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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: alchemy

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  • Alchemy - 640 words
    Alchemy Alchemy is not just the changing of base metals into gold as most people think, although that was one of the goals people tried to achieve through alchemy. Alchemy is stemmed from astrology; both make attempts to understand mans relationship to the universe and exploit it. While astrology is concerned with the stars alchemy is concerned with the elements of nature. Alchemy also stemmed partly from metallurgy, a science that deals with the extracting of metals form ore and the combining of metals to make alloys. Today's modern chemistry evolved from alchemy using the extended knowledge of substances and how they react with each other. There were several goals that alchemist tried to a ...
    Related: alchemy, modern chemistry, decrease, selfish
  • Alchemy - 1,900 words
    Alchemy ALCHEMY: The science by aid of which the chemical philosophers of medieval times attempted to transmute the baser metals into gold or silver. There is considerable divergence of opinion as to the etymology of the word, but it would seem to be derived from the Arabic al=the, and kimya=chemistry, which in turn derives from the late Greek chemica=chemistry, from chumeia=a mingling, or cheein, `to pour out` or `mix', Aryan root ghu, to pour, whence the word `gush'. Mr. A. Wallis Budge in his "Egyptian Magic", however, states that it is possible that it may be derived from the Egyptian word khemeia, that is to say 'the preparation of the black ore', or `powder', which was regarded as the ...
    Related: alchemy, black white, modern times, roger bacon, france
  • Alchemy - 1,850 words
    ... e of Hermetic theory and the consciousness in the alchemical mind that what might with success be applied to nature could also be applied to man with similar results. Says Mr. Waite, "The gold of the philosopher is not a metal, on the other hand, man is a being who possesses within himself the seeds of a perfection which he has never realized, and that he therefore corresponds to those metals which the Hermetic theory supposes to be capable of developing the latent possibilities in the subject man." At the same time, it must be admitted that the cryptic character of alchemical language was probably occasioned by a fear on the part of the alchemical mystic that he might lay himself open t ...
    Related: alchemy, first half, chemical analysis, modern science, appeal
  • Alchemy - 664 words
    Alchemy Alchemy There are many ways to examine the subject of alchemy, including alchemy as a source of symbolism, psychology, and mysticism. It has also been an influence on the world view of various writers, artist, and musicians. The focus of this report is alchemy as a pre-chemistry, which gave a new impulse towards the preparation of medicinal remedies and also was a major influence on today's scientific investigations. Alchemy is an ancient art, practiced in the Middle Ages. The fundamental concept of alchemy stemmed from Aristotle's doctrine that all things tend to reach perfection. Because other metals were thought to be less perfect than gold, it was reasonable to believe that natur ...
    Related: alchemy, modern chemistry, ancient art, modern science, predecessor
  • Science Alchemy Alchemy, Ancient Art Practiced Especially In The Middle Ages, Devoted Chiefly To Discovering A Substance That - 850 words
    Science Alchemy Alchemy, ancient art practiced especially in the Middle Ages, devoted chiefly to discovering a substance that would transmute the more common metals into gold or silver and to finding a means of indefinitely prolonging human life. Although its purposes and techniques were dubious and often illusory, alchemy was in many ways the predecessor of modern science, especially the science of chemistry. The birthplace of alchemy was ancient Egypt, where, in Alexandria, it began to flourish in the Hellenistic period; simultaneously, a school of alchemy was developing in China. The writings of some of the early Greek philosophers might be considered to contain the first chemical theorie ...
    Related: alchemy, ancient art, ancient egypt, devoted, discovering, middle ages, modern science
  • Adrienne Rich - 1,721 words
    ... breadth, complexity and multidimensionality, in focusing on a fragment of a much larger statement when she states categorically that 'women's supposed complicated, pain-enduring, multipleasured physicality hardly seems a very hopeful basis on which to build resistance to their social subordination...' (14) Well no, it wouldn't be, if that were actually what Rich was proposing. I turn to a fragment from Integrity, from A Wild Patience to illustrate something of the complexity to be found in the poetry This extract is from 'Integrity', collected in A Wild Patience: Anger and tenderness: my selves. And now I can believe they breathe in me as angels, not polarities. Anger and tenderness: the ...
    Related: adrienne, adrienne rich, creative process, humane society, soar
  • Adrienne Rich - 1,720 words
    ... s Rich's breadth, complexity and multidimensionality, in focusing on a fragment of a much larger statement when she states categorically that 'women's supposed "complicated, pain-enduring, multipleasured physicality" hardly seems a very hopeful basis on which to build resistance to their social subordination...' (14) Well no, it wouldn't be, if that were actually what Rich was proposing. I turn to a fragment from Integrity, from A Wild Patience to illustrate something of the complexity to be found in the poetry This extract is from 'Integrity', collected in A Wild Patience: Anger and tenderness: my selves. And now I can believe they breathe in me as angels, not polarities. Anger and tend ...
