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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: corruption

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  • Corruption And Graft - 707 words
    Corruption and Graft Following Reconstruction in the war torn South, and the Sioux Wars in the West, America was enjoying an industrialization period unlike any other. Nearly gone was the frontier, industries coming in, with men gaining unheard of wealth, and having leverage in many affairs. With the Robber Barons in control over the nations economy, and men like Oakes Ames, Leland Stanford, and William Boss Tweed, what occurred is that corruption and graft greatly influenced American industry and business between 1860 to 1900. However, labor organizations such as the Knights of Labor and AFL made steps in labor reforms and other government laws attempted to limit monopolies. Undoubtedly, th ...
    Related: corruption, graft, labor unions, president grant, market
  • Corruption In Denmark - 1,074 words
    Corruption In Denmark Dave Dunphy Integrity in Hamlet Hamlet Drama Assignment Due: April 26, 2000 Passed In: April 26, 2000 Corruption in Denmark In the play Hamlet by Shakespeare, the integrity of some characters are all challenged with honesty and deceit. The King of Denmark is deteriorating and rotting the state and its people. Many images of corruption, spying, and decay compound as the play moves on, because Claudius is trying to find out what his nephew, Hamlet, is planning. A description of some of the points of defilement in detail and what they mean follows. As the scene opens, there is a party, and a party-pooper. The party is somewhat of a classy type, where all the people are dre ...
    Related: corruption, denmark, julius caesar, hamlet horatio, julius
  • Corruption Of Power Was A Very Evident Theme In Both Emperor Jones And Macbeth In Both Plays The Main Character Was Corrupted - 512 words
    Corruption of power was a very evident theme in both Emperor Jones and Macbeth. In both plays the main character was corrupted for different reasons. However, many similarities lie within the storyline which contributed to the downfall of both Jones and Macbeth. In both plays, each character began as "common". Jones was even portrayed to be a criminal at one point in his life. They were brought to power by different reasons. Jones reason was his deception towards his people and Macbeths position was appointed to him. Both of these men continued to strive for absolute power. Their selfish and ambitious nature drove them to be power-hungry. This became the tragic flaw in their character. In bo ...
    Related: corruption, emperor, emperor jones, jones, macbeth, main character
  • Police Corruption - 1,774 words
    Police Corruption Police Corruption Introduction: What is Corruption Corruption can be defined as the misuse of public power for private or personal profit. Corruption can be by people many different ways. One cannot assume that corruption always means the same thing or has the same impact on society (Goldstein). There are two very different types of corruption. The first type occurs where services or contracts are provided according to rule. The second is when transactions are against the rule. In the first type, an officer is receiving private gain illegally for doing something that he or she is ordinarily required to do by law. In the second type, the bribe is paid to obtain services that ...
    Related: corruption, police, police brutality, police chief, police corruption, police misconduct, police officer
  • Police Corruption - 1,690 words
    Police Corruption The police officer stands at the top of the criminal justice system in a nation where crime rates are high and where the demands for illegal goods and services are widespread. These conditions create a situation in which the police officer is confronted with opportunity to accept a large number of favors or grants. Police corruption occurs in many forms and observers of police behavior agree that it falls into nine specific areas. Drug related police corruption differs from other types of police corruption. In addition to protecting criminals or ignoring their activities, officers involved in drug related corruption were more likely to be involved in stealing drugs and/or m ...
    Related: corruption, police, police corruption, police force, police officer, police organization, police work
  • Police Corruption - 723 words
    Police Corruption Police Corruption Police Corruption Corruption in policing is viewed as the misuse of authority by a police officer acting officially to fulfill his/her personal needs or wants. There are two distinct elements of corruption; 1) misuse of authority, 2) personal attainment. The occupational subculture of policing is a major factor in both creating police corruption, by initiating officers into corrupt activities, and sustaining it, by covering up corrupt activities by other officers. Police corruption is a complex phenomenon, which does not readily submit to simple analysis. It is a problem that has and will continue to affect us all, whether we are civilians or law enforceme ...
    Related: corruption, police, police corruption, police department, police officer
  • The Corruption Of Power In Rome - 965 words
    The Corruption of Power in Rome The Corruption of Power in Rome Julius Caesar was murdered on the Ides of March in 44 B.C. by the people he trusted and thought were his friends. The justification for his death was that he was too ambitious and wanted too much power. The very concept of government in Rome was against dictatorship, to which Caesar posed a great threat. Although Rome recognized the need for a distinct leader, the power given to the leader was not absolute. The Romans devised a system to avoid dictatorship and retain freedom, but at the same time maintain control of the affairs of the Empire. These leaders, originally given the title of praetor, meaning "to lead the way" (Asimov ...
