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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: court cases

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  • A Journey Though The Golden Gates Of Promise - 2,246 words
    A Journey Though the "Golden Gates" of Promise Great controversy exists over the true promises of the "Golden Gates" in the United States. Discrimination occurs with different ethnic groups, but for those immigrants permitted into the country, the opportunities are excellent. The laws and practices established to control immigration into the United States limit the amount of poverty that can be present in the country. Without these important practices and laws created by the United States Congress, "cheap" labor would overpower American citizen labor and lead the country to an economic and social catastrophe. Although the United States is often criticized for its establishment of immigration ...
    Related: golden, promise, north america, east africa, testimony
  • Abigail Adams Was A Unique Woman Because She Had An Education And An Interest In Politics She Learned How To Read And Write A - 756 words
    Abigail Adams was a unique woman because she had an education and an interest in politics. She learned how to read and write and enjoyed poems most. She was also very resourceful by helping her husband on difficult problems. Abigail was born on November 11 on the Julian calendar, or November 22 on the modern Gregorian calendar. Abigail had two sisters named Mary and Elizabeth or Betsy. She had one brother named William or Billy. Abigail's name was originally Abigail Smith. Each baby was baptized on the first Sabbath of its life and was recorded in their parish records. Abigail live in a comfortable house. When Abigail was sixteen, her father added a wing that was bigger than the original bui ...
    Related: abigail, abigail adams, john adams, woman, public affairs
  • Abortion - 1,964 words
    Abortion One of the most controversial topics over the years, and still today, is abortion. Is abortion murder or not? When does a fetus become a human? There are no answers to these questions. Everyone individual has their own beliefs on whether or not abortion is justifiable. Abortions have been performed throughout many of centuries. Recently, there has been a number of court cases that has changed the legality of abortions, especially in the United States, for example Roe v. Wade. Even religions have changed their views on abortions over the course of the years. In the abortions wars there are two parties, pro-life and pro-choice. Pro-life believes that abortion is murder and is complete ...
    Related: abortion, abortion laws, partial birth abortion, partial-birth abortion, stress disorder
  • Abortion - 2,032 words
    Abortion Abortion in today's society has become very political. You are either pro-choice or pro-life, and there doesn't seem to be a happy medium. As we look at abortion and research its history, should it remain legal in the United States, or should it be outlawed to reduce the ever growing rate of abortion. A choice should continue to exist but the emphasis needs to be placed on education of the parties involved. James C. Mohr takes a good look at abortion in his book Abortion in America. He takes us back in history to the 1800s so we can understand how the practice and legalization of abortion has changed over the year. In the absence of any legislation whatsoever on the subject of abort ...
    Related: abortion, induced abortion, court cases, civil war, affluent
  • Abortion And Murder - 1,060 words
    Abortion And Murder On January 22, 1973, the U.S. Supreme Court, in two separate decisions, Roe v. Wade and Doe v. Bolton, declared that Congress and the states had to adopt a policy on abortion. Since then, abortion has been one of the most controversial issues in our country today. Every time the subject of abortion is raised, the same question always comes up: should people have the right to terminate an unborn child? The answer is no. No person should have the right to terminate an unborn child which has not yet had the chance to live, no matter what the reason is. Abortion is the termination of an alive, unborn child, which can experience pain through the process of an abortion. There i ...
    Related: abortion, national abortion, medical technology, genetic information, worry
  • Abraham Lincoln - 1,920 words
    Abraham Lincoln Abraham Lincoln was born on February 12, 1809 in Kentucky. When he was two, the Lincolns moved a few miles to another farm on the old Cumberland Trail. A year later, his mother gave birth to another boy, Thomas, but he died a few days later. When Lincoln was seven his family moved to Indiana. In 1818, Lincolns mother died from a deadly disease called the "milk-sick." Then ten years later his sister died and left him with only his father and stepmother. Lincoln traveled to New Salem in April 1831 and settled there the following July. In the fall of 1836 he and Mrs. Bennett Abell had a deal that if she brought her single sister to New Salem he had to promise to marry her. When ...
    Related: abraham, abraham lincoln, lincoln, john wilkes booth, president johnson
  • Adolescent Abortion - 1,673 words
    ... em. ADOLESCENT ABORTION LEGALIZATION Less then twenty-five years ago, any women who elected to terminate her pregnancy usually had to resort to illegal, unsanitary, and unsafe means. Abortion was frequently considered a criminal offense committed by the woman and the physician performing the procedure. The Supreme Court cases leading to the legalization of abortion began in 1963 with Griswold v. Connecticut. The court invalidated a Connecticut statute that made possession and use of contraceptives by married couples a criminal offense. The case of Griswold was later expanded to encompass the woman's right not only to prevent but also to terminate her pregnancy. In the case of Roe v. Wade ...
