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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: aborigines

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  • Aborigines And Their Place In Politics - 1,065 words
    Aborigines And Their Place In Politics For much of their history, Australias major parties did not perceive a need to have Aboriginal affairs policies, but this altered in the 1960s and 1970s as the Aboriginal interest came to occupy a more prominent position. The policies of recent major governments, those being the Australian Labor Party (ALP) and the Coalition, consisting of the Liberal Party and National Party, have changed drastically since the Federation of Australia. The approaches throughout history of these major parties will be discussed briefly in order to gain an understanding of the foundation of each partys beliefs and platforms in regards to Aborigines. The main political issu ...
    Related: aborigines, self determination, international legal, aboriginal people, perceive
  • Aborigines And Their Place In Politics - 1,108 words
    ... s people in the criminal justice system. The Liberal Party reached an agreement with all states and territories to develop critical plans, in association with indigenous people, for the coordination of funding and service delivery aimed at reducing indigenous over-representation in the criminal justice system. This shows that the Liberal government is addressing the problem of Aboriginal deaths in custody, and giving weight to the issue in regards to their policies. While governments did in fact begin to respond to some of the affects of forcible removal during the 1980s, it was during the Labor governments reign that the Royal Commission into Aboriginal Deaths in Custody handed down its ...
    Related: aborigines, common law, political issues, royal commission, liberal
  • Australian Aborigines - 1,383 words
    Australian Aborigines Until this paper, I never even knew there was such a word as "Aborigine" let alone it being a race of people dating back to the prehistoric times. I thought that all Australians were of Anglo decent, but I was wrong about that assumption. The Aborigines were the first and only inhabitants of Australia, until the late 18th century when European settlers came. Because of the Europeans, the Aborigines lives would change drastically. In this paper, I am going to talk about the Aborigines, describing their origins up to the present. The Aborigines came originally from somewhere in Asia and have been in Australia for at least 40,000 years. The first settlement occurred during ...
    Related: aborigines, australian, australian aborigines, living conditions, daily life
  • Australian Aborigines - 1,418 words
    ... were forcing them off their hunting land and sacred areas. They couldn't compensate for the increasing population of the settlers. Before long, the Europeans became annoyed with the Aborigines and violence was inevitable. Some of the Aborigine groups were able to wage successful guerilla war against the Europeans, but eventually, the lack of technology became their downfall. Up to the 1880's, many Aborigines were killed as a result of fighting against the Europeans (Blainey, 93). Other groups were forced into hiding while others stayed in camps. The Aborigines who stayed in camps became the nucleus of the European labor force (Blainey, 102). Fighting wasn't the only thing that killed the ...
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  • Australia - 1,551 words
    Australia AUSTRALIA Australia is an island continent located southeast of Asia and forming, with the nearby island of Tasmania, the Commonwealth of Australia, a self-governing member of the Commonwealth of Nations. The continent is bounded on the north by the Timor Sea, the Arafura Sea, and the Torres Strait; on the east by the Coral Sea and the Tasman Sea; on the south by the Bass Strait and the Indian Ocean; and on the west by the Indian Ocean. The commonwealth extends for about about 2500 miles from east to west and for about 2300 miles from north to south. Its coastline measures some 22,826 miles. The area of the commonwealth is 2,966,150 square miles, and the area of the continent alone ...
    Related: australia, south australia, federal government, food and drink, exporter
  • Australia - 1,086 words
    Australia Australia has changed hands a lot throughout its history. From being inhabited by the aborigines, which had been there for around forty thousand years, until the British claimed it. However the British were not the first to come across this continent, they were just the first countries to see it as useful. The Dutch were seeking new land and trade in the East Indies, and found that sailing along the coasts of Africa and India too much longer than if the went due east and the cut up. However, the Dutch Vessel, Duyfken, first sighted the coast of modern day Australia in 1606 when it did not turn north in time. In 1642-43 Able Tasman was looking for new land south of Batavia, and shif ...
    Related: australia, chelsea house, national geographic, geographic society, phillip
  • Australia - 1,946 words
    Australia Australia The name of Australia comes from the Latin word Australis, which means southern. Since it lies entirely in the southern hemisphere, Australia is most commonly referred to as "down under". Australia, being a country, is also a continent. In land area its the sixth largest for a country and the smallest continent. Australia is a very dry, thinly populated country. Very few coastal areas receive enough rainfall to support a large population. The largest group of Australian people live in two large cities, Sydney and Melbourne. The vast interior is mainly desert or grassland and there are very few settlements. As a whole, the country has a density of six people per square mil ...
