Research paper topics, free example research papers

Free research papers and essays on topics related to: copyright infringement

  • 24 results found, view research papers on page:
  • 1
  • 2
  • Analysis On Bulgaria - 4,369 words
    ... rry out economic and other activities to satisfy their interests, by mutual aid and co-operation. A co-operative is a legal entity and is deemed a merchant under the Commerce Act. Co-operative members can only be individuals, at least 7 in number. To participate in a co-operative, foreign person should have permanent residence in Bulgaria. Sole Trader - any capable individual, residing in the country, can register as a sole trader. State Companies - they exist under the forms of one-member private limited or joint-stock companies where the quotas/shares are solely owned by the State. These forms of business are established to facilitate the process of privatization of the state companies ...
    Related: bulgaria, special forces, living standards, political parties, branch
  • Boundaries Of Ownership - 2,946 words
    ... Court decision in an earlier case. Blackmun, treading carefully along a fine line between the different kinds of rights accorded to different kinds of owners, stresses that infringement of copyright does not easily equate with theft, conversion or fraud. . . . The infringer invades a statutorily defined province guaranteed to the copyright holder alone. But he does not assume physical control over the copyright; nor does he wholly deprive its owner of its use. While one may colloquially liken infringement with some general notion of wrongful appropriation, infringement plainly implicates a more complex set of property interests than does run-of-the-mill theft, conversion or fraud. Howeve ...
    Related: ownership, technological tools, more important, personal financial, tech
  • Copyright And Patent Fraud - 1,429 words
    ... became involved in this lawsuit with a motorcycle parts and repair shop called the Hog Farm in San Jose, California, in 1991. The Hog Farm owners argued that a hog referred to any large motorcycle. In this case, Harley-Davidson filed for a trademark of the nickname hog, and was able to win the case. (Fritz 30) An article in the Los Angeles Times reports that on July 5th, 1995, Federal agents raided a stuffy yellow warehouse in downtown Los Angeles, where twelve men were cheating the Chanel Clothing Company of large profits. These few men make money by copying Chanel's crossed C logo and selling the fake product with a 500-per cent markup. (Simon A1) Most counterfeiting products tend to ...
    Related: copyright, copyright infringement, fraud, patent, patent laws, patent office, united states patent
  • Copyright Protection - 1,176 words
    Copyright Protection A copyright is the right to produce, reproduce, and transform any original work. Copyrights are only given to original works that fall under the "following seven categories: Literary works, Musical works including accompanying any works, Dramatic works including accompanying music, Choreographic works, Graphical and sculptural works, Motion pictures and other audiovisual works, Sound recordings, and Architectural works"1. Under the Canadian copyright act any published or unpublished original work upon creation will receive automatic copyright protection. Though automatic copyright protection is given to original works the benefits of having ones copyright registered (Cop ...
    Related: copyright, copyright infringement, copyright laws, copyright protection, united states copyright
  • Copyright Protection - 1,181 words
    ... anadas copyright had this case been under U.S jurisdiction the case could have been found not to violate the copyright because of the natured copyrighted work and the parody being completely two different forms of expression one being a dramatic work another being a sound recorded work. Another consideration if this case had been in U.S jurisdiction is that the parody is a derivative work and that the portion of the derivative work is not substantial of the original copyrighted work. On the other side of the argument is that even if this case were held under U.S jurisdiction it would have still resulted in the same judgment. One consideration to promote this argument is that the derivati ...
    Related: copyright, copyright infringement, copyright laws, copyright protection, legal system
  • Hewlettpackard Strategy - 4,037 words
    Hewlett-Packard Strategy Strategy Paper Hewlett Packard, Inc. (NYSE: HWP) TABLE OF CONTENTS SECTION 1 2 BACKGROUND 2 SECTION 2 2 MISSION, GOALS, AND STRATEGIES 2 Company Mission 2 Company Goals 2 Company Strategies 2 Management By Wandering Around. 2 Management By Objective. 2 Open-Door-Policy 2 Open Communication 2 SECTION 3 2 STAKEHOLDERS 2 Stockholders: 2 Employees: 2 Competition: 2 Major suppliers: 2 SECTION 4 2 EXTERNAL ENVIRONMENT 2 Industry Environment 2 Differentiation versus Commodity 2 Capacity versus Demand 2 Entry and Exit Barriers 2 Economic Conditions and Forces 2 Importance of Product 2 Proprietary Knowledge 2 Government Forces 2 Social-Demographic Forces 2 Technology 2 SECTIO ...
