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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: contemporary

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  • Battered Womens Syndrome: A Survey Of Contemporary Theories In 1991, Governor William Weld Modified Parole Regulations And Pe - 1,755 words
    ... s theory, explaining help organizations are too overwhelmed and limited in their resources to be effective and therefore do not try as hard as they should to help victims. Whatever the case may be, the researchers argue that we can better understand the plight of the battered woman by asking did she seek help and what happened when she did, rather than why didn't she leave. Because the survivor theory of learned helplessness attributes the battered woman's plight to ineffective help sources and societal indifference, a logical solution would entail increased funding for programs in place and educating the public about the symptoms and consequences of domestic violence. There are battered ...
    Related: battered women, contemporary, governor, modified, parole, survey, weld
  • Biblical And Contemporary Problemssolutions In Sermons - 1,560 words
    Biblical And Contemporary Problems/Solutions In Sermons Unit Assignment #1 Preaching Today Tape 3830 Dr. Louis H. Evans Jr. How To Handle Anger 1 Sam. 18:1-7 In this sermon Dr. Evans discusses what anger is and how it can and does affect our lives. He first states the root causes of anger, frustration, disappointment, and resentment. He then goes on to describe how anger if left unresolved affects every aspect of our lives from the physical to the spiritual and how this anger, if left unresolved, leads to serious health problems and spiritual danger. Dr. Evans speaks about several different ways that we handle anger both constructive and destructive. He further expound that by handling our a ...
    Related: biblical, contemporary, kingdom of god, different ways, wood
  • Catcher In The Rye The Contemporary Enlightened One - 498 words
    Catcher in the Rye - The Contemporary Enlightened One J.D. Salinger is considered one of the most critically reviewed author in modern literature. In particular his only novel Catcher in the Rye has received the most criticism. The book has been constantly debate and sometimes banned in some states because of its vulgar language and sexual content. On the other hand it is used in freshmen English and praised as the greatest book in the twentieth century. Catcher in the Rye has been reviewed in many aspects. People had drawn many conclusions in trying to decipher the meaning of Catcher in the Rye and the mind behind the mysterious Salinger. Buddhism is one apparent aspect in this book and it ...
    Related: catcher, catcher in the rye, contemporary, enlightened, the catcher in the rye
  • Contemporary China - 1,276 words
    Contemporary China Contemporary China The Republic of China has undergone many dramatic changes within a relatively short period of time. After centuries operating in the relative stability of Confucian ideals and tradition, Chinese society has been bombarded by the inflow of western ideals and commercialism. In his book Streetlife China, Michael Dutton makes observations concerning contemporary Chinese society and discusses the problems and advantages rapid economic development has brought upon China. Dutton's view on contemporary China is that of a society whose historical ideology contradicts the product of a capitalistic society. Dutton believes that Chinese society is conflicted between ...
    Related: china, contemporary, contemporary chinese, chinese society, foreign trade
  • Contemporary Design - 490 words
    Contemporary Design Contemporary design is usually client based. The designer usually focuses on the presentation of ideas and statements through the collection rather than designing for any specific occasion. Contemporary design is more conceptual, because of this I am going to concentrate on the concepts and imagery associated with the idea of modern, futuristic clothing. As I begin to think about this I will have to consider the client. Designers these days rely on celebrities, socialites and fashion icons to publicise their clothing. For example, a lesser known designer could shoot to fame should an A-list celebrity wear one of their creations to a party or premier. Recently, fashion has ...
    Related: contemporary, modern design, avant garde, more important, clothes
  • Televised Debates Between The Nominees Of The Two Major Parties Have Become Standard Fare In Contemporary Presidential Electi - 215 words
    Televised debates between the nominees of the two major parties have become standard fare in contemporary presidential election campaigns. The authors of this important volume maintain that television has altered the very nature of presidential debates profoundly, that the demands of television have dictated the structure and formats of contemporary debates, and that the visual content of presidential debates plays an important role in the way that candidates exercise influence in televised debates. This important work employs a television perspective in examining the sponsorship, formats, nature, and impacts of presidential debates, stressing the 1960, 1976, 1980, 1984, and 1988 debates. Th ...
    Related: contemporary, presidential, presidential debates, presidential election, televised
  • The Sung Dynasty - 568 words
    1. The Sung dynasty was considered a Golden Age in Chinese history. During this dynasty, the economy expanded and China became the leading economic force in East Asia. As the center of agriculture moved to rice crops in southern China, a new strain of rice and new irrigation techniques allowed the Chinese to harvest two crops of rice a year. This surplus allowed more people to pursue the arts, learning and trade. Foreign trade increased with traders coming from far and wide to China. The Chinese built new types of ships that were better and their goods were traded to distant lands. Among these fine goods were porcelain items, which the Chinese perfected and was said to be the worlds best. To ...