    Related: australia, secondary education, national pastime, coral reefs, livestock
  • Australia - 1,173 words
    Australia Australia is the only country that is also a continent. In area, Australia ranks as the sixth largest country and smallest continent. Australia is located between the South Pacific Ocean and the Indian Ocean. The part of the Indian Ocean that is south of Australia is called the Southern Ocean in the country. Australia is about 7,000 miles (11,000 kilometers) southwest of North America and about 2,000 miles (3,200 kilometers) southeast of mainland Asia. Australia is often referred to as being "down under" because it lies entirely within the Southern Hemisphere. The name Australia comes from the Latin word australis, which means southern. The official name of the country is the Commo ...
    Related: australia, south australia, high court, queen elizabeth, minister
  • Australia - 427 words
    Australia Australia is an island continent and is located southeast of Asia. Australia is the smallest continent in the world. Australia is made up of six states . The climate in Australia varies greatly: a hot season, wet season with rains falling mainly in February and March. During which north western has warm and dry season. Australians mineral resources are notably bauxite, coal, gold, iron, ore, and petroleum. The most popular and native mammals in Australia are marsupials. The best known marsupials in Australia is a kangaroo which include fifty species. In Australia forty-three percent of surface consists of desert and sandy plains. Most of the population of Australia is of European d ...
    Related: australia, opera house, great barrier reef, world war ii, olympics
  • Australia Day - 453 words
    Australia Day Australia Day Australia Day is a day set aside to commemorate the arrival of Captain Arthur Phillip and the First Fleet at Sydney Cove on the 26 January 1788. On the day of his arrival, Captain Arthur Phillip declared the area that became the colony of New South Wales to be a British possession. This landing started the first permanent European settlement on this island continent. Australia Day, January 26, is celebrated with a public holiday and celebrations in every State. The choice of the 26 January as the day of celebration for all Australians has been queried and argued by many people. That the day might symbolize invasion, dispossession and death to many Aboriginal peopl ...
    Related: australia, south wales, aboriginal people, indigenous people, notion
  • Australian Immigration Law - 1,059 words
    Australian - Immigration Law Australia is similar to America in many ways. They are both industrialized nations, they were both settled by the British, and they both have multi-ethnic societies. However, the two countries have vastly different immigration laws. In America, we will let almost anyone move here and work. An American immigrant can be from (almost) any country, race, or religion. Australia on the other hand, has had a much stricter policy determining who can move to their country. Australia's immigration law is ethnocentric in nature because it excludes anyone who is not of Anglo-Saxon descent. The policy is in the best interest for the British settlers, rather than in the best i ...
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  • Bilingual Education - 1,269 words
    ... of different cultures. When students are educated in their native language and learn to rely only on it, then they do not blend with the rest of society. Robert King, author of "Should English be the Law?" states that "language is tearing apart countries around the world" (57). The United States should not become another victim. Speaking English is a necessary skill needed to succeed in the United States. The United States job is to educate all people and teach all people English. Bilingual education programs may inhibit the reality of this goal. In contrast, Richard Rothstein, author of "Bilingual Education: The Controversy," argues that " teaching in ones native language reinforces on ...
    Related: bilingual, bilingual education, education classes, education law, education programs, education teachers, education week
  • Comparisons Of Greek And Oceanic Mythology - 1,363 words
    Comparisons Of Greek And Oceanic Mythology Jeff Cressy Cressy1 The purpose of myths is to answer questions, to educate, and to entertain. How was man created? Why does the earth do the things it does? Cultures all throughout the ancient world tried to answer these questions in the form of myth. In Greece, Australia, and New Zealand, ancient storytellers created unique stories that entertained taught values and helped explain their worlds. Even though the people of these countries were separated by thousands of miles, there are an astonishing amount of similarities between their myths. While the inhabitants of these regions may have looked totally different from each other, their myths showed ...