    Related: corruption, rome, julius caesar, gaius julius caesar, corrupt
  • The Novel 1984 By George Orwell Is An American Classic That Explores The Human Mind When It Comes To Power, Corruption, Contr - 712 words
    The novel 1984 by George Orwell is an American classic that explores the human mind when it comes to power, corruption, control, and the negative-utopian society. Imagine living in a "world of monstrous machines and terrifying weapons. Warriors fighting, triumphing, persecuting...three million people all with the same face,"(64) and there is the world of 1984, frightening, grotesque, and completely controlled by the ruling Party. Winston Smith is an insignificant member of the ruling Party, in the nation of Oceania. Everywhere Winston goes, even his own home, he is watched through telescreens, and everywhere he looks he sees the face of the Party's omniscient leader, the figure known only as ...
    Related: 1984, american, american classic, classic, george orwell, human mind, orwell
  • The Picture Of Dorian Gray: Corruption Through Aestheticism - 1,416 words
    The Picture of Dorian Gray: Corruption Through Aestheticism The Picture of Dorian Gray: Corruption Through Aestheticism The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde is the story of moral corruption by the means of aestheticism. In the novel, the well meaning artist Basil Hallward presets young Dorian Gray with a portrait of himself. After conversing with cynical Lord Henry Wotton, Dorian makes a wish which dreadfully affects his life forever. "If it were I who was to be always young, and the picture that was to grow old! For that I would give everything! Yes, there is nothing in the whole world I would not give! I would give my soul for that" (Wilde 109). As it turns out, the devil that Dorian ...
    Related: corruption, dorian, dorian gray, picture of dorian gray, the picture of dorian gray
  • 1928 Election - 910 words
    1928 Election AP American History October 21, 1997 The year of 1828 was a tumultuous year in American politics. It so happened that it was a presidential election year. The election of 1828 was different from any other presidential election up to that point. The election not only set a precedent, but was also one of the bitterest in American history. Out of all the elections up to that point, it had all the makings of a present-day campaign. The two modern aspects evident in the campaign were horrific mudslinging and the choice of presidential electors by a popular vote. The two men running for the office of president that year were the incumbent, John Adams, and the once-defeated Andrew Jac ...
    Related: election, presidential election, john adams, current issues, russia
  • 1984 - 957 words
    1984 1984 The story 1984, by George Orwell, is set in the fictional country Oceania, in what is thought to be the year 1984, which consists of the Americas, the British Isles, Australia and part of Africa. The part of Oceania in which 1984 takes place is referred to as Air Strip One and is formerly England. Winston, the protagonist of the story, is faced with a conflict of extreme hatred against the ultimate antagonist, Big Brother. Big Brother is the leader of the political party of Oceania who controls not only actions, but also thoughts through the thought police and what are called "telescreens." Winston falls in love with a girl by the name of Julia, and the two of them must decide on w ...
    Related: 1984, point of view, big brother, official language, brien
  • 1984 By George Orwell 1903 1950 - 1,843 words
    1984 by George Orwell (1903 - 1950) 1984 by George Orwell (1903 - 1950) Type of Work: Futuristic, cautionary novel Setting London, in the mythical country of Oceania; 1984 (in the future) Principal Characters Winston Smith, a rebel against society Julia, his lover Mr. Charrington, an elderly antique shop owner O'Brien, the only member of the Inner Party Winston trusts Story Overveiw As Winston Smith entered his apartment building, he passed a familiar poster. "It was one of those pictures which are so contrived that the eyes follow you about when you move. BIG BROTHER IS WATCHING YOU, the caption beneath it ran." Then Winston opened the door to his flat to be greeted by a voice on his "teles ...
    Related: 1984, george orwell, orwell, political system, totalitarian regime
  • 1984 Vs Animal Farm - 1,278 words
    1984 Vs. Animal Farm 1984 vs. Animal Farm 1984, by George Orwell, is a very powerful drama which involves man and totalitarian society. It is a story of a lonely rebel whose only valuable is his mind and who later conspires with another in an attempt to separate from their increasingly dominant hate-infested society. In 1984, Orwell depicts the susceptibility of today's society and its possibility of becoming a realm of lies. In it, the masses live in constant fear, being monitored at all times. He also admonishes the fact that this society can be in store for us in the future. The main theme of 1984 is that without independent thought and freedom, corruption can and will transform decent or ...
    Related: 1984, animal farm, farm, main theme, leon trotsky
  • 1984 Vs Animal Farm - 1,262 words
    ... n with us. Animal Farm basically deals with how seeking totalitarian power can and will destroy any attempt at revolution and how power can corrupt even the most probable utopias. One night when Farmer Jones has gone to bed drunk, Old Major, the pig in charge of all, assembles all of the animals of Manor Farm to tell them of a dream he had concerning man's and animal's place in life. He points out how animals are literally worked to death by man, who consumes but does not produce, and thus must remove man by means of rebellion. Shortly thereafter, he dies and the animals begin preparation for this Revolution, whenever it may come. When the hungry animals attack and drive off Jones one da ...
