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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: cortex

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  • Aggressive Behavior - 1,312 words
    Aggressive Behavior Aggression is a behavioral characteristic that refers to forceful actions or procedures (such a deliberate attack) with intentions to dominate or master. It tends to be hostile, injurious, or destructive, and is often motivated by frustration (The Merriam-Webster Dictionary, 1995). For an individual, aggressive behavior is considered understandable and normal under appropriate circumstances, but when it is frequent, intense, lasting, and pervasive, it is more likely to be a symptom of a mental disorder. Likewise, aggression between groups, can be in the form of healthy competition, but can become harmful when unfair or unjust disadvantage or frustration is perceived, lead ...
    Related: abnormal behavior, aggressive, aggressive behavior, behavioral therapy, social norms
  • Alzheimers Disease - 1,261 words
    Alzheimers Disease Alzheimers Disease We are currently living in the age of technology. Our advancements in the past few decades overshadow everything learned in the last 2000 years. With the elimination of many diseases through effective cures and treatments, humans can expect to live a much longer life then that of their grandparents. The population of the United States continues to rise, and with the baby boom era coming of age, the number of elderly people is rising as well. This increase has brought with it a large increase in diseases associated with old age. Alzheimer's dementia is one of the most common and feared diseases afflicting the elderly community. Alzheimers disease, once th ...
    Related: alois alzheimer, alzheimer's disease, alzheimers disease, different types, psychoactive drugs
  • Alzheimers Disease - 1,539 words
    Alzheimer`s Disease Alzheimers Disease is a progressive, degenerative disease that affects the brain. Individuals with AD experience a progressive and specific loss of cognitive function resulting from the differentiation of the limbic system, association neocortex, and basal forebrain. It is also accompanied by the deposition of amyloid in plaques and cerebrovasculature, and the formation of neurofibrillary tangles in neurons. Alois Alzheimer, a German doctor, diagnosed this disease for the first time in 1907. At that time it was considered a rare disorder. Currently, this tragic brain disorder affects approximately four million people; It is the most common type of dementia and the fourth ...
    Related: alois alzheimer, alzheimer's disease, alzheimers disease, physiological processes, limbic system
  • Alzheimers Disease : Neurobiology, Causes And Treatments Of - 960 words
    Alzheimers Disease : Neurobiology, Causes And Treatments Of Alzheimers disease : Neurobiology, causes and treatments of Alzheimer's Disease (AD) is one of the most common of the dementing illnesses. A progressive, degenerative disease that attacks the brain, causing impaired memory, thinking and behavior. A person with Alzhiemers Disease may experience personality and behavior changes, impaired judgment, confusion and difficulty finishing thoughts, following directions or even finding the right word to say in a conversation. Once advanced the sufferer may require a caretaker as daily chores become very difficult to accomplish. Evidence points toward amyloid as one of the main causes for the ...
    Related: alzheimer's disease, alzheimers disease, diagnosis treatment, main causes, nitric oxide
  • Alzheimers Disease Is A Progressive And Irreversible Brain Disease That Destroys Mental And Physical Functioning In Human Bei - 725 words
    Alzheimer's Disease is a progressive and irreversible brain disease that destroys mental and physical functioning in human beings, and invariably leads to death. It is the fourth leading cause of adult death in the United States. Alzheimer's creates emotional and financial catastrophe for many American families every year. Fortunately, a large amount of progress is being made to combat Alzheimer's disease every year. To fully be able to comprehend and combat Alzheimer's disease, one must know what it does to the brain, the part of the human body it most greatly affects. Many Alzheimer's disease sufferers had their brains examined. A large number of differences were present when comparing the ...
    Related: alzheimer's disease, alzheimers disease, brain, functioning, human beings, human body, parkinson's disease
  • Alzheimers Qa - 932 words
    Alzheimer's Q&A Alzheimer's Disease and Related Disorders Assoc. Inc. 70 E. Lake Street, Suite 600 Chicago, Illinois 60601 What is Alzheimer's Disease? The most common form of dementing illness, Alzheimer's Disease (AD) is a progressive, degenerative disease that attacks the brain, causing impaired memory, thinking and behavior. The person with AD may experience confusion, personality and behavior changes, impaired judgment, and difficulty finding words, finishing thoughts or following directions. It eventually leaves its victims incapable of caring for themselves. What happens to the brain in Alzheimer's Disease? The nerve cells in the part of the brain that controls memory, thinking, are d ...
