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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: country music

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  • Although Musicians Had Been Recording Fiddle Tunes Known As Old Time Music At That Time In The - 4,440 words
    Although musicians had been recording fiddle tunes (known as Old Time Music at that time) in the southern Appalachians for several years, It wasn't until August 1, 1927 in Bristol, Tennessee, that Country Music really began. There, on that day, Ralph Peer signed Jimmie Rodgers and the Carter Family to recording contracts for Victor Records. These two recording acts set the tone for those to follow - Rodgers with his unique singing style and the Carters with their extensive recordings of old-time music. Jimmie Rodgers Known as the "Father of Country Music," James Charles Rodgers was born in Meridian, Mississippi on September 8, 1897. Always in ill health, he became a railroad hand, until ill ...
    Related: country music, music, music hall, recording, rock music
  • Although Musicians Had Been Recording Fiddle Tunes Known As Old Time Music At That Time In The - 4,509 words
    ... ves' career. In 1959, Reeves recorded his all-time greatest hit, "He'll Have to Go." The theme was familiar enough. Some years earlier it might have been called a honky-tonk song. But the treatment, with Reeves' dark, intimate, velvet tones gliding over a muted backing, was something different again. The result brought him instant stardom. During the early 1960s, he also continued to dominate the US country charts, with hits including Guilty (1963), and "Welcome to My World" (1964). Tragically, on a flight back to Nashville from Arkansas on July 31, 1964, Jim and his manager ran into heavy rain just a few miles from Nashville's Beery Field and crashed, killing both men. Voted into the Co ...
    Related: country music, music, music hall, music history, music industry, pop music, recording
  • An Era Of Punk - 1,711 words
    ... harlton, Rock music, 208). Smith also had a new version of the song My Generation in which she shouted obscenities, making it clear to every one that her generation was new and angrier. Most of the Ramones songs did not last more than two minuets, but it was arguably the most exhilarating half-hour in rock and Roll. The Ramones very simple, fast high-energy music and monotone vocals became a prototype for much punk rock to follow (Charlton, Rock Music. 208). The Ramones were the first of the New York Bands to tour extensively, and their appearances in England in 1976 was later cited by many English punk bands as the original inspiration for that countrys do-it-yourself rock revolution. T ...
    Related: punk, punk rock, rock music, music styles, rebellion
  • Biography Report - 320 words
    Biography Report Title: Gold Buckle Dreams Author: David G. Brown Illustrator: Photos courtesy of Pro Rodeo Hall of Fame Publisher: Quinan Press Copyright Date: 1986 This book was written about: Chris Le Doux Who was born on: March 27, 1953 At: Austin, Texas (hometown) born at: Texas Womens Hospital His/ Her parents were: Al and Bonnie Le Doux He/ She attended the following schools: He was taught at home till high school, then he attended Cheyenne Central High School. His/ Her outstanding accomplishments were: Winning many rodeos with a first place ride. Winning the 1976 Pro Rodeo Gold Buckle Recording 16 records, 9 of which went gold and 3 platinum. An experience that changed his/ her whole ...
    Related: biography, country music, central high school, austin texas, copyright
  • Ch Paul Whiteman A Classically Trained Violinist And Violist Who Adored Jazz But Lacked The Gift To Emulate The Uni - 1,031 words
    ... = a declamatory setting of a text, with rhythms and inflections related to those of speech. Aria = a songlike setting, musically expressive, accompanied by the orchestra. Da capo = from the beginning a three-part design. The composer writes the first section and a contrasting middle section of a da capo aria, and the performer repeats the first section with embellishments. Chorus = a large ensemble, with several voices on each part. Libretto = the words of an opera or other dramatic vocal work. Overture = in music theater, an introductory instrumental piece. George gershwin = ansombels. Ch. 18. Drone = a single tone, sounded continuously or repeated. Jimmie Rodgers(1897-1933) = from Mis ...
    Related: gift, jazz, whiteman, american music, elton john
  • Death Penalty - 1,737 words
    Death Penalty In our understandable desire to be fair and to protect the rights of offenders in our criminal justice system, let us never ignore or minimize the rights of their victims. The death penalty is a necessary tool that reaffirms the sanctity of human life while assuring that convicted killers will never again prey upon others. Through the death penalty many families of victims find solace and retribution by seeking to put an end to it all; the sleepless nights, the terrifying nightmares of what their son, daughter, wife, husband, sister, brother, aunt, uncle, cousin or friend went through and the constant reminder of why their loved ones arent with them. In June 1997, a parade of w ...
