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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: crime control

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  • China The Favored Nation - 1,709 words
    ... e United States by allowing United States to significantly reduce China's quotas if China violates the agreement through transshipments. Charges by the United States Customs Service of illegal transshipments by China have led the United States on separate occasions since the signing of the agreement to reduce China's textile and apparel quotas on specific products. The most recent incident occurred on September 6, 1996, when the U.S.T.R. announced that the United States would impose a $19 million dollar punitive charge against China's 1996 textile quota allowance due to China's repeated violations of the United States-China textile agreement dealing with illegal transshipments. China in ...
    Related: china, most favored nation, people's republic of china, foreign trade, intelligence gathering
  • Class, State, And Crime: Social Conflict Perspective - 1,103 words
    ... are differences between the social classes in rates of admitted delinquency, measured several ways, consistently showing higher rates on the part of the working-class boy." (McDonald, page 98) Richard Quinney see's criminal justice as a principle feature of the modern advanced capitalist society. The concept of injustice has evolved with the development of capitalism. As economic development goes through different stages the notion of justice gets tied to the basis of production securing the existing order. Capitalist justice regulates the struggle between classes in developing capitalism. "Justice in a capitalist society, today as always, is an ideological and practical instrument in c ...
    Related: conflict perspective, conflict theory, social classes, social conflict, social control, social institutions, social order
  • Control As Enterprise: Reflections On Privatization And Criminal Justice - 2,820 words
    Control As Enterprise: Reflections On Privatization And Criminal Justice Thank you very much for the welcome, and for giving my talk. When the Fraser Institute called me last year, they rang up and said they were having a conference and we would like to invite you, and I thought I think you have the wrong person. Basically, everybody else there, except myself and one person from Nova Scotia, were in favour of privatization and very strongly in favour of it, especially with respect to prisons. It was actually very educational and interesting to engage in that debate. First of all I would like to thank you very much for the invitation and to wish you all the best with your new programme. I am ...
    Related: crime control, criminal, criminal justice, justice system, privatization
  • Control As Enterprise: Reflections On Privatization And Criminal Justice - 2,864 words
    ... ness with non-profit community groups that ran many of the halfway houses and towards corporate, commercial, and for-profit groups. Second, I think this decision signals a move away from humane or at least human forms of supervision in favour of a move toward technological forms of supervision, a move from human to technological control. Let me know talk a little bit about capsicum. A more difficult scenario arose when the Ministry of the Solicitor General was approached by the private sector to try and market capsicum for use by police officers. Capsicum is a form of pepper which when packaged in a can and sprayed has the effect of totally immobilising its human target. Now given that c ...
    Related: crime control, criminal, criminal justice, justice system, privatization
  • Crime And Punishment - 1,517 words
    Crime And Punishment The crime problem in the United States has historically been misstated and exaggerated by bureaucrats and politicians. The intentions behind these overstatements vary within each context but a common thread emerges upon closer examination. As in any capitalist society, money and material possession are the primary motivation that fuels society and people. It could be argued that FBI director Louis Freeh made his comments to the National Press Club in 1994 out of genuine concern for the American people, but realistically the statement was made in an effort to gather support and increase funding for law enforcement. Following this statement and from increased pressure from ...
    Related: crime, crime and punishment, crime control, crime problem, crime rate, crime report, property crime
  • Drugs, Crime And Prohibition - 1,624 words
    ... upposed decline in illicit drug use, Anslinger started to push for even stiffer penalties. Instead of approving a new bill, the American Bar Association created a committee that was in charge of investigating the Harrison Act and the first nationwide investigation of illicit drugs. Arising from this investigation was the Narcotic Control Act, which was the most severe antidrug legislation put into affect(3). The NCA doubled the lengthy sentences of the Boggs Act, and added the death penalty in some cases. These laws also failed in extinguishing the drug epidemic. By now, most states specified that marijuana and heroin penalties should be identical, and consequently marijuana penalties we ...
    Related: crime, crime control, prohibition, violent crime, substance abuse
  • Email Privacy Rights In Business - 2,215 words
    E-Mail Privacy Rights In Business E-Mail Privacy Rights In Business E-Mail Privacy Rights in Business I. Abstract How far we have come in such a small time. When you think that the personal computer was invented in the early 1980's and by the end of the millennium, several households have two PC's, it is an astonishing growth rate. And, when you consider business, I can look around the office and see that a lot of the cubicles contain more than one PC. It is astonishing to me that such an item has taken control over the information technology arena like personal computers. Consider, however, the items that go along with personal computers: printers; modems; telephone lines for your modem; sc ...
