Research paper topics, free example research papers

Free research papers and essays on topics related to: alcoholics anonymous

  • 20 results found, view research papers on page:
  • 1
  • Alcoholics Anonymous - 1,656 words
    Alcoholics Anonymous Defining "Alcoholics Anonymous" Following is the definition of A.A. appearing in the Fellowships basic literature and cited frequently at meetings of A.A. groups: Alcoholics Anonymous is a fellowship of men and women who share their experience, strength, and hope with each other that they may solve their common problem and help others to recover from alcoholism. The only requirement for membership is a desire to stop drinking. There are no dues of fees for A.A. membership; they are self-supporting through their own contributions. A.A is not allied with any sect, denomination, politics, organization, of institution; does not wish to engage in any controversy; neither endo ...
    Related: alcoholics anonymous, anonymous, city hospital, urban areas, prayer
  • Alcohol - 654 words
    Alcohol Alcohol Alcohol is a drug, but unlike most of the other drugs, it is socially accepted and is legal. Alcohol is bad for you and does have long term affects associated with it. Such as the long addiction to it, effects on the body, and the social interaction effects. Alcohol, and alcoholism is common in America, but drinking is more common around kids. Social drinking, a term kids and drinkers have come accustom to, is defined by one standard drink per hour, and no more than 3 per day, but some people just socialize around people that drink as heavily as they do and confuse that for social drinking. Addiction to alcohol can be acquired easily if not careful, binge drinking and family ...
    Related: alcohol, alcohol consumption, binge drinking, drunk driving, drugs
  • Alcoholism - 2,059 words
    Alcoholism alcoholism Definitions and causal factors of alcoholism Alcoholism consists of a repetitive intake of alcoholic beverages to an extent that the drinker is harmed. The harm may be physical or mental; it may also be social or economic. Implicit in the conception of alcoholism as a disease is the idea that the person experiencing repeated or long-lasting injury from his drinking would alter his behaviour if he could. His failure to do so shows that he cannot help himself, that he has lost control over drinking. This conception incorporates the idea of addiction or dependence. Formal definitions of alcoholism vary according to the point of view of the definer. A simplistic, old-fashio ...
    Related: alcoholism, affective disorder, social factors, world war ii, relation
  • Alcoholism - 2,013 words
    ... times increased consumption of alcohol are cited in evidence. But these data invariably fail to take account of changes in availability or use of facilities, changes in admission or diagnostic policies, or changes in the source of beverages--for example, from unrecorded to recorded supplies. In the Soviet Union a change in the internal political situation with the death of Stalin resulted in a shift from official denial that any significant problem of alcoholism existed to an outcry that its prevalence was widespread and serious, though no statistics were provided. Treatment of alcoholism The various treatments of alcoholism may be classified as physiological, psychological, and social. ...
    Related: alcoholism, carbon dioxide, psychoactive drugs, alcoholics anonymous aa, therapy
  • Alcoholism - 1,948 words
    Alcoholism CUNNING, BAFFLING, POWERFUL, PATIENT AND DEADLY Alcoholism: Today's substance abuse, whether alcohol or drugs, continues to be a major social problem. Common patterns occur in all forms of substance abuse. While some types of substance abuse problems are slightly different in terms of causes and cures, experts agree that there are some do's and don'ts which relate to kicking the abuse habit. If you or a loved one have a substance abuse problem, this article can give you sound advice on understanding what substance abuse is, and what to do about it. In this article, we will refer to alcohol, although the word drug may be used synonymously in place of alcohol. What is Alcoholism? Al ...
    Related: alcoholism, chronic disease, addiction research, real thing, depressed
  • Alcoholism - 1,581 words
    Alcoholism Alcoholism is a disease of epidemic proportions, affecting 9.3 to 10 million Americans, and many professionals believe the figures are closer to 20 million (Weddle and Wishon). Alcoholism is a "physiological or physiological dependence on alcohol characterized by the alcoholics inability to control the start or termination of his drinking"(Encyclopedia Britannica 210). It consists of frequent and recurring consumption of alcohol to an extent that causes continued harm to the drinker and leads to medical and social problems. Alcoholism, however, does not merely cause harm to the alcoholic, but to the entire family as well, affecting an estimated 28 million children in this country ...
    Related: alcoholism, high school, human beings, social problems, fail
  • Alcoholism Is A Wideranging And Complex Disease That Heavily Plagues Society Drinking Is Defined As The Consumption Of A Liqu - 1,012 words
    ... igestive enzymes, which can irritate the stomach wall, producing heartburn, nausea, gastritis, and ulcers. The stomach of a chronic drinker loses the ability to adequately move food and expel it into the duodenum, leaving some food always in the stomach, causing sluggish digestion and vomiting. Alcohol may also inflame the small and large intestine (Overview 4). Moderate daily drinking may be good for the heart, but for many the risks outweigh the benefits. Even one binge may produce irregular heartbeats, and an alcohol abuser experience increased risk of high blood pressure, heart attacks, heart arrhythmia, and heart disease. Alcohol may cause cardiomyopathy (a disease of the heart musc ...