    Related: business level strategy, corporate level strategy, level strategy, strategy, sun microsystems
  • I Want My Mp - 679 words
    I Want My Mp3 I Want My MP3 Music is something that can be listened to almost anywhere due to modern technology. When it comes to listening to music while sitting at a computer, controversy arises. People today want to just be able to click the mouse a few times and be able to listen to thousands of different songs. A web site known as Napster is in the middle of a lawsuit with the Recording Industry Association of America, RIAA for short, over their software. This software lets subscribers download all the MP3s they want and do whatever they want with them. The controversy arises when these files are then illegally transferred across the Internet. Many different terms are used to describe w ...
    Related: copyright infringement, northeastern university, modern technology, application, guide
  • Jason Nikouyeh - 1,022 words
    Jason Nikouyeh Professor Willis English 111, Section 133 4 November 1999 Technology is Changing the Way We Listen to Music Downloading MP3s from the Internet should be made legal. An MP3 is a near CD quality digital recording of a musical piece that is compressed so it can be distributed through the Internet (Simple Net). High prices, new technology, and availability are causing most music lovers to turn to the Internet to listen to their music. It's convenient to search a computer database for a song you've been wanting to hear by your favorite artist, download it, and copy it on to a CD. More and more people are doing this because with the help of search engines it's possible to find any s ...
    Related: jason, computer technology, copyright laws, digital music, distributing
  • Jason Nikouyeh - 1,064 words
    ... illenium Copyright Act, were enacted to protect against indirect copyright infringement (7). There is virtually no way to enforce copyright laws on MP3s because it's so easy to indirectly violate them. When considering what the Internet is, a vast collection of information interconnected for the public, the need for safe harbors becomes apparent. However, it's these same safe harbors that provide ways to escape liability when an individual does violate copyright laws. Web pages are connected through hyperlinks and search engines so even though a web site might not contain MP3s, it can be linked to other web pages that do (9). This makes it difficult to zero in on the web site that is vio ...
    Related: jason, industry association, recording industry, internet service, shaking
  • Microsoft - 1,510 words
    Microsoft MICROSOFT Briarcliffe College Microsoft Corporation, leading American computer software company. Microsoft develops and sells a wide variety of computer software products in more than fifty countries. Microsoft's Windows operating systems for personal computers are the most widely use operating systems in the world. Microsoft had revenues of $14.4 billion for the fiscal year ending June 1998, and employs more than 27,000 people in 60 countries. Microsoft has it's headquaters in Redmond Washington. Microsoft's other well known products include, Word, a word processor; Excel, a spreadsheet program; Access, a database program; and PowerPoint, a program used for making business present ...
    Related: microsoft, microsoft corporation, microsoft office, microsoft word, executive vice
  • Mp And The Music Industry - 1,254 words
    Mp3 And The Music Industry Imagine a world where you did not go to the music store and buy a CD. You would have $15 extra in your pocket every time. Now you ask 'why would I not go out and buy CD's? I like to hear groups I like'. The answer is simple. There is something new out there in the world that makes it possible for you to never buy a CD again. There is only one catch: it's illegal. Illegal in the sense that you are committing copyright infringement every time you participate in this new format. Mp3 is this file format. Ever since CD drives were put into computers, people have recorded songs into their computers to listen to while they worked. The quality was decent to horrible, depen ...
    Related: industry association, music, music industry, recording industry, copyright infringement
  • Mp Piracy - 1,064 words
    Mp3 Piracy In this digital world, the idea of obtaining any materialistic pleasures with a computer is simply amazing to me. It initiates an already growing problem with scarcity and unlimited wants. The fact that everyone with a computer could have free music all the time is quite appealing? Of course, as with anything else, there are limits to what enjoyment we can have by suggesting that we are being morally judged. This seems to be the hidden question behind all the other piracy-related jargon. MP3 piracy and the moral fibers that bind us together are changing our lives right in front of us, while technology is bringing us closer realizing it. Those who produce intellectual property and ...
    Related: piracy, copyright protection, music industry, international federation, stein
  • Mp3s: Friend Or Foe - 1,404 words
    ... ies mentioned before. Larry Miller of Reciprocal Music claims like dinosaurs, recording companies will be rendered extinct when asked about the future of retail music . He also says that the retail business is going to look totally different than the way it currently is today, he adds by saying, "Is that necessarily bad? I think it's just called evolution of business. The best of them will get better. The worst of them will go away." The people that get hurt most by this phenomenon is the struggling artists who try to strike deals with recording companies that are not into the digital age, rather then the ones who have a fan base of cyber surfers and can rely on them for sales. The users ...