    Related: email, employee privacy, legal rights, privacy, privacy protection, privacy rights, right to privacy
  • Federalism Poverty - 1,974 words
    Federalism & Poverty Many Americans believe that the federal government is too big, both in the number of agencies it directs and in the scope of its powers. Some people also think that the daily business of Capitol Hill has no effect on their lives, in part because they believe that politicians do not understand their problems. This dissatisfaction with Washington, D.C., in recent years has renewed debate over the division of power between federal and state and local governments. Federalism - the sharing of power between the states and the national government - has been a major issue throughout U.S. history. Thomas R. Dye defines federalism as "a division of power between two separate autho ...
    Related: federalism, new federalism, poverty, republican party, great society
  • Gun Control - 865 words
    Gun Control The United States of America is the most heavily armed population in the world. There are 200 Million guns and 60 to 65 Million legal owners who have one or more guns. In the United States, more than half of the households have guns. In 1974, nearly two million guns were produced in the United States, and four hundred thousand guns were imported. In 1975, the House Judiciary Committee Report Number 94-1103 stated that there were about three hundred thousand actual or potential handgun deaths annually! Those figures are increasing rapidly, if we do not do anything to stop it, it will became a disaster in the future. The definition of a gun is a device that discharges a shot, shell ...
    Related: control laws, crime control, gun control, most dangerous, court decision
  • Gun Control - 1,344 words
    GUN CONTROL BY I do not believe any one of us would want just anyone to be able to buy any kind of weapon they want. What I do believe is the issue at hand is not gun control but crime. That is what our main focus as a nation should be. Let's stop treating the symptoms and start treating the decease. In a recent article of Gun Control: An Issue for the Nineties. David Newton, of New Jersey reviles. "In 1994, 18,954 Americans were murdered. Of that number, 11,832 or 62 percent were killed by guns. On the average, one man, woman, or child is killed or wounded by a gun every 2.5 minutes in the United States" (Newton 7). Many Americans are disgusted by these statistics. "They look for ways to re ...
    Related: crime control, gun control, handgun control, president reagan, hilton hotel
  • Hate Crimes - 1,591 words
    Hate Crimes Hate Crimes Many political scientists and researchers to a number of policy arenas in the United States ranging from corporal punishment to the quality of urban life have applied Daniel Elazar's concept of political cultures. For a vast majority of these policy programs, a considerable correlation has been found to exist between the region examined and its approach to a specific policy. Elazar focused on three primary political cultures: the Moralist political culture (MPC), the Individual political culture (IPC), and the Traditional political culture (TPC). With more widespread media coverage, hate crimes have become more prevalent and more publicized than ever before. The Benja ...
    Related: crime control, hate crime, hate crimes, property crime, violent crime
  • Have We Lost The War On Drugs - 1,537 words
    Have we lost the War on Drugs? The War on Drugs officially started in 1972 with President Nixon declaring that drug law enforcement was not strict enough. To enforce the laws of the original Harrison Act, a new and intensified plan was to be enacted. The war reached its peak during the Reagan and Bush administrations, in which $67 billion was spent in enforcement of drug laws. The plan had worked relatively well until near the end of the Bush administration and drug use overall was down. But the Clinton administration has not been as effective and it is time to determine what our next course of action will be regarding drug enforcement. Prisons are becoming increasingly overcrowded and many ...
    Related: dangerous drugs, drug abuse, drug enforcement, drug laws, drug offenders, drug policy, drug problem
  • Juvenile Delinquency - 1,394 words
    ... s a few important questions. What is being done to prevent this? And what are our governments (local and federally) doing to help? Money makes the world go round and without government help the many social workers, psychologists, counselors and doctors trying to help this situation would not be able to do their part. The juvenile justice system is funded by multiple sources (McNeece & Roberts, 1997). Almost no federal money is expended by juvenile courts to support ongoing operations, but demonstration projects are funded with grants from the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP) and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. This appears to be changing som ...