    Related: death penalty, penalty, baptist church, last time, electrical
  • Free Time - 782 words
    Free Time Free Time The wind is blowing through my hair, I feel as free as a bird. Eminem is blaring and I sing along with the song. These are the best feelings I have. I can leave from work having the worst day of my life and get in my car and everything changes. I feel as if for those twenty-five minutes, my life is at ease. Once I get behind the wheel I drive away from my problems and away from reality. I have mainly one focus and that is to get from point A to point B. While doing so I create mental activities which set my mind at ease. That is why I enjoy being by myself, driving. I drive around sometimes just for the heck of it. Sure, I use up valuable gasoline, but it is all worth it ...
    Related: on the road, make sense, country music, listening, raging
  • History Of The Grateful Dead - 1,969 words
    History Of The Grateful Dead Throughout the years The Grateful Dead was forced to overcome many obstacles to arrive at the point in which they are today. In San Francisco, on August 1, 1942, Jerome John Garcia was born. This marked the beginning of a long strange trip (Mokrzycki 4) Jose Garcia, Jerome's father named his son after his favorite Broadway musical composer, Jerome Kern. Tired of the name Jerome, Jose and his family began to call him Jerry. Garcia was surrounded by music as a child. His father would play him to sleep at night, the clarinet's lovely melodies echoing in Jerry's dreams. His mother listened to opera and his maternal grandmother loved country music. Family gatherings t ...
    Related: history, san francisco, folk music, social values, dana
  • Larry Bird - 1,300 words
    Larry Bird One of the greatest basketball players of all time emerged from the small town of French Lick, Indiana. With a population of 2,059 people, around 1,600 of them came to watch the Valley High basketball games, especially the blond-haired shooting whiz with a funny smile named Larry Joe Bird. Following a sophomore season that was shortened by a broken ankle, Bird erupted as a junior. Springs Valley went 19-2 and young Larry became a local celebrity. Generous fans always seemed to be willing to give a ride to Bird's parents, who couldn't afford a car of their own. As a senior Bird became the school's all-time scoring champion. About 4,000 people attended his final home game. When Bird ...
    Related: bird, larry, boston celtics, front office, hoping
  • Livin On Country - 445 words
    Livin' on Country The Alan Jackson Story Livin' on Country is the complete story of Alan Jackson's journey from small-town Georgia to big time success. Alan represents the simple truths and homespun values that are the heart of country music. With songs that are personal yet universal, his music speaks to fans around the world. Alan has sold millions of albums, records and more than a dozen #1 hits, won numerous Academy of Country Music Awards, and been named Entertainer of the Year by the Country Music Association. There's no denying that Alan Jackson is one of country music's greatest heroes. Country-Western music is the back bone of American life, how you can go from some one who has very ...
    Related: country music, music awards, sunday afternoon, real world, singer
  • Modern Music - 1,591 words
    Modern Music Music has been around for thousands and thousands of years. The caveman had originally started some type of sounds in which branched off into the music that we listen to today. This prehistoric music was started by the cavemen in order for them to express themselves, and the others who listened were affected in the same way that people are affected by music today. For example, if someone is upset they will listen to something that will get them into a better mood, perhaps something mellow or soft. If they are happy, they will listen to something that is more energetic, and so on. After I interviewed four people--friends and family--I found out what type of music they listened to ...
    Related: classical music, country music, modern music, music, rap music
  • Music And Censorship - 1,884 words
    Music And Censorship In our society today, some musicians and their music drain and plague the moral and spiritual well-being of the people; therefore, censorship offers a necessary action that we must take to keep the world from becoming a land of decadence. The musicians lives are not examples for the children or the adults. The lyrics of many songs are not suitable for anyone. All types of music need some kind of censorship. Censorship makes a person realize that music is good for the heart. Censorship totally makes people act better, and when thinking better, this sustains a better society. The lives of some musicians contain types of anarchy and self-gratification. Once the musicians re ...
    Related: censorship, christian music, country music, music, rolling stone
  • Music Defines Dress - 1,497 words
    Music Defines Dress Music Defines Dress Often I have found myself people watching for the amusement of everyday life. Not by luck or sheer investigation, I have noticed something that everyone shares in common guys and girls alike, their personal style of clothing in reflection of their choose in music. I am not talking about or brand names or the clothes make the man, but that of the general appearance of how the individual displays themselves to the world around them. Over the generations people have been influenced greatly by the music that they enjoy. By conscious decisions or not, people tend to dress to the type of music that they enjoy most. Dress and Music are linked by the way of ho ...