    Related: greek, greek myth, greek mythology, mythology, oceanic, world mythology
  • Cuban History - 1,431 words
    Cuban History History of Cuba Christopher Columbus landed on the island of Cuba on October 28, 1492, during his initial westward voyage. In honor of the daughter of Ferdinand V and Isabella I of Spain, his benefactors, Columbus named it Juana, the first of several names he successively applied to the island. It eventually became known as Cuba, from its aboriginal name, Cubanascnan. Colonization by Spain When Columbus first landed on Cuba it was inhabited by the Ciboney, a friendly tribe related to the Arawak. Colonization of the island began in 1511, when the Spanish soldier Diego Velzquez established the town of Baracoa. Velzquez subsequently founded several other settlements, including San ...
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  • Cultural Comparisons Ethnocentrism - 1,069 words
    Cultural Comparisons Ethnocentrism Culture Cultural comparisons Ethnocentrism Ethnocentrism is the name given to a tendency to interpret or evaluate other cultures in terms of one's own. This tendency has been, perhaps, more prevalent in modern nations than among preliterate tribes. The citizens of a large nation, especially in the past, have been less likely to observe people in another nation or culture than have been members of small tribes who are well acquainted with the ways of their culturally diverse neighbours. Thus, the American tourist could report that Londoners drive on the wrong side of the street or an Englishman might find some customs on the Continent queer or boorish, merel ...
    Related: cultural relativism, ethnocentrism, culturally diverse, wind power, acquisition
  • Democratization Of Taiwan - 1,421 words
    Democratization Of Taiwan Taiwan is an island country which is located off the southeast coast of China between the Taiwan Strait and the Philippine Sea. It has a land area of about 32,000 square kilometers, and claims another 3,700 square kilometers of sea around it, giving it close to a total of 36,000 square kilometers for itself. The land of Taiwan consists mainly of mountainous terrain in the east while the west has flat plains which can be compared to the middle central part of the United States. The country has a population of about 22 million people in which 9.7 million of those people are part of the labor force. Some of the groups that make up this population include native Taiwane ...
    Related: democratization, taiwan, different aspects, nationalist party, silent
  • Education And Egalitarianism In America - 2,326 words
    Education And Egalitarianism In America The American educator Horace Mann once said: As an apple is not in any proper sense an apple until it is ripe, so a human being is not in any proper sense a human being until he is educated. Education is the process through which people endeavor to pass along to their children their hard-won wisdom and their aspirations for a better world. This process begins shortly after birth, as parents seek to train the infant to behave as their culture demands. They soon, for instance, teach the child how to turn babbling sounds into language and, through example and precept, they try to instill in the child the attitudes, values, skills, and knowledge that will ...
    Related: america, egalitarianism, formal education, higher education, school education, secondary education
  • Euthanasia In Australia - 1,294 words
    ... mmonwealth parliament considered the Rights of the Terminally Ill Act to represent a basic shift in Australia's ethos and social fabric. It had additional national significance as all Australians, indeed all people, could have used the Act. It therefore became not just a matter for the people of the Northern Territory, but a matter concerning all people of Australia. The Constitutional framework of Australia divides legislative responsibility between the States and the Commonwealth. The Territories derive their legislative capacity from the Commonwealth, whereas the States do not. States therefore, are different to Territories. Territorians are consequently subjected to a different legis ...
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  • Female Genital Mutation - 1,154 words
    Female Genital Mutation Struggling against genital mutilation in Sudan In the country of Sudan, in Northern Africa, there is a procedure that is tradition and is performed on most women called female genital mutilation, or FGM, which used to be known as female circumcision. It has been a normal practice for generations, but is now the subject for international controversy on the morality and safety of this procedure. It is now known that 82 percent of Sudanese woman have an extreme form of genital mutilation done on them, normally at a young age. This form of mutilation is called the Pharaonic form and includes the total removal of the clitoris and labia, and stitching together of the vulva, ...
    Related: female circumcision, female genital mutilation, female sexuality, genital, genital mutilation, mutation
  • Gandhi His Influence In The Nonviolent Movement - 761 words
    Gandhi - His Influence in the Nonviolent Movement I think Mohandas Gandhi was one of the most significant persons in the 20th century. He was the one who proved that it is possible to fight very successful without violence. He fought his whole life with humanity, tolerance, ideas and without violence. He showed the way to a better world. And still today there are many people who love him and who use his philosophy to change the world. A very important example is the fight against wars. Usually people who fight against a war try to fight without violence. They march through cities and try to convince people not to go to the war or something like that. Another very popular example is the fight ...
    Related: gandhi, mohandas gandhi, nonviolent, nuclear waste, nuclear power
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