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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: counter reformation

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  • Austria 17th 18th Centuries - 945 words
    Austria 17Th & 18Th Centuries Austria Keith Henriques History 21 August 22, 1999 In my paper I will examine the absolute monarchy of Austria during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. I shall focus on the on the power of Austria, its foundation, preservation, and expansion. Lastly I will take into consideration the relationship between the classes, the growth of the power of state institutions, and some of the consequential figures in the evolution of absolute monarchy in Austria. The foundation of absolutism was the theory of the divine right of kings. This theory maintained that the monarch was God's representative on earth. In reality absolutism was a closer working relationship wit ...
    Related: austria, social life, economic stability, property tax, administrative
  • Babylon Fall In Bible And History - 1,223 words
    ... istry began in 1831. Before the time of disappointment in 1844, had been joined by around 300 other ministers. 135,000 people are estimated to have expressed their commitment to the movement. This was a significant part of the population of the United States (ref.#8). Thus 1831 would mark the beginning of the call of the first angel (Rev. 14:6, 7). As the movement was coming to its climax, the Protestant churches began to denounce the new ideas, placing themselves in the position of corrupted Babylon. The second angel's message, therefore, began shortly before the time of disappointment in the fall of 1844. The third angel predicts God's final wrath for those who accepted the beast's mar ...
    Related: babylon, bible, history, holy spirit, before christ
  • Britain And Europe In The Seventeenth Century - 1,595 words
    Britain and Europe in the Seventeenth Century Britain and Europe in the Seventeenth Century J.R. Jones, a Professor of English History in the School of English Studies at the University of East Anglia, England, in Britain and Europe in the Seventeenth Century, has written a very informative and interesting book. Britain and Europe in the Seventeenth Century is a relatively short book that deals with the impact that Britain had on European affairs at the beginning of the seventeenth century. The thesis is basically summed up in the title of the book. To expand on the thesis, Dr. Jones emphasizes the close interdependence of Britain and Europe in the seventeenth century, and shows that events ...
    Related: britain, seventeenth, seventeenth century, world affairs, english revolution
  • Charles V - 2,540 words
    Charles V Emperor Charles V (CHARLES I, King of SPAIN). Born at Ghent, 1500; died at Yuste, in Spain, 1558; was a descendant of the house of Hapsburg, and to this descent owed his sovereignty over so many lands that it was said of him that the sun never set on his dominions. Charles was the son of Philip, Duke of Burgundy, by Joanna, daughter of Ferdinand and Isabella, and Burgundy was the first heritage to which he at his led, on his fathers death in 1506. As he was a minor at that time, his aunt, Margaret of Austria, undertook the regency for him. William of Chivres, his father's chief counsellor, had charge of the prince's household; Adrian of Utrecht, the Humanist and professor of theolo ...
    Related: charles i, charles v, police system, political power, siege
  • El Grecos Toledo - 1,056 words
    El Greco's Toledo High atop a hill of granite, surrounded by the gorge and river Tagus sits the ancient and formidable gothic Cathedral and Moorish palace, Alcazar, of Toledo, Spain. Toledo's skyline has changed little since El Greco immortalized Spain's religious centre in 1597-9(Cardillac 28). El Greco's natural talents, his "schooling," and the flare of his adopted Spain, combined to produce an artistic genius. El Greco's ability to convey manneristic images that were so original in conception and color that the detail gives a miraculous conception of cohesion to the whole work(Wethey 61). When studying this canvas, however, one must examine the passionate, moonlit sky; the artistic licen ...
    Related: el greco, toledo, counter reformation, christ child, monastery
  • Gentle Giants - 1,363 words
    Gentle Giants Michelangelo and Renaissance Religion Michelangelo Buonarroti lived in a time when the medieval aspects of Christianity were overwhelmed by the upheaval of the Reformation. His art portrays this change in religious philosophy by discerning the major trends and objectives of the Renaissance. His works show us...the changing world around him (Richmond 4). In addition, Michelangelo seriously impacted generations of artists to come. The Renaissance was a rebirth that led to new ways of thinking in the sciences, philosophy, and architecture, as well as painting and sculpture (Spence 6). This period of European history, beginning in the fourteenth-century, saw a renewed interest in t ...
