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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: consumption

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  • Alcoholism Is A Wideranging And Complex Disease That Heavily Plagues Society Drinking Is Defined As The Consumption Of A Liqu - 1,066 words
    Alcoholism is a wide-ranging and complex disease that heavily plagues society. Drinking is defined as the consumption of a liquid, and/or the act of drinking alcoholic beverages especially to excess. Every year alcohol is responsible for 1/2 of all murders, accidental deaths, and suicides; 1/3 of all drowning, boating, and aviation deaths; 1/2 of all crimes; and almost 1/2 of all fatal automobile accidents (Overview 1). Alcohol is a potent nonprescription drug sold to anyone over the national legal drinking age, 21. Unlike carbohydrates, fats, and proteins, which can be manufactured by the body, alcohol is a substance that is not made within the body. It is a food, because it supplies a conc ...
    Related: alcoholism, binge drinking, consumption, drinking, drinking age, drinking coffee, heavily
  • Alcoholism Is A Wideranging And Complex Disease That Heavily Plagues Society Drinking Is Defined As The Consumption Of A Liqu - 1,012 words
    ... igestive enzymes, which can irritate the stomach wall, producing heartburn, nausea, gastritis, and ulcers. The stomach of a chronic drinker loses the ability to adequately move food and expel it into the duodenum, leaving some food always in the stomach, causing sluggish digestion and vomiting. Alcohol may also inflame the small and large intestine (Overview 4). Moderate daily drinking may be good for the heart, but for many the risks outweigh the benefits. Even one binge may produce irregular heartbeats, and an alcohol abuser experience increased risk of high blood pressure, heart attacks, heart arrhythmia, and heart disease. Alcohol may cause cardiomyopathy (a disease of the heart musc ...
    Related: alcoholism, consumption, drinking, heart disease, heavily, legal drinking
  • A Consumer Is Socially Defined As Someone Whom Is Pressured Into Buying Items - 368 words
    1) A consumer is socially defined as someone whom is pressured into buying items forced upon them my capitalist methods. They are also people who believe that if they buy a particular item it will make their lives better. Society has forced consumerism unto people and it has increased over the last century. A consumer was not constructed until the 19th century, when the times emphasized moderation and self-denial. At this time workers were to be frugal and save their money. Most of the time the typical family produced most of what they needed and had few household possessions. The families had little arousal of desire because there were no prepackaged items with brand names and most of the i ...
    Related: buying, consumer, consumer credit, socially, federal government
  • Knowledge, Ability, And Skill - 1,682 words
    1. Demonstrates the necessary knowledge, ability, and skill for assessing the physical, emotional, and mental capabilities of concerned persons to carry out an intervention. 2. Demonstrates commitment to ABCI principle that the primary goal of intervention is to secure immediate help for the chemically dependent person first and foremost. 3. Demonstrates commitment to ABCIs principle that pre-intervention counseling sessions for concerned persons are short term an time limited and should not be prolonged to the extent that immediate help for the chemically dependent person is postponed. 4. Ensures that during the intervention statements by concerned person to the chemically dependent person ...
    Related: skill, family member, drug dependence, criminal justice, spouse
  • Buckley Jr - 2,713 words
    1. WM. F. BUCKLEY JR. Last summer WFB was asked by the New York Bar Association to make a statement to the panel of lawyers considering the drug question. He made the following statement: We are speaking of a plague that consumes an estimated $75 billion per year of public money, exacts an estimated $70 billion a year from consumers, is responsible for nearly 50 per cent of the million Americans who are today in jail, occupies an estimated 50 per cent of the trial time of our judiciary, and takes the time of 400,000 policemen--yet a plague for which no cure is at hand, nor in prospect. Perhaps you, ladies and gentlemen of the Bar, will understand it if I chronicle my own itinerary on the sub ...
    Related: buckley, illegal drug, medical care, federal government, princeton
  • 51000 - 994 words
    5/10/00 Globalization and Ideal Landscapes Globalization is a broad term that has several meanings to different factions, cultural Groups and nations. For our purposes globalization refers to the loss of time and space through the rapid development of technologies. It also refers to a world in which all nations and peoples are directly or indirectly connected through the international economy and world politics. This rapid trend toward a globalized world has seen supporters from both the first world financial sectors and the mass producing agricultural sector. Its main detractors have been environmentalists and the indigenous peoples who are adversely affected by the encroaching nature of gl ...
    Related: point of view, computers and the internet, indigenous people, landscape, supporters
  • A Booming End To The 19th Century - 1,105 words
    A Booming End To The 19Th Century More changes occurred in America in the late 19th century than any other time period. The country went through rapid expansion from residents of its land to cuisine to transportation of goods and people. While the last quarter of the 20th century brought many modern conveniences, the century before brought this country things that would be nearly impossible to live without. The development of railroads was the single greatest change in the 19th century. In only twenty-five years, almost 70,000 miles of tracks were laid. This in itself was a great feat, because of all the people and products used in the building of the railroads. In order to build railroads, ...
