaining KWM SOCL 4461 May 07, 2001 The current tone of the criminal justice system, particularly the prosecution phase, emphasizes, "clearing the docket". While this is true of both civil and criminal courts, it is very much encouraged in criminal matters where the prosecution likely has the upper hand on most, if not all, defendants. As a result, the practice of Plea Bargaining is over used and likely results in many injustices. The fact of the matter is that the state, who is for all practical purposes the prosecution, has unlimited resources and will not hesitate to use these resources to prosecute a crime, particularly a high profile crime such as murder ...
    Related: bargaining, criminology, plea, plea bargaining, public defender
  • Accomplice Liabilty - 2,655 words
    ... er to determine the legislative intent behind this statute. There is no concrete history for the present code but the court relied on commentary from the tentative draft of the Alaska Criminal Code revision. The commentary states, "Subsection (2) codifies the current case law that one is liable as a traditional 'accomplice' if he acts 'with intent to promote or facilitate the commission of the offense'." Alaska Criminal Code Revision Part II, at 31 (Tent. Draft 1977) (citations omitted) quoted in 818 P.2d 691, 692. This comment is persuasive because prior to the revision every time the Supreme Court of Alaska defined the mens rea requirement for an accomplice it stated that one has to ha ...
    Related: criminal law, criminal case, drunk driving, alaskan, requirement
  • Anti Death Penalty - 1,706 words
    Anti Death Penalty Disasters in Death Introduction I. Roosevelt Collins, a black man in Alabama, was convicted of rape, sentenced to death, and executed in 1937. Roosevelt testified that the victim who was white had consented to sex, which caused a near-riot in the courtroom. The all-white jury deliberated for only FOUR minutes. Later interviews with several jurors revealed that although they believed the act was consensual, they also thought that he deserved death simply for messin around with a white woman. Even the judge, off the record, admitted his belief that Roosevelt was telling the truth, QUOTE: An innocent man went to his death. Horace Dunkins was executed on July 17, 1989. His att ...
    Related: death penalty, death row, penalty, penalty focus, penalty information center
  • Attacks On The Insanity Defense The Insanity Defense Refers To That Branch Of The Concept Of Insanity Which Defines The Exten - 1,858 words
    ATTACKS ON THE INSANITY DEFENSE The insanity defense refers to that branch of the concept of insanity which defines the extent to which men accused of crimes may be relieved of criminal responsibility by virtue of mental disease. The terms of such a defense are to be found in the instructions presented by the trial judge to the jury at the close of a case. These instructions can be drawn from any of several rules used in the determination of mental illness. The final determination of mental illness rests solely on the jury who uses information drawn from the testimony of "expert" witnesses, usually professionals in the field of psychology. The net result of such a determination places an ind ...
    Related: branch, insanity, insanity defense, major problem, legal definition
  • Boot Camps - 1,983 words
    ... e said, should be considered when designing any program for youth: Adolescents are fairness fanatics. Running any adolescent group care program is difficult because adolescents are very sensitive to anything they perceive as unfair, particularly anything that applies to the whole group. Adolescents reject imposed structure and assistance. Adolescents respond to encouragement, not punishment. Although they may change their behavior to avoid punishment, their attitudes and behaviors do not change in response to punishment (Andrews, 1990). The implications of these three factors are that youth will defend themselves against what they see as unfair, regardless of the motivation of the adults ...
    Related: boot, boot camps, juvenile court, support system, rehabilitation
  • Catherine The Great - 1,166 words
    ... inst Turkey. Nevertheless, the drafts written by the electives were not wasted, as the materials were employed in a "Description of the Russian Empire and its International Administration and Legal Enactments," published in 1783. This proclamation was the closest thing that Russia had to a law code for the next 50 years (Hosking 100). It denounced capital punishment and torture, it argued for crime prevention and, in general, "was abreast of advanced Western thought for criminology" (Riasanovsky 259). Catherine decided that, before positing common interests, which did not exist, she should put more backbone into fragmented Russia by creating institutions which would enable citizens to wo ...
    Related: catherine, catherine the great, russian empire, everyday life, contribution
  • Class, State, And Crime: Social Conflict Perspective - 1,129 words
    Class, State, And Crime: Social Conflict Perspective Michael Merchant Class: Social Psychology Class, State, and Crime : Social Conflict Perspective How does Class, state ,and social controls within a capitalistic society lead to increase crime due to the criminal laws and criminal justice system imposed on the lower middle class. Social conflict theory is the only one out of the vast number of criminology theories that deals directly with this problem. From out of it's Marxist roots arose a theory which challenges the way in which today's society views it's legal system and the implications it has on it's working class citizens. The nature and purpose of social conflict theories is to exami ...
    Related: conflict perspective, conflict theory, social change, social class, social conditions, social conflict, social control
  • Control As Enterprise: Reflections On Privatization And Criminal Justice - 2,820 words
    Control As Enterprise: Reflections On Privatization And Criminal Justice Thank you very much for the welcome, and for giving my talk. When the Fraser Institute called me last year, they rang up and said they were having a conference and we would like to invite you, and I thought I think you have the wrong person. Basically, everybody else there, except myself and one person from Nova Scotia, were in favour of privatization and very strongly in favour of it, especially with respect to prisons. It was actually very educational and interesting to engage in that debate. First of all I would like to thank you very much for the invitation and to wish you all the best with your new programme. I am ...
    Related: crime control, criminal, criminal justice, justice system, privatization
  • Crime And Prostitutes - 925 words
    Crime and Prostitutes Prostitution is ambiguous to define. The Macquarie dictionary defines prostitution as 1. the act or practice of engaging in sexual intercourse 2. any base or unworthy use of talent, ability, etc. But the act of prostitution involves many other associated facets that are included under this extensive act. There's the act itself, soliciting, advertising, pimping, house brothels, street prostitution, phone sex and even computer sex. Sweden treats prostitution as legal, however pimping is illegal. Canada bans soliciting for prostitution, but not the act themselves. Except for a few places in Nevada, the United States bans prostitution but permits its advertisement and toler ...