    Related: gentle, giants, michelangelo buonarroti, florence italy, flame
  • Martin Luther - 1,334 words
    Martin Luther The Reformation began in October 1517 when Martin Luther wrote his 95 theses. Luther was a well-educated son of a miner who earns the right as a middle class by working hard. Luther became a monk and while sitting in the tower outhouse he was inspired by Romans 1:17 The just shall live by faith alone. This encourages him to challenge the church by using this as his thesis for Luthers theology. In 1521 he was excommunicated but he became a national hero because even though his opinions were not new they gave people new hope. One of the first items he did was to say that the Roman Catholic Church was being an Italian church exploiting the Germans. Since Germany was eager to get r ...
    Related: luther, martin, martin luther, middle class, catholic church
  • Martin Luther Protestant Reformation - 1,678 words
    ... received his priesthood. He was then sent to Wittenberg, where he held the professorship of moral philosophy for a year are so before returning to Efurt. Around 1512, Luther fell into a depression. He was plagued by the feeling that he was unable to fulfill God's wishes. But from this depression sprang illumination. Luther began to develop ideas which would eventually become the groundwork for Protestantism. He saw the theory of original sin and redemption for it as a selfish form of idolatry. He cited Paul's Epistle to Rome as showing God to be a beneficent creator filled with love, not condemnation. The forgiveness of sin wasn't a holy ritual which miraculously wiped away a person's si ...
    Related: counter reformation, luther, martin, martin luther, protestant, protestant reformation, reformation
  • Motet Music - 1,791 words
    Motet Music The genesis of the motet is, like the biblical birth of Eve, a matter of appendage. In the case of Eve, a rib was removed from Adam and fashioned into a women; the motet was a rib added to pre-existing clausulae. James C. Thomson describes this development as follows: In the thirteenth century, perhaps sooner, it became the practice to add a new text to the upper voice of a clausula. The newly worded, was then called motetus. (Thomson, 56) Despite its somewhat haphazard birth, the form was widely accepted. Grout describes its popularity as: Thousands of motets were written in the thirteenth century; the style spread from Paris throughout France and to all parts of western Europe. ...
    Related: century music, church music, music, music history, music styles, renaissance music
  • Nyponies 102396 - 770 words
    NYPonies 10.23.96 AP European History-Unit 3 Essay Mr. Cross What was the impact of the Peace of Westphalia on the political and religious issues within the Holy Roman Empire? The two treaties of Mnster and Osnabrck, commonly known as the Peace of Westphalia, was the culminating element for the Holy Roman Empire in the Thirty Years' War. It established a final religious settlement and provided for new political boundaries for the German states of central Europe. The impact of the Peace of Westphalia was broad and long-standing, as it dictated the future of Germany and ex-territories of the Holy Roman Empire for some time to come. The Peace of Westphalia put down the Counter Reformation in Ge ...
    Related: counter reformation, political boundaries, roman empire, similarly, lutheran
  • Outline On Protestant Reformation - 241 words
    Outline On Protestant Reformation World History Protestant Reformation 1.What was the role of the Catholic church in the Middle Ages before the Reformation? 2. Who was John Wycliffe and what was his impact on the Catholic church? 3. Who was John Huss and what was his impact on the Catholic church? 4. What is a heretic? 5. What happened to John Huss? 6. Who was Martin Luther? 7. What was Luthers belief about eternal salvation? 8. What was the Catholic churchs belief about eternal salvation? 9. What was the sale of indulgences? 10. Explain Luthers Ninety-Five Theses? 11. Why was Luther excommunicated in 1521? 12. What were Luthers three basic beliefs? 13. What was the Edict of Worms? 14.What w ...