    Related: 1984, animal farm, farm, manor farm, encarta encyclopedia
  • A Bet Against Internet Gambling - 1,187 words
    A Bet Against Internet Gambling 07 February 2001 A Bet against Internet Gambling I love gambling. Who doesn't? The minute you walk into a casino you are overwhelmed by exciting noises, flashing lights and people having a good time. There is so much excitement it isn't hard to become addicted, especially after your first big win. The rush you get from winning is something that is hard to parallel. Trust me I know. I almost became addicted. I realized the trouble I was heading for before it was too late. I was a lucky one. Many people aren't as lucky. It is especially easy for people who live very close to a casino to get addicted because it is so easily accessible. Now imagine if everyone who ...
    Related: gambling, gambling impact study commission, internet gambling, internet sites, online gambling
  • A Comparison Of Biographic Features In The Sun Also Rises And The Great Gatsby - 1,226 words
    A Comparison Of Biographic Features In The Sun Also Rises And The Great Gatsby Trevor Bender Mrs. Watkins AP Lit. and Comp April 12th, 2001 The writers F. Scott Fitzgerald and Ernest Hemingway included biographical information in their novels The Great Gatsby and The Sun Also Rises that illuminated the meaning of the work. Although The Sun Also Rises is more closely related to actual events in Hemingway's life than The Great Gatsby was to events in Fitzgerald's life, they both take the same approach. They both make use of non-judgemental narrators to comment on the lost generation. This narrator allows Fitzgerlald and Hemingway to write about their own society. Fitzgerlald comments on the ja ...
    Related: comparison, gatsby, great gatsby, jay gatsby, sun also rises, the great gatsby
  • A Comparison Of Biographic Features In The Sun Also Rises And The Great Gatsby - 1,268 words
    ... doesn't.1) Gatsby is gullible for beliving Daisy when she tells him she loved him, when it is clear to both the reader and nick that her only concern is money and wealth. When she tells him that she loved Tom too, the words seemed to bite physically into Gatsby.2) This shows the romantic idealized views of Gatsby. Hemingway and The Sun Also Rises Like Fitzgerald's, The Great Gatsby, The Sun Also Rises by Ernest Hemingway contains autobiographical features that illuminate the work and add to the meaning of the novel. However, the plot behind The Sun Also Rises is more exactly based on actual events in Hemingway's life than The Great Gatsby was to Fitzgerald's life. Indeed, the entire plot ...
    Related: comparison, gatsby, great gatsby, sun also rises, the great gatsby
  • A Dolls House Henrik Ibsen 18281906 - 1,280 words
    A Dolls House Henrik Ibsen (1828-1906) A Dolls House Henrik Ibsen (1828-1906) Main Characters Torvald Helmer - He is a lawyer who has been promoted to manager in the bank. Nora - She is Torvalds wife who is treated like a child by Torvalds but leaves in the end because of it. Krogstad - He is the man Nora borrowed money from to pay for the trip to Italy. Dr. Rank - He is an admirer of Nora who has spinal TB and announces his death at the end of the play. Minor Characters Christine Linde - She is an old friend of Nora who comes to Nora and asks her to ask her husband for a job. The children - Nora plays with her children and treats them like dolls. Setting Helmers Apartment - The entire play ...
    Related: doll house, dolls house, henrik, henrik ibsen, ibsen
  • A Mind Is The Slave Of Passion Through Its Own Choice - 1,719 words
    A Mind Is The Slave Of Passion Through Its Own Choice While he may best be remembered for his classic autobiography Confessions, St. Augustine was also the author of The Problem of Free Choice, which raises many questions and provides answers for a plethora of questions regarding human life and the ability to think. He titles one of the sections of his book A Mind is the Slave of Passion Through its Own Choice (MS). In this section, he reveals many interesting thoughts on human nature through dialogue between two characters, Augustine and Evodious. (E. and A.) St. Augustine looks to discuss reason, knowledge, the concept of mind and control over it, and passion. The conclusion that is reache ...
    Related: free choice, human mind, passion, slave, st. augustine
  • A Modest Proposal By Swift - 1,196 words
    A Modest Proposal By Swift A Modest Proposal was a satirical essay written by Jonathan Swift depicting the horrific conditions of Ireland and the lives of the Irish people in 1729. The author portrays and attacks the cruel and unjust oppression of Ireland by its oppressor, the mighty English and ridicules the Irish people at the same time. However, Swift's opposition is indirectly presented. Jonathan Swift is able to do so by using the persona, irony, and wit in order to expose the remarkable corruption and degradation of the Irish people, and at the same time present them with practicable solutions to their unscrupulous and pathetic lives. The author uses a satire to accomplish his objectiv ...
    Related: jonathan swift, modest, modest proposal, proposal, swift
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