    Related: dynasty, sung, sung dynasty, chinese history, foreign trade
  • 1984 By George Orwell - 983 words
    1984 By George Orwell "War is peace. Freedom is slavery. Ignorance is strength." This is the slogan of the Ministry of Truth, a branch of the totalitarian government in post-war London. The figurehead of this government is Big Brother, who employs a vast army of informers called the Thought Police who watch and listen to every citizen at all times through a device called a telescreen for the least signs of criminal deviation or unorthodox thoughts. This novel, like Orwells earlier work Animal Farm and Aldous Huxleys Brave New World, is an example of anti-utopian fiction, that kind of fiction which shows man at the mercy of some force over which he has no control. Anti-utopian novels are usua ...
    Related: 1984, george orwell, orwell, brave new world, human experience
  • 2001 A Space Odyssey - 1,265 words
    2001 A Space Odyssey 2001 : A Space Odyssey. I am going to be talking about Stanley Kubricks '2001: a space odyssey', focusing (obviously) on the music, but also the sound. I will also be incorporating elements from Mark Millers article "2001 - a cold descent" 2001: A Space Odyssey, introduced in 1968, is a high concept production that begins by tracing the 'Dawn Of Man', which eventually leads to a journey through the solar system by a crew of astronauts aboard a spaceship bound for Jupiter. The accompanying soundtrack plays as much of a role in the development of suspense and intrigue as the actors performances. Three decades later, the soundtrack remains one of the most recognized in cine ...
    Related: odyssey, space odyssey, space station, sound effects, ridley scott
  • 51000 - 994 words
    5/10/00 Globalization and Ideal Landscapes Globalization is a broad term that has several meanings to different factions, cultural Groups and nations. For our purposes globalization refers to the loss of time and space through the rapid development of technologies. It also refers to a world in which all nations and peoples are directly or indirectly connected through the international economy and world politics. This rapid trend toward a globalized world has seen supporters from both the first world financial sectors and the mass producing agricultural sector. Its main detractors have been environmentalists and the indigenous peoples who are adversely affected by the encroaching nature of gl ...
    Related: point of view, computers and the internet, indigenous people, landscape, supporters
  • A Birth Of A Nation The Bicycle Thieves - 1,300 words
    A Birth Of A Nation - The Bicycle Thieves In that paper, I will try to compare two films which are A Birth of a Nation directed by D.W.Griffith and The Bicycle Thieves directed by De Sica. After giving the story of the films, I will try to explain their technical features and their similarities. A Birth of a Nation by D. W. Griffith Griffith can be seen as the first 'modern' director, his greatest achievements being the historical epics The Birth Of A Nation. When it was released, it was one of the longest films ever made, over three hours in length. The prologue depicts the introduction of slavery to America in the seventeenth century and the beginnings of the abolitionist movement. The maj ...
    Related: bicycle, thieves, civil rights, ku klux klan, sequence
  • A Critique Of Two Concerts - 1,695 words
    A Critique Of Two Concerts Music is one of the most unique performing arts due to the way it has evolved. Styles and melodies considered unfit in one era are displayed prominently in another. The two concerts previewed in this report have two different and distinct techniques. The first performance that I attended was a symphonic concert playing a mix of contemporary and early 20th century works at Carnegie Hall. The second performance was an organ recital highlighted by the by the live performance of Bach's most well known pieces. Hopefully this term paper will objectively and subjectively critique and compare the two performances. An orchestra is a collection of a variety of instruments us ...
    Related: critique, baroque music, small group, renaissance music, horrific
  • A Date With Kosinski - 1,590 words
    A Date With Kosinski A Date with Kosinski Being James Bond is every man's dream. The beautiful women, fancy cars, dangerous journeys, and beautiful women. Many men would love to be in his place where all the danger and excitement take place. We don't have that capability to become an international spy, but in the novel, Blind Date by Jerzy Kosinski, we are exposed to a life similar to that of James Bond. He goes through secret negotiations. Jerzy Kosinski's use of words greatly contributes to the novel's excellence. He forces the reader to imagine everything that happens in the novel using very descriptive words and phrases. The main character of the novel is George Levanter. He poses as an ...