    Related: abortion, adolescent, birth control, young woman, fatal
  • Affirmative Action - 916 words
    Affirmative Action Affirmative Action is a policy that is supposed to give minorities ?more? of an equal opportunity. Corporate America and educational institutions claim that they follow the policy of equal opportunity for all, but in reality they don?t. Affirmative Action is just a policy that is not implemented to do what it is supposed to do. I believe Affirmative Action was created to keep people quiet. In Ward Connerly?s essay ?My Fight Against Race Preferences: a Quest Toward ?Creating Equal??, is a clear example of how unequal society is. It also demonstrates how educational institutions do not follow what is preached with Affirmative Action. As a result, not only are blacks and othe ...
    Related: affirmative, affirmative action, court cases, foreign policy, ethnicity
  • Affirmative Action - 1,198 words
    Affirmative Action As Nick Catoggio went to his mailbox, he knew that his acceptance letter from Harvard University had arrived. Although Nick was nervous, he knew that his hard work in high school had gained him admission into one of the worlds most prestigious institutions of higher learning. Because of his grade point average of 4.0 in high school, his numerous extracurricular activities, and a combined score of 1440 on his SATs, Nick believed that he would almost be guaranteed admission to Harvard. When he opened the letter however, he was shattered when he read the words, "We regret to inform you ..." He immediately called his friend Richard Sahk, who had also applied, to tell him his n ...
    Related: affirmative, affirmative action, college admissions, preferential treatment, minority
  • Affirmative Action - 1,168 words
    ... or right, is really a deceptive attempt to constitutionalize gender discrimination and slam shut the doors of opportunity that both women and people of color have fought so hard to open. It places a hurdle to minorities and women that is not placed to others who seek legislation to benefit them. he elimination of affirmative action programs for women and minorities run by the state or local governments in the areas of public employment, contracting, and education that give "preferential treatment" on the basis of sex, race, color, ethnicity, or national origin would have a devastating affect on the minorities in the society but at the same time we need to keep in mind that the common per ...
    Related: affirmative, affirmative action, organizational behavior, washington post, racist
  • Affirmative Action - 687 words
    Affirmative Action Affirmative action is described as the term meant taking appropriate steps to eradicate the then widespread practices of racial, religious, and ethnic discrimination. The history of affirmative action starts a long time before this definition was stated during the early 1960's. It starts back to the Declaration of Independence where it states all men are created equal. It moves toward the Emancipation Proclamation, the 13th, 14th, and 15th Amendments which involved the freeing of slaves, abolishing slavery, conferred citizenship on all persons born in the United States, and guaranteeing voting rights to all citizens. There were also many court cases that helped move forth ...
    Related: affirmative, affirmative action, federal funds, civil rights act, labor
  • Affirmative Action - 1,744 words
    ... from the same communities as their students they will be aware of the problems facing their community and that of their students, that way they can better help theses kids, than someone that lives outside of the children The community and has no idea of the problems they are facing. In 1984 their were seventy-one women professors out of 1,112 (6.4 per cent). They were not however, evenly distributed across subjects and departments, but were concentrated in conventionally female areas. Three out of five professors of library science are women, and five out of seven professors or nursing. Women are also notable represented in education ( seven out of forty-nine professors) and social work ...
    Related: action plan, action program, affirmative, affirmative action, social science
  • Assisted Suicide - 1,054 words
    Assisted Suicide It is upsetting and depressing living life in the shadow of death. Many questions appear on this debatable topic, such as should we legalize euthanasia? What is euthanasia? What is assisted suicide? What is the difference between Passive and Active Euthanasia? What is Voluntary, Non-voluntary and Involuntary Euthanasia? What is Mercy Killing? What is Death with dignity? But if euthanasia was legalized, wouldn't patients then die peacefully rather than using plastic bags or other methods? And unfortunately the list continues. No one denies that there are many vulnerable persons who require the protection of the law. Take, for example, those in a temporary state of clinical de ...
