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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: conviction

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  • 100 Years Of Degradation - 1,060 words
    100 Years Of Degradation Students were assigned this essay as an inside look at oppression and racism from the last one hundred years, told by two elderly ladies in the book, Having Our Say. 100 Years of Degradation There are several books that have to be read in English 095. Having Our Say is one of them. My advice is to read this book while you are still in 090 or 094, just to get the advantage. These are some things that you will discover in this extraordinary biography. This book is tough to take as humorous, because its heart-wrenching to look at racism in America, but Having Our Say, manages to pull off the feat. Having Our Say really makes you think and tries to somehow reflect on the ...
    Related: degradation, public school system, rights movement, school teacher, negro
  • 12 Angry Men - 801 words
    12 Angry Men Every person may have his own way of defining the term "reasonable doubt." In the play "Twelve Angry Men", by Reginald Rose, one juror, number Eight, stands alone against 11 others to convince them that the boy is not guilty. He looks beyond the given testimonies in order to give the boy a fair trial, though this is more then the others think the boy deserves. If the jury finds a "reasonable doubt", it must declare an innocent verdict. A young man stands accused of fatally stabbing his father, and his fate now lies in the hands of his "peers:" 12 men from all walks of life, each with his own agenda, fears and personal demons. At first, based on their conversation, it seems that ...
    Related: angry, twelve angry, reasonable doubt, reginald rose, cars
  • 13 Were The Elizabethans More Bloodthirsty Or Tolerant Of - 1,210 words
    ... repulsiveness. His is a Dionysianism so passionately self-serving, so deliberate if not cold-blooded, that, corrosive rather than life-giving like the Dionysian at its best, it turns all not only to destruction but to cheapness, ignominy, pointlessness. -Theodore Weiss, The Breath of Clowns and Kings, 1974 - The great stories of murder are about men who could not have done it but who did. They are not murderers, they are men. And their stories will be better still when they are excellent men; not merely brilliant and admirable, but also, in portions of themselves which we infer rather than see. Richard is never quite human enough. The spectacle over which he presides with his bent back a ...
    Related: romeo and juliet, executive committee, the merchant of venice, artist, coriolanus
  • 5 Most Influential People In American History - 1,556 words
    5 Most Influential People In American History The United Sates has had a short yet complex history in its two hundred and twenty-four years. She has produced millions and millions of great individuals. These great minds have shaped what America is today. Others, however, have personally molded this magnificent nation with their own acts. John Adams, Thomas Jefferson, John Marshall, Henry Clay and Andrew Jackson are the most influential builders of the United States of America. John Adams was born loyal to the English Crown but evolved into the second President of the Free World. As a lawyer, Adams emerged into politics as an opponent of the Stamp Act and was a leader in the Revolutionary gro ...
    Related: american, american congress, american history, american revolution, american system, history, influential
  • A Comparison Of Freud And Fromm - 1,277 words
    A Comparison Of Freud And Fromm Sigmund Freud was born in Monrovia on May 6,1856. He entered the University of Vienna in 1873 at the age of 17. He finished his degree in 1881. Freud died in England in 1939. He was an active therapist, theorist and writer to the very end. ( Ewen 19-20) Erich Fromm was born four years after Freud in 1900 in Frankfurt, Germany. Unlike Freud, Fromm had no medical training in his background. He received his PHD from the University of Heidelberg and later studied at Berlin Psychoanalytic Institute. Erich Fromm died March 16, 1980 in Switzerland. (Ewen 187) While Freud and Fromm were contemporaries and shared some basic beliefs, their approach to most issues varied ...
    Related: comparison, erich fromm, freud, fromm, sigmund freud
  • A Dolls House - 1,195 words
    A Doll's House The events begin to succeed each other more and more rapidly and the circle begins to spin around her. We find that, for saving her husbands life, Nora has committed forgery and Krogstad is ready to use this information in order achieve his goals : ()if I produce this document in court, youll be condemned.(791) This element gives us a hint of women condition in a deeply- rooted man thought society . In addition, Dr. Rank, who had a lethal disease, confesses his love for her : You know now that Im at your service, body and soul.(802) All these events make the circle tighten and spin faster around Nora, who can hardly resist to this pressure and seeks the relief in wildly danci ...
    Related: a doll's house, dolls house, dr. rank, main character, dream
  • A Rose, By A Vulcan Name, Would Smell As Sweet - 1,201 words
    A Rose, By A Vulcan Name, Would Smell As Sweet A Rose, By a Vulcan Name, Would Smell as Sweet. Social commentary is dangerous. In addition to risking social and political censure, the commentator must carefully convey the message. In directly addressing a problem, one risks alienating an audience before making one's point. If one indirectly approaches said problem, one may appear to lack conviction or a point. Star Trek: the Original Series takes a third path, that of allegory. Unfortunately, as the television series belongs to the science fiction genre, its social significance is often disregarded. However, upon examination, it is clear that the veiled nature of commentary in Star Trek is v ...