    Related: crime, social environment, legal definition, university press, commercial
  • Crime And Punishment - 1,517 words
    Crime And Punishment The crime problem in the United States has historically been misstated and exaggerated by bureaucrats and politicians. The intentions behind these overstatements vary within each context but a common thread emerges upon closer examination. As in any capitalist society, money and material possession are the primary motivation that fuels society and people. It could be argued that FBI director Louis Freeh made his comments to the National Press Club in 1994 out of genuine concern for the American people, but realistically the statement was made in an effort to gather support and increase funding for law enforcement. Following this statement and from increased pressure from ...
    Related: crime, crime and punishment, crime control, crime problem, crime rate, crime report, property crime
  • Discrimination And The Death Penalty - 1,838 words
    Discrimination And The Death Penalty Discrimination and the Death Penalty By Katie Matthews Twenty years have past since this court declared that the death penalty must be imposed fairly, and with reasonable consistency, or not at all, and, despite the effort of the states and courts to devise legal formulas and procedural rules to meet this daunting challenge, the death penalty remains fraught with arbitrariness, discrimination, caprice and mistake. --Justice Harry Blackmun, Feb. 22, 1994. Capital punishment is one of the most debatable subjects, in American society. Proponents of the death penalty believe it is justice--retribution for the crimes committed. The reason underlining Americans ...
    Related: death penalty, death row, discrimination, federal death, penalty, racial discrimination
  • Discussions On The Scared Straight Program - 1,889 words
    Discussions On The Scared Straight Program The recent media obsession with the scared straight program, juvenile boot camps and other scare tactics has lead to the question as to whether they actually are beneficial or not in treating adolescent criminal recidivism. On television programs like Maury (Pauvich) the answer to treating the troubled young girls who are brought to the show is boot camp. Those in charge take these girls to prisons, dangerous streets at night and often morgues to make a visual argument as to where they will end up as a result of the path they've taken. They also go through a rigorous run with drill sergeants to break down their egos. Of course it only last one day a ...
    Related: straight, waveland press, scare tactics, television programs, worthwhile
  • Dna Profiling - 1,264 words
    DNA Profiling Genetic engineering has developed and blossomed at a frightening rate in the last decade. Originating as merely an area of interest for scientists, genetic engineering has now become an area of which all people should be somewhat knowledgeable. DNA profiling has many uses, both positive and negative, in our society. Aside from its usefulness in many legal investigations, DNA profiling can be used in the workplace to discriminate against employees whose profiles could pose a financial risk. For example, genetic technology can and has been used to determine the capacity of a person to contract certain diseases, such as sickle-cell anemia, which could cause many employers to hesit ...
    Related: dna profiling, profiling, criminal investigations, federal government, jury
  • Drugs And Crime - 1,450 words
    ... t if they live with the general population, it is much harder to break away from old habits. The primary clinical staff is usually made up of former substance abusers that at one time were rehabilitated in therapeutic communities. The perspective of the treatment is that the problem is with the whole person and not the drug. The addiction is a symptom and not the core of the disorder. The primary goal is to change patterns of behavior, thinking, and feeling that predispose drug use (Inciardi et al. 1997, pp. 261-278). This returns to the general theory of crime and the argument that it is the opportunity that creates the problem. If you take away the opportunity to commit crimes by chang ...
    Related: crime, crime prevention, drug abuse, drug treatment, drugs, drugs and crime, war on drugs
  • Execution Of Juveniles - 1,353 words
    ... . There are forty jurisdictions in the U.S. that allow capital punishment at all; thirty-eight states, and the federal government on the civilian and military side. Of these forty jurisdictions nineteen allow the death penalty for those sixteen and older (Promises, 1999), five for age seventeen year and older, and the remaining sixteen states only allow execution for adults, those eighteen and older (Streib 2000). Even though these statistics seem to be somewhat spread out among the states the truth is that the majority of the sentences are handed out by judges in three states; Texas, who has already been mentioned as the leader in the juvenile execution topic, Florida, and Alabama (Stre ...
    Related: execution, juvenile crime, juvenile offenders, united states of america, cost benefit analysis
  • Female Delinquency - 1,730 words
    Female Delinquency One of the most important issues in crime today is Juvenile Delinquency. It is too often the cause that people see it as something new and a problem that needs to be dealt with by todays society. Female delinquency is and has been rapidly increasing in the past few years. In Girls, Delinquency, and Juvenile Justice, Lind and Shelden give an overview of juvenile delinquency among females. To fully understand the question of who, where, when, how, and why females are delinquent, it is necessary to first understand the nature of female delinquency. To comprehend the entire study of female delinquency, it is also imperative to become acquainted with the theories why females co ...
    Related: delinquency, juvenile delinquency, liberation movement, self esteem, criminal
  • Forensic Psychology - 528 words
    Forensic Psychology Part I: The Job Forensic Psychology is the application of the science and profession of psychology to questions and issues relating to law and the legal system. The word forensic comes from the Latin word forensis, meaning of the forum, where the law courts of ancient Rome were held. Today forensic refers to the application of scientific principles and practices to the adversary process where specially knowledgeable scientists play a role. There are several types of Forensic Psychologists although most fall into three different categories, criminal investigation, courtroom experts, and/or correctional psychiatrists. I decided to focus on the criminal aspect since it inter ...
    Related: abnormal psychology, child psychology, developmental psychology, forensic, psychology, social psychology
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