    Related: adrienne, adrienne rich, social status, face value, complexity
  • Bacon, Roger - 442 words
    Bacon, Roger Roger Bacon was an English Scholastic philosopher, scientist and one of the most influential teachers of the 13th century. He was born in Ilchester, Somersetshire in 1214. Roger Bacon was educated at the universities of Oxford and Paris. He remained in Paris after completing his studies and taught for a while at the University of Paris. When he returned to England in about 1251, he entered the religious order of the Franciscans and lived at Oxford. He carried on active studies and did experimental research in alchemy, optics, and astronomy. Bacon was critical of the methods of learning of the times, and in the late 1260s, at the request of Pope Clement IV, he wrote his Opus Maju ...
    Related: roger, roger bacon, franciscan order, experimental research, oxford
  • Bartel - 927 words
    Bartel By The Scrivener Hawthorne I began my Hawthorne reading task with The Birth-Mark. I picked this story because I am familiar with the Maypole of Merrymount and Young Goodman Brown, and I wanted to try something different. I was pleasantly surprised with The Birth-Mark, in my mind it far surpasses the latter two stories. I think one of the most admirable traits of Hawthorne is his ability to write as though actions are taking place somewhere in the present. Aylmer could very well live today, somewhere in the world with his laboratory in the backyard. Men like Young Goodman Brown are everywhere in todays society, and, still, there are those who try and destroy that which they do not unde ...
    Related: short story, common theme, young goodman, blame, contempt
  • Birth Stones - 767 words
    Birth Stones From prehistoric shamans to modern consumerism birth stones have been a part of human life. Beginning as magical talismans, they have been used for thousands of years to cure the sick, strengthen the weak, and decorate the rich. Birth stones are a modern fad powered by the wisdom of history. In prehistoric times, every village had a shaman, or witch. The shaman would cast spells to do all sorts of things within the village. After time, shamans discovered that different rocks and minerals did different things. Gold would give energy and strength, while silver would grant love. The same thing worked with gems. Each was presented with a different quality in life that the stone coul ...
    Related: ancient times, human life, ten commandments, africa, emerald
  • Canterbury Tales By Chaucer - 1,862 words
    ... ink the wine, that he has poisoned, and also die. Fragment VII The Shipman's Tale: a fabliau in which a merchant's wife offers to sleep with a monk if he gives her money; he borrows the money from the merchant, sleeps with the wife, and later tells the merchant (who asks for his money on returning from a journey) that he has repaid it to his wife! She says that she has spent it all, and offers to repay her husband through time together in bed. The tale seems written to be told by a woman, perhaps it was originally given to the Wife of Bath? The Prioress's Prologue and Tale: a religious tale, in complete contrast to the Shipman's. A little boy is killed by wicked Jews because he sings a h ...
    Related: canterbury, canterbury tales, chaucer, the canterbury tales, the pardoner
  • Carl Gustav Jung 18751961 Was A Son Of A Minister In Switzerland He Was Born On July 26, In The Small Village Of Kesswil On L - 1,390 words
    Carl Gustav Jung (1875-1961) was a son of a minister in Switzerland. He was born on July 26, in the small village of Kesswil on Lake Constance. He was named after his grandfather, a professor of medicine at the University of Basel. He was the oldest child and only surviving son of a Swiss Reform pastor. Two brothers died in infancy before Jung was born. Jung's mother was a neurotic and often fought with his father. Father was usually lonely and very irritable. When the child could not take his mother's depressions and his parents' fights, he sought refuge in the attic, where he played with a wooden mannequin. Carl was exposed to death early in life, since his father was a minister and attend ...
    Related: carl, carl gustav jung, gustav, gustav jung, jung, minister, switzerland
  • Ernest Rutherford - 640 words
    Ernest Rutherford Rutherford was born on August 30, 1871, in Nelson, New Zealand. He was educated at the University of New Zealand and the University of Cambridge. He was a professor of physics at McGill University in Montreal, Quebec from 1989 to 1907. He was also professor at the University of Manchester in England. After 1919 he was professor of experimental physics and director of the Cavendish Lab at the University of Cambridge moreover held a professorship, after 1920, at the Royal Institution of Great Britain in London. Rutherford stated that an atom consists largely of empty space, with an electrically positive nucleus in the center and electrically negative electrons orbiting the nu ...