    Related: civil war, conspicuous consumption, raw materials, layout, telephone
  • A Brave New World And 1984 Dissimilar - 1,215 words
    A Brave New World And 1984 Dissimilar A Brave New World and 1984 Dissimilar Although many similarities exist between Aldous Huxleys A Brave New World and George Orwells 1984, the works books though they deal with similar topics, are more dissimilar than alike. A Brave New World is a novel about the struggle of Bernard Marx, who rejects the tenants of his society when he discovers that he is not truly happy. 1984 is the story of Winston who finds forbidden love within the hypocrisy of his society. In both cases, the main character is in quiet rebellion against his government which is eventually found to be in vain. Huxley wrote A Brave New World in the third person so that the reader could be ...
    Related: 1984, brave, brave new world, dissimilar, real world, world history
  • A Brief View Of Early Western Civilization In The 18th Century - 973 words
    A Brief View Of Early Western Civilization In The 18Th Century The area of early western civilization just following the feudal period was a very interesting time in Europe. There were many new innovations and problems in the way of life of the people of that time. Agriculture was still the main occupation of the time for most people. Two big problems that the people faced were those of war and poor harvest. It was said that perhaps the largest problem was the problem with poor grain. For the majority of people there was also the problem of land. For these people they either had no land of their own or insufficient amounts of it to support a family even when times were good. Poor harvests al ...
    Related: century england, civilization, western civilization, prentice hall, third edition
  • A Comparison Contrast Of A Brave New World And 1984 - 1,292 words
    A Comparison Contrast of A Brave New World and 1984 Although many similarities exist between Aldous Huxley's A Brave New World and George Orwell's 1984, the works books though they deal with similar topics, are more dissimilar than alike. A Brave New World is a novel about the struggle of Bernard Marx, who rejects the tenants of his society when he discovers that he is not truly happy. 1984 is the story of Winston who finds forbidden love within the hypocrisy of his society. In both cases, the main character is in quiet rebellion against his government which is eventually found to be in vain. Huxley wrote A Brave New World in the third person so that the reader could be allotted a more compr ...
    Related: 1984, brave, brave new world, comparison, contrast, real world, world history
  • A Comparison Contrast Of A Brave New World And 1984 - 1,292 words
    A Comparison Contrast of A Brave New World and 1984 Although many similarities exist between Aldous Huxley's A Brave New World and George Orwell's 1984, the works books though they deal with similar topics, are more dissimilar than alike. A Brave New World is a novel about the struggle of Bernard Marx, who rejects the tenants of his society when he discovers that he is not truly happy. 1984 is the story of Winston who finds forbidden love within the hypocrisy of his society. In both cases, the main character is in quiet rebellion against his government which is eventually found to be in vain. Huxley wrote A Brave New World in the third person so that the reader could be allotted a more compr ...
    Related: 1984, brave, brave new world, comparison, contrast, real world, world history
  • A Comparison Contrast Of A Brave New World And 1984 - 1,292 words
    A Comparison Contrast of A Brave New World and 1984 Although many similarities exist between Aldous Huxley's A Brave New World and George Orwell's 1984, the works books though they deal with similar topics, are more dissimilar than alike. A Brave New World is a novel about the struggle of Bernard Marx, who rejects the tenants of his society when he discovers that he is not truly happy. 1984 is the story of Winston who finds forbidden love within the hypocrisy of his society. In both cases, the main character is in quiet rebellion against his government which is eventually found to be in vain. Huxley wrote A Brave New World in the third person so that the reader could be allotted a more compr ...
    Related: 1984, brave, brave new world, comparison, contrast, real world, world history
  • A Comparison Contrast Of A Brave New World And 1984 - 1,292 words
    A Comparison Contrast of A Brave New World and 1984 Although many similarities exist between Aldous Huxley's A Brave New World and George Orwell's 1984, the works books though they deal with similar topics, are more dissimilar than alike. A Brave New World is a novel about the struggle of Bernard Marx, who rejects the tenants of his society when he discovers that he is not truly happy. 1984 is the story of Winston who finds forbidden love within the hypocrisy of his society. In both cases, the main character is in quiet rebellion against his government which is eventually found to be in vain. Huxley wrote A Brave New World in the third person so that the reader could be allotted a more compr ...
    Related: 1984, brave, brave new world, comparison, contrast, real world, world history
  • A Modest Proposal - 1,260 words
    A Modest Proposal Unlike most essays, Jonathan Swift's A Modest Proposal is written for the reader to see through what the narrator is expressing. The narrator does not want the reader to agree that the solution to overpopulation and poverty in Ireland is to eat babies, he wants the reader to see there needs to be a practical solution. By stating the advantages and objections to his proposal, using ironic words and phrases, he directs the reader not to see the apparent, but the implicit. Swift's narrative voice metaphorically compares the Irish to pigs and cows, which implies the Irish are being treated subhumanly. Although something seems one way to the narrator, Jonathan Swift wants the re ...