    Related: smell, sweet, time magazine, social situations, intolerance
  • A Tale Of Two Cities Two Cities - 1,154 words
    A Tale of two cities - Two Cities Two Cities Jarvis Lorry, an employee of Tellson's Bank, was sent to find Dr. Manette, an unjustly imprisoned physician, in Paris and bring him back to England. Lucie, Manette's daughter who thought that he was dead, accompanied Mr. Lorry. Upon arriving at Defarge's wine shop in Paris, they found Mr. Manette in a dreadful state and took him back to London with them. Mr. Manette could not rember why he had been imprisoned, or when he was imprisoned. He was in a state of Post Tramatic Stress Dis-order. All the years of imporisonment led to his insanity, his life was in danger almost every second of his imprisoned life. In 1780, five years later, Lucie, Mr. Lorr ...
    Related: tale, tale of two cities, central idea, prison experience, imprisonment
  • Aaron Feuerstein - 1,889 words
    Aaron Feuerstein In this paper I will discuss Aaron Feuerstein, the third-generation president and CEO of Malden Mills Industries, Inc., who leads the Lawrence, Massachusetts business with his father's and grandfather's values: kindness, justice and charity. He does this through his charismatic leadership and vision, which binds his employees together into realizing and achieving the same goal. I will show exactly what makes him a leader in the modern business setting and explain why a leader's vision is important in defining a true innovator, effective manager and charismatic leader. Feuerstein and Malden Mills had a history of taking care of its employees. Workers' salaries average $12.50 ...
    Related: aaron, wall street, modern business, management style, characteristic
  • Abortion - 1,190 words
    Abortion Almost half of American women have terminated at least one pregnancy, and millions more Americans of both sexes have helped them, as partners, parents, health-care workers, counselors, friends. Collectively, it would seem, Americans have quite a bit of knowledge and experience of abortion. Yet the debate over legal abortion is curiously abstract: we might be discussing brain transplants. Farfetched analogies abound: abortion is like the Holocaust, or slavery; denial of abortion is like forcing a person to spend nine months intravenously hooked up to a medically endangered stranger who happens to be a famous violinist. It sometimes seems that the further abortion is removed from the ...
    Related: abortion, abortion debate, legalizing abortion, nineteenth century, control laws
  • Accomplice Liabilty - 2,666 words
    Accomplice Liabilty Questions Presented 1. Whether a person in Alaska can be charged as an accomplice to an unintentional crime, when Alaskan courts required that one must have the specific intent to promote or facilitate the offense? 2. Whether the mother was the legal cause of her children's death, when she permitted the father to take the children in his car when he was drunk? Statement of the Case The appellant, Elaine Benis, was indicted in the County of Norchester, on one count of manslaughter, pursuant to A.S. 11.41.120. (R. at 1.) She was also indicted for one count of accessory to manslaughter, pursuant to A.S. 11.41.120 and A.S. 11.16.110. (R. at 1). After the presentation of the p ...
    Related: oxford dictionary, drunk driving, supreme court, traffic, commission
  • Accomplice Liabilty - 2,655 words
    ... er to determine the legislative intent behind this statute. There is no concrete history for the present code but the court relied on commentary from the tentative draft of the Alaska Criminal Code revision. The commentary states, "Subsection (2) codifies the current case law that one is liable as a traditional 'accomplice' if he acts 'with intent to promote or facilitate the commission of the offense'." Alaska Criminal Code Revision Part II, at 31 (Tent. Draft 1977) (citations omitted) quoted in 818 P.2d 691, 692. This comment is persuasive because prior to the revision every time the Supreme Court of Alaska defined the mens rea requirement for an accomplice it stated that one has to ha ...
    Related: criminal law, criminal case, drunk driving, alaskan, requirement
  • Adoption And Identity Formation - 994 words
    ... y, the adopted child must struggle with the competing and conflictual issues of good and bad parents, good and bad self, and separation from both adoptive parents and images of biological parents. If all adoptions were open, the adoptee would have the ability to know about the traits of each family. He would have an easier task of forming an identity for himself, rather than struggling with the issues of to whom he can relate. If the adolescent has some information about his birth parents, such as ethnicity, socioeconomic status, and religion, Horner and Rosenberg (1991) believe that the following can happen: From the bits of fact that they possess, adopted children develop and elaborate ...