    Related: classical music, country music, dress, music, self image
  • Music Writer - 318 words
    Music Writer Music Writer The job of being a music writer entails many things. As most people believe, they do more then criticize artists work. In an email interview between Steven Ward, and David McGee (a music writer), David tells of how he works for BarnesandNoble.com as a country music editor. He states, "What we do at bn.com is not music criticism - because bn.com hopes to sell these albums, the reviews emphasize the albums' positive aspects." This shows us how music writers aren't always criticizing new artists, and old artists. Some jobs require you to do that, such as certain magazines. David McGee also talks about how the best part of his job is being able to interview to artists, ...
    Related: country music, music, music industry, people believe, criticizing
  • Music, Feelings And Arts - 3,003 words
    Music, Feelings And Arts Music is sound arranged into pleasing or interesting patterns. It forms an important part of many cultural and social activities. People use music to express feelings and ideas. Music also serves to entertain and relax. Like drama and dance, music is a performing art. It differs from such arts as painting and poetry, in which artists create works and then display or publish them. Musical composers need musicians to interpret and perform their works, just as playwrights need actors to perform their plays. Thus, musical performances are partnerships between composers and performers. Music also plays a major role in other arts. Opera combines singing and orchestral musi ...
    Related: arts, orchestral music, young woman, rock music, sports
  • Music, Feelings And Arts - 2,952 words
    ... sting section of a work. In most cases, the composer eventually returns to the original key. Another important element of harmony is the cadence. This is a succession of chords that end a musical work or one of its sections. Most pieces of classical music end with a perfect cadence, which consists of a dominant chord followed by a tonic chord. A plagal cadence consists of a subdominant chord followed by a tonic chord. The Amen ending of a hymn is an example of a plagal cadence. Harmony has been a part of Western music for more than 1,000 years. However, Western composers' ideas about harmony have changed considerably over the centuries, particularly their ideas about consonance and disso ...
    Related: arts, southern united, religious music, young people, improvised
  • Poetry - 690 words
    Poetry POETRY REPORT 1. THE DANCE The song The Dance was written by Country Music star Garth Brooks in 1989. To Garth The Dance has many meanings, such as a love gone bad or life. He really thinks that it is about the loss of the people who gave up their life as an ultimate sacrifice. Some of these people are John F. Kennedy and Martin Luther King, Jr. I chose this song because it is one of my favorites and the meaning that it gives to the listener. The meaning is that life is better left to live and chance than to miss everything by not do anything or even living. Throughout the song many of the poetic terms are used. The rhyme scheme that is used is that the first verse has no rhyme in it. ...
    Related: poetry, luther king, john f kennedy, edgar allan poe, chorus
  • Popular Music - 1,773 words
    Popular Music Popular music is: "music that is enjoyed by the largest possible audience." It includes country music, folk music, rhythm and blues ( R & B), musical comedy, jazz, marches, rock n' roll, and ragtime. Popular music is primarily listened to by young people. In his book, Sound Effects, Simon Frith said that popular music has been about growing up, and that it has been like this since the beginning of the century.1 However, the popular music industry is based largely on the sale of records. However, popular music can also do many great things for society. Harry Belafonte once said "A funny thing happened to the world in 1985, it cared."2 In the 1980's, many benefit concerts such as ...
    Related: american music, country music, folk music, music, music industry, popular music
  • Punk Era - 1,708 words
    ... rlton, Rock music, 208). Smith also had a new version of the song "My Generation" in which she shouted obscenities, making it clear to every one that her generation was new and angrier. Most of the Ramones songs did not last more than two minuets, but it was arguably the most exhilarating half-hour in rock and Roll. The Ramones very simple, fast high-energy music and monotone vocals became a prototype for much punk rock to follow (Charlton, Rock Music. 208). The Ramones were the first of the New York Bands to tour extensively, and their appearances in England in 1976 was later cited by many English punk bands as the original inspiration for that countrys do-it-yourself rock revolution. T ...
    Related: punk, punk rock, modern culture, rock & roll, elvis
  • Ray Charles Robinson - 532 words
    Ray Charles Robinson Ray Charles Robinson was born on September 23, 1930 in Albany Georgia. His father was Bailey Robinson, a railroad repair man, and his mother was 'Retha. His father never married his mother. His legal wife was Mary Jane, who also helped to raise Charles. By the time he was three, young Charles was learning to play the piano. When he was five his brother, who was three at the time, drowned. A few months later Charles got the disease that would make him go blind by the time he was seven. After he became totally blind at the age of seven, Charles went to a school for the blind in St. Augustine, Florida, where he learned to play the trumpet, the saxophone, the clarinet, and o ...
    Related: robinson, music history, food poisoning, pepsi cola, ticket
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