    Related: chicago illinois, aging process, men and women, nerve, tissue
  • Biology And Human Evolution - 1,381 words
    Biology And Human Evolution Human Biology and Evolution Humans are Alive The earliest human life form can be traced back more than 3.5 billion years ago. Humans are said to be descendants of a single celled ancestor. Although they are different in size and shape all basic functions are alike. The more complex the organization of the cell became the more successful and developed it became. As these single celled organisms developed they became known as pre-humans. We share many characteristics with these pre-humans. Some of these characteristics include the masters of heredity DNA and RNA as well as proteins composed of amino acids, membranes or bound cells and lastly controlled cell division ...
    Related: biology, evolution, human biology, human brain, human evolution, human life
  • Brain Scans Show Pattern In Violent Behavior - 485 words
    Brain Scans Show Pattern In Violent Behavior Murderers and other people prone to violence have distinct brain patterns that can be scanned and that might be changed with drugs and other therapies, researchers said. Most people's brain can rein in overreaction to emotions such as fear or anger. But in pathologically violent people, this control system gets short-circuited. Several studies have shown this rewiring can be seen in images such as PET(positron emission tomography) scans. Impulsive,affective aggression may be the product of a failure of emotion regulation, University of Wisconsin-Madison psychologist Richard Davidson and colleagues wrote in their report, published in journal scienc ...
    Related: brain, violent behavior, research center, positron emission tomography, adaptive
  • Catching Dreams - 746 words
    Catching Dreams Dreams are a window into the mind. These may be our most elaborate, distinctive, revealing, and flamboyant creations; they have fascinated us for thousands of years. The Egyptians built temples for dreaming. The oracles of Greece pondered cryptic dreams as the "royal road to the unconscious." Dreams allow us to view beyond that which we are and know in daily life; they hint of other dimensions of space and time. What do dreams really mean? Are they mirrors of your days, tunnels into pauses of the unconscious, or no more than the chance results of biological changes in the brain? No one knows the complete answer yet, but dream researchers are learning more and more about the r ...
    Related: catching, dream interpretation, dreams, waking life, cerebral cortex
  • Chemistry Research - 2,121 words
    Chemistry Research CHAPTER 32 The tallest tree is the Redwood (Sequoia sempervirens) approx 110 m The tallest Angiosperm is the Australian Eucalyptus regnans Water Uptake and transport (Fig. 32.1) = water is essential because: transport solute, cool the body, photosynthesis and Turgor pressure Osmosis- movement of H2) through a semi-impermeable membrane Osmotic potential ( o)-depend on dissolve solute: Hi concentration means more negative o. Isoosmotic-two solution with same o; Hypoosmotic- solution that has a less negative o(more +) Turgor Pressure -hydraulic pressure result from water up take, cell turgid; analog to air pressure in a tire Water Potential ( )-Overall tendency of a solution ...
    Related: chemistry, respiratory system, nervous system, endocrine system, poison
  • Cocaine Abuse - 909 words
    Cocaine Abuse It is used in offices, parties, on street corners, in homes, and even in schools. With so much widespread abuse, cocaine is in extreme demand. Cocaine abuse has risen 118% since 1990, and continues to rise. Cocaine addiction is easy to understand-- it [cocaine] produces a good feeling, so naturally people would tend to want more of it. The question now though, is how does it produce these feelings, and why is the addiction so strong. By taking a look at cocaine from its entrance into the body, to the end of it's high, and the side effects it produces, the answers to these questions will become clear. When a user takes cocaine the user experiences pleasure beyond what a person u ...
    Related: abuse, cocaine, cocaine addiction, limbic system, side effects
  • Dementiaa - 4,130 words
    Dementiaa IntrodWhat is Dementia ?uction Dementia is an organic brain syndrome which results in global cognitive impairments. Dementia can occur as a result of a variety of neurological diseases. Some of the more well known dementing diseases include Alzheimers disease (AD), multi-infarct dementia (MID), and Huntingtons disease (HD). Throughout this essay the emphasis will be placed on AD (also known as dementia of the Alzheimers type, and primary degenerative dementia), because statistically it is the most significant dementing disease occurring in over 50% of demented patients (see epidemiology). The clinical picture in dementia is very similar to delirium, except for the course. Delirium ...
    Related: thyroid disease, higher level, alzheimers disease, staining, remaining
  • Dementiaa - 3,961 words
    ... re senile plaques (SP) and Neurofibrillary tangles (NFT). There are two types of SP, neuritic and diffuse, both plaques share antigenic determinants with the Beta amyloid 4 protein. Neuritic plaques can be distinguished by their abnormally thickened neurites ( i.e., axons or dendrites) arranged around a central core of amyloid (Mirra & Gearing, 1994). By contrast the diffuse plaques lack the thickened neurites and the amyloid core seen in the neuritic plaques (Mirra & Gearing, 1994). Plaques of both types are found in varying degrees in the neocortex, entorhinal cortex, hippocampus, and in the amygdala. SP also occur in the brains of healthy people. It is only when they exceed a certain ...