    Related: modest, modest proposal, proposal, harcourt brace, young children
  • A Postmodern Age - 1,398 words
    ... t is the idea that areas of existence and culture can be separated from, that is abstracted out of, other areas of existence and culture. In addition, we tend to form social groups that are largely based on abstractions (corporations, nations, economic classes, religious preferences, race (which is really an abstract rather than a physical or biological category or relationship), sexual preferences, etc.). As a result, membership in social groups tends to be unstable and transitory as one can easily move between social groups. This, again, creates a high sense of anxiety and tension; this anxiety results, on the one hand, in attempts within these abstract groups to define and redefine th ...
    Related: postmodern, social life, media images, popular culture, ties
  • A Universal Perspective On Belief: - 1,897 words
    A Universal Perspective On Belief: A Universal Perspective on Belief: A Response to Pragmatic and Cartesian Approaches to Epistemology By Britta Rempel (*note to reader:I hope this gives all of you struggling with some concepts in Intro to Philosophy a clearer view on how to approach your own paper, please do not plagerise) The approaches given by Pierce and Nagel to the epistemological questions of doubt and belief, though diverse in that they are strictly pragmatist and Cartesian, contain a similar underlying principle. They both serve to show that belief cannot come from any source that appeals to one's feelings or purposes, experiences or impressions. Beliefs must arise from a non-person ...
    Related: fetal alcohol syndrome, alcohol syndrome, illegal drug, empiricism, stability
  • Abortion - 685 words
    Abortion Abortion is one of the most controversial issues in the United States today. One out of every three pregnancies never come to term because a woman has an abortion (Flanders 3). It is understood that a new individual human begis growing in the mothers uterus at fertilization (When Does Life Begin). The term abortion refers to any premature expulsion of a human fetus. Approximately 93 percent of all induced abortions are done for elective, non-medical reasons. In 1973, the Supreme Court handed down Roe v. Wade ad Doe v. Bolton decisions legalizing abortion in all 50 states during all nine months of pregnancy, for any reason, medical, social, or otherwise (Abortion: Some Medical Facts) ...
    Related: abortion, abortion laws, legalizing abortion, united states today, nervous system
  • Abortion Is A Subject Of Perception To Find A Clear Cut Solution Would Be To Commit Suicide Doctors Say That Candy Is Not Bad - 1,958 words
    Abortion is a subject of perception; to find a clear cut solution would be to commit suicide. Doctors say that candy is not bad, so long as there is not a consumption of it at one time. All things in life must be viewed through a reasonable, clear mind. To say abortion is good or bad is to look at it blindly. Abortion is not like racism or oppression where to look at one incident is to miss the point. Or if we look at the big picture we see the crime, and abuse. Abortion is by far a twentieth century invention or discovery, the only thing modern about abortions is the procedure. During the time of ancient Greece and Rome there have been writings of abortions. Abortions may be dangerous no, b ...
    Related: abortion, candy, perception, suicide, ancient greece
  • Abortion: Prochoice Or Prolife - 1,451 words
    Abortion: Pro-Choice Or Pro-Life Daniels 1 Kimberly Daniels Ms. Clara Wright English IV 21 January 2000 Abortion: Pro-Choice or Pro-Life Controlling Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explain the pro-choice and pro-life controversy of receiving an abortion. I. Introduction A. Definition of abortion. II. Thesis statement A. Pro-choice B. Pro-Life III. The views A. The moral viewpoint B. The murder viewpoint C. The restriction viewpoint D. The parental consent viewpoint E. The rape justification viewpoint F. The safe viewpoint IV. Conclusion A. First Amendment Daniels 2 Abortion: Pro-Choice or Pro-Life " But oh, thrice guilty is he who drove her to desperation which impelled her to the c ...
    Related: social issues, the bible, united states supreme, anthony, advocate
  • Abraham Lincoln - 1,920 words
    Abraham Lincoln Abraham Lincoln was born on February 12, 1809 in Kentucky. When he was two, the Lincolns moved a few miles to another farm on the old Cumberland Trail. A year later, his mother gave birth to another boy, Thomas, but he died a few days later. When Lincoln was seven his family moved to Indiana. In 1818, Lincolns mother died from a deadly disease called the "milk-sick." Then ten years later his sister died and left him with only his father and stepmother. Lincoln traveled to New Salem in April 1831 and settled there the following July. In the fall of 1836 he and Mrs. Bennett Abell had a deal that if she brought her single sister to New Salem he had to promise to marry her. When ...
    Related: abraham, abraham lincoln, lincoln, john wilkes booth, president johnson
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