    Related: alcoholism, consumption, drinking, heart disease, heavily, legal drinking
  • Effect Of Employee Assistance Programs - 1,570 words
    Effect Of Employee Assistance Programs The Effect of Employee Assistance Programs At the Workplace Throughout the business world, one of the largest problems individual businesses face is the use of illegal drugs and alcohol. These substances greatly affect the business and workplace environments for many individuals. Employee assistance programs were created to help deal with augmenting substance abuse problems. Employee assistance programs enable a companies and its workers to detect if a co-worker is having problems and aids in helping them to overcome their problems by giving them advice or suggesting counseling. Critics have noticed some problems with this program. One problem is the la ...
    Related: assistance, assistance program, employee, employee assistance program, early detection
  • Gambling Disease - 1,058 words
    Gambling Disease In the US today, as gambling is becoming more popular so are gambling addicts. As the states institute legalized gambling, their income increases dramatically. Compulsive gambling needs to be recognized and medically treated before it is too late for the gambler. The only way to treat the disease of compulsive gambling is absence from gambling. Therefore, compulsive gambling must be considered and uncontrollable disease. According to the Merriam Webster Dictionary, compulsive means an irresistible (uncontrollable) impulse (Mish 166). A disease is defined as being an abnormal bodily condition that impairs functioning and can usually be recognized by signs and symptoms. Uncont ...
    Related: compulsive gambling, gambling, gambling addiction, legalized gambling, pathological gambling
  • Moderate Drinking - 995 words
    Moderate Drinking Moderate Drinking Alcoholism is a serious subject that relates to everyone in our society. The question of whether alcoholism should be allowed or not, forms an argument whether alcohol if drank in moderation is good for recovery or not. Many people drink in moderation to control their drinking problems, but the counter argument says it's addictive. Not only are they destroying their liver, but they are also taking a risk of getting in trouble by the law. There are a lot of issues that come up about drinking, but maybe these people can not stop one day to the next. It doesn't make them bad people if they are trying to quit by drinking in moderation. It seems that in our soc ...
    Related: drinking, moderate, support groups, cultural factors, tension
  • Out Of Sight, Out Of Mind - 533 words
    Out Of Sight, Out Of Mind Out of sight, out of mind. Californias Three Strikes law is based loosely on that very philosophy. When someone is a repeat violator of the criminal justice system, the best solution is to just lock him or her away for a life term without the possibility of parole. We should disregard any of the positive accomplishments these individuals have possibly made to society, their families and their ability to change their lives. Possibly the next step is to simply execute these repeat offenders. Why continue to spend the tax money of hard working Americans to support these criminals? Unfortunately, attitudes like the one just conveyed are too common and are fueling the fi ...
    Related: justice system, human beings, alcoholics anonymous, criminal, absolutely
  • Psych Paper - 1,283 words
    ... and got sent to a hospital. He was done with me. So I dealt with being insane and abandoned again all at once. I had no one to talk to about these things so I was sent back here to Baltimore and to Sheppard Pratt So not only did I lose my love of two years, I also lost myself. That was too much crisis at one time but the murder of my father was most traumatic. I did not get the help I needed until seven years later in Sheppard Pratt. Ever since Sheppard Pratt I have had a therapist to help me heal from the murder, and to process other strong feelings or any feelings at all. This however has not stopped me from returning to the hospital numerous times. Bi-polar is a difficult disease to b ...
    Related: psych, training program, alcoholics anonymous, middle school, psychiatrist
  • Psychology: Denial - 1,331 words
    Psychology: Denial Introduction So you don't think that you are an alcoholic. Chances are that you are not, but this is the thought that many who are unknowingly addicted to alcohol or other mind-altering agents. This denial barrier is the first of many hurdles to overcome when they are identified as having an addiction disorder. Although all denial isn't bad most of the time, addicts are often the last to recognize their disease, pursuing their addictions into mental illness, the degeneration of health, and ultimately death. This paper will explain the concept of denial, its consequences, and the implications it has for nursing care. Review of Literature and Knowledge Base What is denial? D ...