    Related: cerebral cortex, nervous system, carbon dioxide, 1984, diagnosis
  • Depression And Suicide In Adolescents - 1,126 words
    Depression And Suicide In Adolescents Depression and Suicide In Adolescents. As a state of extreme grief and all-encompassing sadness, depression, if left untreated, may lead to a deliberate murder of oneself, suicide. Depression effects individuals with out discriminating against race, gender, or age, yet among adolescents, the incidents of depression have increased significantly. Such increase is the potential cause of the rise of suicide rates amidst adolescents. Therefore it is imperative to treat depression before attempts of suicide are made, for if neglected, such attempts could become successful. Through out the years, adolescence has been regarded as the most confusing and difficult ...
    Related: depression inventory, suicide, suicide rates, social interaction, american medical
  • Dreams - 935 words
    Dreams DREAMS Dreaming is an experience that has fascinated people for a very long time. Although researches about dreams have been limited in the past, it has developed tremendously in its field of science. There are many explanations why people dream, but there are three main theoretical explanations for why there is dreaming: the biological view, the cognitive view, and the psychoanalytic view. I will be assessing a dream of my own, using all three perspectives. All three views have been debated thoroughly in the past, but it is the psychoanalytic view that has created the most attention to me. In the end, I will show why I find the psychoanalytic view most valuable. I recently had a very ...
    Related: dreams, make sense, john wiley, psychological association, explaining
  • Dyslexia - 623 words
    Dyslexia annon The problem that effects one out of every ten kidsin the United States of America is dyslexia. Although to some people this disorder may be very noticeable, it can really sneak up on you. Most of the time kids with dyslexia aren't recognized until they are about eight or nine. The most important thing to remember is that is takes time to solve, and sometimes cannot be cured at all. Dyslexia develops during the first six months of gestation . Neurons are churned out in the brain's ventricular zone. Attached to fibers, the neurons travel to the cerebral cortex, which contains the language centers. Here they hit a barrier, stop and take their place in layers above previously depo ...
    Related: dyslexia, theory of relativity, school level, united states of america, albert
  • Effects Of Marijuana - 1,104 words
    ... tute of Drug Abuse are correct, the suppressed neurones of the hippocampus caused by marijuana use, and McCance and Huether's (1998) research into the suppressed neurones of the hippocampus the following can be concluded. Presence of suppressed neurones in schizophrenia patients clearly links the common theory of a cause of drug induced schizophrenia as being contributed to by marijuana use/abuse. According to Continuing Medical Education, Inc. (www.mhsource.com) this is the reason as to why marijuana had the harmful psychological effect of contributing to drug induced schizophrenia on some individuals who are chronic smokers of marijuana. (www.mhsource.com) Chronic abuse of marijuana is ...
    Related: harmful effects, marijuana, psychological effects, term effects, adolescent drug
  • Emotions - 362 words
    Emotions Well in the past it was first thought by a man named Tomkins that emotion actually interfered with basic human drives, like lust and fear. It is known that humans by nature become stimulated by certain variables like a loud noise or possibly the sight of a spider. The question to scientists is whether or not emotion and mood is formed through mind processes or biologically innate traits. Scientists are searching the brain for a particular area that stimulates emotion in humans. They have changed their idea that it might be the hippocampus and now feel that part of it may come from the amygdala. Supposedly when something known by our senses comes in interaction with us, an impulse is ...
    Related: impulse, react, supposedly
  • Emotions - 1,176 words
    Emotions Emotions are part of a management system to co-ordinate each individual's multiple plans and goals under constraints of time and other resources. Emotions are also part of the biological solution to the problem of how to plan and to carry out action aimed at satisfying multiple goals in environments, which are not always predictable. Emotions are based on non-propositional communications that can be called 'emotion signals. An interesting aspect of research is "Can emotions exist and exert influence at the unconscious level?" Freud's view was that emotions could not be unconscious, that their experience is bound with the conscious experience, and that only predispositions towards ce ...
    Related: self concept, verbal abuse, personal experience, insecure, motivating
  • Epilepsy - 855 words
    Epilepsy Epilepsy - The Silent Stalker By Steven Voskanian What is Epilepsy? Epilepsy, also called seizure disorder, chronic brain disorder that briefly interrupts the normal electrical activity of the brain to cause seizures, characterized by a variety of symptoms including uncontrolled movements of the body, disorientation or confusion, sudden fear, or loss of consciousness. Epilepsy may result from a head injury, stroke, brain tumor, lead poisoning, genetic conditions, or severe infections like meningitis or encephalitis. In over 70 percent of cases no cause for epilepsy were identified. About 1 percent of the world population, or over 2 million people, are diagnosed with epilepsy. How th ...
    Related: epilepsy, temporal lobe, young children, medical history, classified
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