    Related: delinquency, delinquency prevention, juvenile, juvenile crime, juvenile delinquency, juvenile detention, juvenile justice
  • Juveniles In Prison - 985 words
    Juveniles In Prison Juveniles in Adult Prisons Term Project Abstract A deep look into juveniles in adult prisons. Touch bases on several smaller issues that contribute to juveniles being in and effects of adult prisons. The United States Bureau of Prisons handles two hundred and thirty-nine juveniles and their average age is seventeen. Execution of juveniles, The United States is one of only six countries to execute juveniles. There are sixty-eight juveniles sitting on death row for crimes committed as juveniles. Forty-three of those inmates are minorities. People, who are too young to vote, drink alcohol, or drive are held to the same standard of responsibility as adults. In prisons, they a ...
    Related: federal prison, juvenile court, juvenile justice, prison system, death row
  • Oregon V Elstad - 1,798 words
    Oregon V Elstad OREGON v ELSTAD 470 U.S. 298, 105 S. Ct. 1285, 84 L.Ed. 2d 222 (1985) MERITS: Officers Burke and McAllister of the Polk County, Oregon Sheriff's office, on the basis of a witness' statement, obtained an arrest warrant for Michael Elstad, who was suspected of burglary. The officers went to Elstad's home and were escorted to his room by his mother. After instructing the respondent to dress and accompany them to the living room, Officer McAllister took Elstad's mother into the kitchen while Officer Burke stayed with the respondent. Without advising Elstad of his Miranda rights, Officer Burke asked him whether he was aware of the officer's reason for wanting to talk with him, and ...
    Related: oregon, oregon state, appeals court, due process, curb
  • Police And Their Effect On Prison Population - 1,654 words
    Police And Their Effect On Prison Population Because of the increase in crime in America, the public has demanded an increase in the amount of protection received from police. This increase in police protection has increased the incarceration level by numerous amounts within the last ten years. The number of inmates incarcerated in America is a direct cause of the policing that is going on in the streets of American cities. The method of policing has a tremendous impact on the outcome of the situation, meaning the type of policing determines the amount of arrests mad and the amount of inmates incarcerated. The historical pattern of prison sentencing has always shown that the offenders almost ...
    Related: federal prison, police, prison population, prison system, early years
  • Privacy: Katz Vs United States - 1,155 words
    Privacy: Katz Vs. United States Katz V. The United States The petitioner Mr. Katz was arrested for illegal gambling, he had been gambling over a public phone. The FBI attached an electronic recorder onto the outside of the public phone booth. The state courts claimed this to be legal because the recording device was on the outside of the phone and the FBI never entered the booth. The Supreme Court Ruled in the favor of Katz. They stated that the Fourth Amendment allowed for the protection of a person and not just a person's property against illegal searches. The Fourth Amendment written in 1791 states, The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, agains ...
    Related: katz, works cited, york macmillan, legal issues, describing
  • Racially Biased Pretextual Traffic Stops - 1,824 words
    Racially Biased Pretextual Traffic Stops The interviews excerpted here show that racially biased pretextual traffic stops have a strong and immediate impact on the individual African-American drivers involved. These stops are not the minor inconveniences they might seem to those who are not subjected to them. Rather, they are experiences that can wound the soul and cause psychological scar tissue to form. And the statistics show that these experiences are not simply disconnected anecdotes or exaggerated versions of personal experiences, but rather established and persistent patterns of law enforcement conduct. It may be that these stops do not spring from racism on the part of individual off ...
    Related: traffic, racial profiling, criminal activity, crime control, minority
  • The Contributors And Their Contributions To Modern Security - 1,292 words
    The Contributors And Their Contributions To Modern Security The Contributors and their Contributions to Modern Security The need for security has been around since the beginning of recorded time. Many came together in an effort to protect themselves and their belongings, from such threats as animals, weather and other humans. This grouping also made it easier to find food and satisfy their need for socialization. They donned weapons, erected walls, built barriers, and made laws, in an attempt to shield themselves from danger and fear. Humans evolved, as did their types of security, weaponry and barriers. Often, rulers selected individuals to aid in the enforcement of laws, as well as provide ...
    Related: private security, secret service, cook county, middle ages, weapon
  • The Rights Of Punishment - 1,730 words
    ... ting the prison population and keeping the SI members isolated, offenders are less likely to become hardened. When offenders are subjected to the long-term reality of prison, they can develop a rejection of society called prisonization. It is very difficult to re-integrate an offender after they have become hardened to the penal system. Segregation from the main prison population also means that offenders do not have as great of an opportunity to develop a network of criminals. Such sentences work by giving a new offender a startling view into penitentiary life without the effects of prisonization. Boot camps are similar to SIs in that member offenders are isolated from the rest of the p ...
    Related: punishment, boot camps, services offered, crime control, contribute
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