    Related: denial, terminal illness, belief system, nursing care, alcoholic
  • Selfhelp Groups - 403 words
    Self-Help Groups Self-help groups consist of individuals who share the same problem or concern. Members provide emotional support to one another, learn ways to cope, discover strategies for improving their condition, and help others while helping themselves (Wituk, Shepherd, Slavich, Warren, & Meissen, 2000). There are several goals to self-help groups. When polled, sixty-one percent of self-help groups said that their most important goal was providing emotional and social support to members. Thirty-two percent said that providing information and education to members was the most important goal. A few other goals were advocacy, special events, and fundraising. Some of the supports to members ...
    Related: alcoholics anonymous, social work, social workers, copy, buddy
  • Sobriety - 666 words
    Sobriety SOBRIETY Severe mood swings, violent rages, memory loss - each of these problems were a part of my family life during the past two or three years. These problems are the result of alcoholism. Recently, a member of my family realized his abuse of alcohol was a major problem to not only himself, but also to those around him. He would lose control of his temper and often would not even remember doing it the next day. Alcohol became a part of his daily life including work, home, and any other activities. His problem was that of a "hidden" and "high-society" alcoholism. When he was threatened with the loss of his job and the possibility of losing his family, this man knew it was time to ...
    Related: sobriety, long road, real world, alcohol dependency, counseling
  • Substance Abuse In The Workplace - 1,324 words
    Substance Abuse in the Workplace As widespread drug use is on the rise, many employers have begun to worry about the performance of their employees. Absenteeism, injuries, loss of productivity, employee morale, theft and fatalities are just some of the causes of drug use in the workplace. The idea of drug testing among workers has developed from society's concern over a perceived increase in the use of drugs and the relation between drug use and impairment, with resultant risks to the worker, fellow workers and the public. As early as 1987, 21% of employers had instituted drug-testing programs. Employers have begun to think that mass drug tests are the answer to their problems. What many of ...
    Related: abuse, substance, substance abuse, workplace, major problem
  • Teenage Alcoholism - 1,356 words
    Teenage Alcoholism Let American Consumer Counseling Help you Get Out of Debt! Teenage Alcoholism Teenagers today have no idea what alcoholism really is. They think that they can never become alcoholics. They think that it could never happen to them, but they are wrong. Stress, Family problems and the desire to be popular are wrong the cause of teenage alcoholism. Signs that a teenager has a drinking problem and steps that parents can take to help their child are what I will discuss in this paper. The critical ingredient common to all alcoholic beverages is ethyl alcohol or ethanol ( Lang 21). It is a clear, tasteless liquid formed through the fermentation of sugars by yeast spores ( Lang 21) ...
    Related: alcoholism, teenage, york city, american consumer, annual
  • Teenage Piracy - 473 words
    Teenage Piracy How does teenage piracy counteract with society? Is it flawless or does our society bring these young minds out of our world and label them as outcasts? Is there a reason why these kids are this way? I this essay it will be discussed in what manner teenage piracy, vulgarly known as hacking, affects the minds and the bodies of the young adults and how we as parents and leaders should treat this disease. A kid can get introduced to the world of hacking at a very early age. Usually this is brought to them because they are socially deprived and/or not very friendly. Hackers usually live alone, away from this world, in a world of their own in which they decide how far and how much ...
    Related: piracy, teenage, real world, human beings, camping
  • Teenage Suicide Occurs At An Alarming Rate And Can Be Directly Attributed To Three Main Causes: Depression, Substance Abuse, - 1,919 words
    Teenage suicide occurs at an alarming rate and can be directly attributed to three main causes: depression, substance abuse, and relationships. This terrible phenomenon is rapidly increasing in the United States and only in the last decade has any serious attention been paid to the underlying causes. Suicide is the third leading cause of death for young people between the ages of 15-25, with only accidents and homicide being more common! Most teenagers express various warning signs before they attempt suicide. Therefore, suicide is a preventable occurrence in the vast majority of cases. Depression is by far the leading cause of teenage suicide. Depression is a disease that afflicts the human ...
    Related: attempted suicide, main causes, substance, substance abuse, suicide, teen suicide, teenage
  • When Most People Hear The Word Alcohol They Aren't That Amused Or Surprised This Is Because The Majority Of The Po - 758 words
    When most people hear the word "alcohol" they aren't that amused or surprised. This is because the majority of the population drinks alcohol during social events or during their meals. It is very unfortunate that so many people are drinking this toxic liquid. It may not kill you the first time but over the long run it can do a lot of damage. Alcohol is the first drug known to man. It is said by many to have been discovered/made in hot climates when dates, grapes, and berries rotted and became liquor. In the old days people believed that alcohol was a medicinal healer and a tonic for the healthy. This belief went on until 1632 when drunkenness became a big problem and the law banned it. It is ...
    Related: alcohol, drink alcohol, mental retardation, intelligence quotient, organ
  • 20 results found, view research papers on page:
  • 1