    Related: young adult, nazi germany, world war ii, woman, philosophy
  • A Difficult Century Forming Of The World Government - 1,887 words
    A Difficult Century - Forming Of The World Government According to Held, Today, the mechanisms we have for enforcing international law depend too much on whether a powerful geo-political force such as the U.S. is willing to commit resources to the problem. In such a situation, a big state will likely do what it desires, acting in its own interests. Recent developments in Kosovo, Chechnya, Iran and other states in some kind of a conflict have just proven the above statement. Presently the most important developments in international law and relations between states are, almost exclusively, dictated by the Great Powers. The General Assembly of the UN is probably the only part of UN that repres ...
    Related: forming, world government, biggest challenge, economic cooperation, spreading
  • A Journey Though The Golden Gates Of Promise - 2,284 words
    ... because, without them, the United States would become overpopulated and it would slowly deteriorate. If Congress did not create the quota laws as a way to control who is allowed to enter the country, it would leave the magnificent "Golden Gates" open to anyone who wanted to enter the promise land. It is insane to even consider letting everyone of every ethnicity into the United States because the results would be devastating for the American society. American citizens often criticize that the quota laws discriminate towards different ethnic groups, but, in reality, it is common sense to prefer letting immigrants into the country that are more likely to "fit in" with the cultures being p ...
    Related: golden, promise, another country, labor laws, reject
  • A Lesson From Oliver - 5,155 words
    A Lesson From Oliver by David Jorgensen Like any other morning I was up at four, the day Oliver met with his violent death. At four in the morning the grass is wet. Now, it's still wet at 6 a.m. and even at seven, and these tend to be the hours of choice for most people wishing to appreciate the phenomenon of grass wetness. But it's a tragedy of economics that, when work starts at 5 a.m., one is not afforded the same time-options for grass appreciation as members of the sane world. Nor was this tragedy confined to my having to appreciate the wet grass while in a metabolic state more suited to hibernation. Four a.m. was my only chance to absorb all of northern Ontario's summer morning treasur ...
    Related: lesson, oliver, decision making, prime minister, initiated
  • A Mid Summer Nights Dream Film Analysis - 1,207 words
    A Mid Summer Night's Dream Film Analysis A Mid Summer Night's Dream Film Analysis A Mid summer Night's Dream is another entry into Shakespeare's recent rebirth on film. Michael Hoffman's film dose not stay true to the text, but he must take liberties to allow for this classic story to be entertaining to today's audience. In this essay I will discuss the differences between the text vision and the film vision of this story from the historical setting, the time placement, Hoffman's personal adaptations, and finally Hoffman's character adaptations. In Michael Hoffman's film of William Shakespeare's a Midsummer Night's Dream, Hoffman has made some changes to the location and historical aspects o ...
    Related: a midsummer night's dream, dream, film, film analysis, film version, midsummer night, night dream
  • A Postmodern Age - 1,398 words
    ... t is the idea that areas of existence and culture can be separated from, that is abstracted out of, other areas of existence and culture. In addition, we tend to form social groups that are largely based on abstractions (corporations, nations, economic classes, religious preferences, race (which is really an abstract rather than a physical or biological category or relationship), sexual preferences, etc.). As a result, membership in social groups tends to be unstable and transitory as one can easily move between social groups. This, again, creates a high sense of anxiety and tension; this anxiety results, on the one hand, in attempts within these abstract groups to define and redefine th ...
    Related: postmodern, social life, media images, popular culture, ties
  • A Reaction To Uncle Toms Cabin - 1,386 words
    ... ill a young boy, his father sold Uncle Tom to the slave trader Mr. Haley. Growing up on a southern plantation, George naturally inherited the slave-owning tradition of his culture. When he found the beaten and dying Uncle Tom, however, his perception immediately changed and he vowed to "do what one man can to drive out this curse of slavery from my land! (p.455)" It was George who buried Uncle Tom, and he then returned home to free all of his own slaves. George was an admirable character because he demonstrated growth and integrity and illustrated that the inveterate rationalization of slave-owning was one that was not immutable. I also feel that the character of Mr. Wilson is one that c ...
    Related: cabin, toms, toms cabin, uncle, uncle tom's cabin, uncle toms cabin
  • A Rose For Emily Time And Setting - 963 words
    A Rose For Emily (Time And Setting) In A Rose for Emily by William Faulkner, the author uses the element of time to enhance details of the setting and vice versa. By avoiding the chronological order of events of Miss Emily's life, Faulkner first gives the reader a finished puzzle, and then allows the reader to examine this puzzle piece by piece, step by step. By doing so, he enhances the plot and presents two different perspectives of time held by the characters. The first perspective (the world of the present) views time as a mechanical progression in which the past is a diminishing road. The second perspective (the world of tradition and the past) views the past as a huge meadow which no w ...
    Related: a rose for emily, emily, rose for emily, vice versa, william faulkner
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