    Related: assisted suicide, physician assisted, physician assisted suicide, physician-assisted suicide, suicide
  • Book Review Of Kozols Savage Inequalities - 1,168 words
    Book Review Of Kozol's Savage Inequalities Jonathan Kozol. Savage Inequalities: Children in America's Schools. New York, Harper Collins, 1991. 262 pp. In this detailed and shocking book, Jonathan Kozol describes the horrific and unjust conditions in which many children in today's society are forced to get their education. Kozol discusses three major reasons for the discrepancies in America's schools today: disparities of property taxes, racism, and the conflict between state and local control. The first of these reasons is that of the differences of available property tax revenues. Kozol discusses the inconsistencies in property tax revenues and the problem that the poorer districts aren't g ...
    Related: book review, jonathan kozol, savage, savage inequalities, york harper
  • Brown Vs The Board Of Education - 1,452 words
    Brown Vs. The Board Of Education Education has long been regarded as a valuable asset for all of America's youth. Yet, when this benefit is denied to a specific group, measures must be taken to protect its educational right. In the 1950's, a courageous group of activists launched a legal attack on segregation in schools. At the head of this attack was NAACP attorney Thurgood Marshall; his legal strategies would contribute greatly to the dissolution of educational segregation. According to U.S. Court Cases the segregation among whites and blacks was a legal law established for almost sixty years in the United States. However, Brown vs. The Board of Education was the turning point in race rela ...
    Related: american education, brown, brown v board of education, public education, third grade
  • Brown Vs The Board Of Education - 1,416 words
    ... abolition of segregation in the school system. Brown and the other black parents testified to the fact that their children were denied admission to white schools. According to Knappman one parent testified: "It wasn't to cast any insinuations that our teachers are not capable of teaching our children because they are supreme, extremely intelligent and are capable of teaching my kids or white kids or black kids. But my point was that not only I and my children are craving light, the entire colored race is craving light, and the only way to reach the light is to start our children together in their infancy and they come up together." (467) With the experience of dealing with many court bat ...
    Related: brown, public education, kansas city, psychological impact, ruling
  • Capital Punishment - 943 words
    Capital Punishment Running Head Capital Punishment Capital Punishment Is Capital Punishment Justified? Ed G. Weathersbee Embry Riddle Aeronautical University Capital Punishment 2 Abstract Capital Punishment is the extreme penalty for crime. Such methods as drowning, stoning, hanging, and beheading have been used to carry out execution of criminals for a great variety of offenses. Modern executions are usually done by means of electrocution, the gas chamber, or a lethal injection of a drug. Hanging is still used in some places, as is execution by firing squad. The question is not how one personally feels about capital punishment, but whether or not capital punishment is justified. I say that ...
    Related: capital punishment, punishment, court cases, american civil, cruel
  • Child Eyewitness Testimony - 1,021 words
    Child Eyewitness Testimony In the last forty years, there has been a shift in courtroom proceedings. Lawyers are not only focusing their evidence on the scientific aspects of an event, but also on those who may have witnessed the actual event as well. Recently, the number of eyewitness appearances in the courtroom has increased, making statements about either a crime or an event that occurred in their presence. But how does the courtroom decide who is a legitimate witness to an event? Too often, age, race, education, and socio-economics play a major role in this decision. Here, we will discuss the age aspect of this problem in terms of child eyewitness testimony and it's implications in the ...
    Related: eyewitness, eyewitness testimony, testimony, knowledge base, the courtroom
  • Civil Rights Movement - 1,376 words
    Civil Rights Movement African Americans have overcome many struggles as well as obstacles in the early years which have still not been terminated. African Americans have fought for freedom from enslavement, the right to earn a living, have land and a job, have equal justice, good quality education, to escape from oppression, the right to self pride and an end to stereotyping. Blacks everywhere got fed up with being treated as if they were inferior and slaves, so they banded together to form a movement. Not just any kind of movement, but a movement that would see victories as well as violence and death. That movement was the Civil Rights Movement. The Civil Rights Movement had a major goal, a ...
    Related: black power movement, civil rights, civil rights movement, constitutional rights, power movement, rights movement
  • Creationism And Evolution - 1,075 words
    Creationism and Evolution For a long time school administrators, teachers, parents and even students have argued for and against the teaching of either creation and/or evolution. Evolution has been taught in many public schools for generations because of the scientific methods and support it has as a scientific theory of how we as humans came to be. Many religions hold different views of how humanity as we know it was created and these people believe that students should be able to hear their side as well. There is one main problem, the separation of church and state and the limits that are set within this statement. Should creation be taught as theory just like evolution? Do other creation ...
    Related: creationism, evolution, evolution theory, scientific basis, court cases
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