    Related: adoption, formation, identity formation, life cycle, family life
  • Adult Illiteracy - 3,413 words
    Adult Illiteracy Learning to read is like learning to drive a car. You take lessons and learn the mechanics and the rules of the road. After a few weeks you have learned how to drive, how to stop, how to shift gears, how to park, and how to signal. You have also learned to stop at a red light and understand road signs. When you are ready, you take a road test, and if you pass, you can drive. Phonics-first works the same way. The child learns the mechanics of reading, and when he's through, he can read. Look and say works differently. The child is taught to read before he has learned the mechanics the sounds of the letters. It is like learning to drive by starting your car and driving ahead. ...
    Related: adult, adult literacy, illiteracy, attention deficit, young people
  • Aesthetics - 714 words
    Aesthetics 1.To try to explain how and why aesthetics is understood, as a philosophical endeavor should first start with what I think and feel through my learning experiences what is art. Art for me is what is pure about the art form and what makes it beautiful. Beauty in art is what enhances individual senses to makes us feel all our senses are united as one. When these traits come together you are in presence of a work of art in my mind and the definition of aesthetics in art. I feel that the reason aesthetics is understood as a philosophical endeavor is because we as a society need to put a label on or problems to help develop a strategy that will help conquer these problems. So to start ...
    Related: real world, different approaches, written language, metaphysics, conquer
  • Against Capital Punishment - 1,191 words
    ... uggests that rather than deterring homicide, state executions may actually increase the murder rate. This phenomenon has been named the brutalization hypothesis. It suggests that through suggestion, modeling, or by legitimizing killing, homicide numbers increase. In a study taken from 1957 to 1982 by Isaac Ehrlich, the number of executions in 1957 was 65 and the number of murders was 8,060. From 1958 to1960 the execution rate stayed roughly the same, but the murder rate increased (Bender& Leone, 1986, p. 99-100) (Vila & Morris, 1997, p.223). Throughout the remainder of the study the execution rate dropped and the murder rate continued to increase. In 1981 the murder rate was at 22,520 a ...
    Related: capital murder, capital punishment, punishment, first year, african american
  • Agression - 2,144 words
    Agression Aggression Aggression is a critical part of animal existence, which is an inherent driving force to humans, as we, too, are animals. The source of aggression within humans is a long summative list, but before trying to understand its source one must apply a working definition of aggression. Aggressive behavior is defined by Encyclopedia Britannica as any action of an animal that serves to injure an opponent or prey animal or to cause an opponent to retreat. (7) David G. Myers states that aggression is any physical or verbal behavior intended to hurt or destroy.(9) There are many types of aggressive behaviors, which can be differentiated from the factual act to the hidden motives. F ...
    Related: agression, slave labor, final solution, verbal behavior, track
  • Aids Conspricay Is Aids Biological Warfare - 3,107 words
    Aids Conspricay - Is AIDS Biological Warfare? Refinance now homeowner even if you have bad credit. 185 loc Aids Conspricay - Is AIDS Biological Warfare? The following is a complete verbatim transcription from a recent broadcast of "Network 23", a program shown on a local Los Angeles Public Access Cable Channel. Good evening, I'm Michel Kassett. This is Network 23. A couple of weeks ago we had a program on the subject of AIDS, addressing the question of whether AIDS-the AIDS virus-was created by the government; and I'm sure that some people were quite shocked by what they heard. We spent that entire program relating to you the evidence of a very substantial amount of factual evidence which su ...
    Related: aids, aids research, biological, biological warfare, warfare
  • Air Traffic Strike - 4,516 words
    ... emands rested upon prevailing norms of workers' interests and power. Since World War II, labor leaders have placed a disproportionate amount of emphasis on economic gains, and the collective bargaining process has gravitated toward these areas. At the same time, management has carefully guarded its prerogatives from the bargaining process.24 In this context, it seems likely that in envisioning a future strike, controllers felt that wages could and should be one aspect of it. Yet wages were not the decisive factor for most, and their other demands, derived from a far more vital, ideological interest than economic gains, evoked their passionate and surprisingly unified response. Individual ...
    Related: strike, traffic, traffic control, traffic controllers, worlds apart
  • Al Capone - 1,357 words
    Al Capone Organized crime was not so organized up until the 1920s. When the 1920s arrived, the American lifestyle changed dramatically. People started investing money in home appliances and automobiles, womens skirts became higher and drinking became very popular. Also, organized crime came to a rise in the 1920s. And in the high ranks of organized crime was Al Capone. Al Capone ran many illegal businesses including bootlegging, gambling, prostitution, and murders. There were many gangs in the world of organized crime and Al Capones was at the top. Al Capone was the most infamous gangster in the 1920s. Being a big time gangster was big business. Money was made fast and very easily. Bootleggi ...
    Related: alphonse capone, capone, world series, racial issues, fixing
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