    Related: counter reformation, outline, protestant, protestant reformation, reformation
  • Palestrina - 1,562 words
    Palestrina Giovanni Pierluigi da Palestrina The greatest composer of liturgical music of all time, born at Palestrina (ancient Praeneste) in 1514 or 1515, according to Baini, Riemann, and others, according to Haberl, in 1526; died at Rome, 2 February, 1594. His early history is practically unknown. Giusseppi Ottavia Pittoni (1657-1743), in notizie dei maestri di cappella si di Rome che altramontani, 1600-1700, a manuscript in the Vatican, relates that young Pierluigi sang in the streets of Rome while offering for sale the products of his parents farm and that he was heard on such an occasion by the choirmaster of Santa Maria Maggiore, who, impressed by the boy's beautiful voice and pronounce ...
    Related: palestrina, counter reformation, church music, virgin mary, significance
  • Reniassance Ergo - 1,597 words
    Reniassance Ergo The cities of Ancona and Pesaro were each a place of refuge for Marrano Jews in the early sixteenth-century. The Marranos (formally Sephardic and Portuguese Conversos) who settled in the cities of Ancona and Pesaro fled the Iberian Peninsula (Spain and Portugal) in the late fifteenth-century as result of the Spanish Inquisition. Many Jews sought refuge in Renaissance Italy, and initially found acceptance by many of its local inhabitants. Cohabitation was tolerated on a marginal scale upon the arrival of the Sephardic Jews. The two cities Ancona and Pesaro located in Central Italy were similar in that mercantile commerce was the main source of revenue. Large Numbers of Marran ...
    Related: negative effect, renaissance italy, counter reformation, righteous, elevation
  • The Protestant Reformation Vs The Counterreformation - 985 words
    The Protestant Reformation VS The Counter-Reformation ` The Reformation was a movement against the Catholic Church in the early 1500's. The Counter-Reformation was a movement by the Catholic Church to ignite the passion that was once contagious in Europe, but had seemed to die down. In 1483 some would say that the greatest reformer of all time was born. Martin Luther changed the world forever when he posted his 95 theses on the door of the castle church in Wittenburg, Germany. His target audience was mostly the people that were fed up with the Catholic Church's selling of indulgences. While the Catholic Church struggled with its own predicaments, they too fought back to regain their credibil ...
    Related: catholic reformation, counter reformation, protestant, protestant reformation, reformation
  • The Trial Of Galileo - 1,779 words
    The Trial Of Galileo The Trial of Galileo Copernicus's De Revolutionibus of 1543 was dedicated to the Pope; yet ninety years later (1633) Galileo was tried by the inquisition for espousing Copernican views. How did this come about? Prior to the publication of De Revolutionibus, astronomical theories proposed that the earth was the centre of the universe and all the planets revolved around the earth. This was a view that was supported by both Aristotle and Ptolemy although Ptolemy's work was based upon observations and scientific methods as opposed to Aristotle who was in effect theorising based upon religious belief. I shall outline the essential content of the De Revolutionibus and explain ...
    Related: galileo, trial, university press, protestant church, scripture
  • Titians Altarpieces In The Church Of The Frari, Venice - 1,318 words
    Titian's Altarpieces In The Church Of The Frari, Venice Titians Pesaro and Assunta. Altarpieces in the church of the Frari, Venice. What was the importance of these two altarpieces for the development of painting in Venice, both from a stylistic and iconographic point of view? It has been said that Titians Assunta, which adorns the high altar, and Pesaro (on the left aisle of the chapel of the Immaculate Conception) stand mid-way between the past and the future of Venetian painting. This infers that Titian drew on established traditions learnt from his masters Bellini and Giorgione, and imbued his works with a freshness and inspiration not seen before. Furthermore, it becomes apparent that h ...
    Related: christian church, venice, art history, virgin mary, bias
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