    Related: ernest, ernest rutherford, rutherford, great britain, nuclear physics
  • Evolutionism And Creationism - 935 words
    Evolutionism And Creationism "The Creationist battle cry can be stated thus: Public ignorance is Creationist bliss." This is just one of the many attacks made against Creationist in Richard Youngs article, "Why Creation Science Must Be Kept Out of the Classroom." Throughout the article he uses many hasty generalizations about creationist theories. The first hasty generalizations Young makes are untrue statements about the Bible. He then uses states beliefs that are true for only of a few Christians with extremist ideas, not the common Christians view of Creationism. Young continues attacking Creationist by making more hasty generalizations, and begging the question on why Creationism is a we ...
    Related: creationism, microsoft internet explorer, american bible, evolutionary theory, predict
  • Frankenstein - 1,523 words
    Frankenstein Protagonist: The protagonist in the novel is Victor Frankenstein. He is the main character who contends with the conflict in the novel. His decision to create life provides a problem that he attempts to escape but eventually marks his death. Antagonist: The antagonist in the novel is also the protagonist, Victor Frankenstein. Victor may have directed all of his hate and blame towards the monster he created, but is worst enemy lay within himself and his refusal to accept responsibility for his actions. Conflict: The main conflict in the novel is based on the "monster" Victor Frankenstein created in his laboratory. He neglects his responsibility to the monster he created by ignori ...
    Related: frankenstein, victor frankenstein, henry clerval, human beings, margaret
  • Frankenstein - 1,440 words
    Frankenstein Frankenstein has been hailed as one of the best horror stories ever. The title, Frankenstein, is the last name of the creator of the infamous Frankensteins monster, Dr. Victor Frankenstein. His is a story of the great pain suffered by Frankenstein and his monster and peoples misunderstanding of the poor creature. All his efforts to find a companion are useless, as society shuns him for his horrid figure. Although the story is told by Dr. Frankenstein through Robert Walton, an arctic explorer, the antagonist seems to be his monster. Despite his gruesome appearance, this being composed of various cadaver parts starts out as a compassionate creature longing for companionship and cu ...
    Related: frankenstein, victor frankenstein, robert walton, the girl, explorer
  • Frankenstein Support Mockpersausive Letter Format - 1,378 words
    Frankenstein Support (Mock-Persausive Letter Format) (Author's Note: This was a semi-creative project. We had to address the issues in a persuasive letter rather than a boring ol' report, so please become unconfused as far as the format..) Cal Tech Curriculum Committee: Scientists are all too ready to lock themselves away with their research, unwilling - perhaps even incapable - of seeing the consequences of their actions. It is our duty as their educators to provide them with not only a means to gain knowledge but also insights into the society into which they will ultimately release their findings. Since none here are literary or English majors, it may seem difficult at first to integrate ...
    Related: format, frankenstein, ozone layer, interest level, incomplete
  • History Of Chemistry - 1,607 words
    History Of Chemistry History of Chemistry Introduction: Humans have always been very curios creatures. The have always wondered about what they are and why they are here. Our limited knowledge of the environment has always urged for new things to be discovered. The desire to understand the world better has made people search for rational answers, for principles and laws. For centuries people have tried to unlock the mysterious world that surrounds them. History: Because myths did not explain things well enough the Greeks began to ask questions about the world around them. They did this so thoroughly and so brilliantly that the era between 600 and 400 B.C. is called the golden age of philosop ...
    Related: chemistry, history, modern chemistry, little book, golden age
  • Islamic Religion - 1,669 words
    Islamic Religion Todays Muslims are branded as terrorists or fudamentalist. But their religion is a gentle religion. On the Arabian Penninsula, home of the Arabs, was isolated and they were able to develop their civilization without outside influences. It is about 1 million miles square, that is located between the Red sea and the Persian Gulf. There are two distinctive regions. The first has well-watered valleys between mountains and the second is arid plains and desert. Grass grows quickly during the showes of the rainy season. In ancient times the Arabs were bedouin (nomads that hersed sheep, goats, and camels. and lived in tents made made of felt from camel or goat hair.) They ate fresh ...
    Related: islamic, islamic religion, religion, self defense, ancient times
  • Legacy From The Middle Ages - 406 words
    Legacy from the Middle ages Many cultural advancements were made during the Dark Ages which lasted between 500AD and 1000AD. Culture can be divided into five distinct categories such as religion/philosophy, government, science, art/architecture and language/literature. During the Middle ages, there was a great advancement in theology and many of today's finest universities were built such as the Oxford University and some others in Paris and Rome. In the early 20th century, many other universities were built using the First universities as a base. Oxford University still exists, as one of the most respected school in the world. There were also a lot of religious conflicts mainly between Musl ...
    Related: dark ages, legacy, middle ages, gothic style, oxford university
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