    Related: online music, time warner, first half, accord, outline
  • Napster - 705 words
    Napster Napster is an on-line Internet site, which holds account for the swapping of music files from one user to another. A person downloads music onto his or her computer and whoever enters the Napster website can copy the music onto a disk for their own listening enjoyment. This sounds quite simple, doesn't it? Well, according to music artists such as Metallica and Dr. Dre and also the RIAA, Recording Industry Association of America, it is contributing to massive levels of copyright infringement with its service (Borland). However, most people believe that it is a legal business that is linked with the First Amendment and fair use principles where consumers have the right to record for no ...
    Related: napster, usa today, recording industry, daily news, consumers
  • Napster: First Amendment Right - 647 words
    Napster: First Amendment Right? Napster: To Be or Not To Be Napster ( is a company that operates exclusively online as a virtual music forum. Napster not only allows its visitors the ability to participate in ongoing discussions through its message board forums and online virtual chat rooms, but it also allows its visitors the capability to exchange music files (MP3s) with other Internet users. Because Napster is a virtual online public forum, Napster should be protected under the First Amendment. Under the First Amendment, we the people, are protected by these rights of freedom of speech and assembly. The idea of people coming together in one specific area of the Inte ...
    Related: amendment, first amendment, internet users, message board, copyright
  • Napster: The End Or Merely The Begining - 1,344 words
    Napster: The End Or Merely The Begining Napster: The End or Merely the Beginning If you haven't heard of Napster before you should be asking yourself what planet you're from? From when it first was programmed by 19 year old Shawn Fanning, people could tell it was going to be a big success. And it was, spreading like a fire and causing all kinds of media hype as well as causing its share of various legal problems. So if you have been living in a cave or another planet I'll try to explain Napster to you as best as I can. Napster allows you to log onto the Internet and search (like a search engine only more refined) for songs in mp3 format (the digital form of music). You can type in the name o ...
    Related: begining, circuit court, chat room, operating systems, maker
  • Napstercom - 1,226 words
    Napster.Com The Napster software (, launched early in 1999, allows internet users to share and download MP3 files directly from any computer connected to the Napster network. The software is used by downloading a client program from the Napster site and then connecting to the network through this software, which allows sharing (uploading and downloading) of MP3 files between all users connected to the network. While Napster does not condone copyright infringement, there is no opportunity in the software to stop this, or for royalties to be paid to artists whose songs are being duplicated for free. Unlike similar file-sharing applications (Gnutella, Freenet) ...
    Related: industry association, millennium copyright, recording industry, file, commercially
  • Pretty Good Privacy - 1,301 words
    Pretty Good Privacy PGP stands for "Pretty Good Privacy." It is an encryption program. What encryption does is hide information from people who do not know the "secret word" to reveal the information. Louis J. Freeh, the Director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, says the honest have nothing to hide, and only criminals would use encryption. The honest, goes the implication, have no need of encryption. Let us think about that, for just a minute. The honest have no need of encryption: they can live completely open lives, and this is desirable. Their virtue is their defense. This is an attractive argument, but let us see where it takes us. By this same reasoning, the honest have no need o ...
    Related: pretty good privacy, privacy, legal process, copyright infringement, lawful
  • Scholarly Legal Writing - 1,482 words
    Scholarly Legal Writing The education of lawyers must not merely involve the acquisition of knowledge and skills; it must include the cultivation of creative thinking and imagination, the appreciation of the commonality of the human condition, and development of a sense of judgment and responsibility. Hence, lawyering includes the ability to understand and critique existing and emerging visions of the profession in relation to interdisciplinary and multicultural perspectives, the implications of technology, and the consequences of economic globalization.# As the preceding quotation suggests, legal scholarship has a major impact on the future of the profession. The future of any legal student ...
    Related: effective writing, scholarly, writing process, writing skills, writing style, writing techniques
  • Software Licensing In 1993 Worldwide Illegal Copying Of Domestic And International Software Cost 125 Billion To The Software - 1,865 words
    Software Licensing In 1993 worldwide illegal copying of domestic and international software cost $12.5 billion to the software industry, with a loss of $2.2 billion in the United States alone. Estimates show that over 40 percent of U.S. software company revenues are generated overseas, yet nearly 85 percent of the software industry's piracy losses occurred outside of the United States borders. The Software Publishers Association indicated that approximately 35 percent of the business software in the United States was obtained illegally, which 30 percent of the piracy occurs in corporate settings. In a corporate setting or business, every computer must have its own set of original software an ...
    Related: business software, computer software, copying, illegal, licensing, pirated software, software
  • 24 results found, view research papers on page:
  • 1
  • 2